Sports club official : dealing with club members

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
I'm interested in getting the views of posters here.

I'm involved with several sports clubs in different codes. My involvement in all but one of the sports clubs is for physical training and preparation. But for one club, as well as being physical training coach, I am on the executive board of the club.

Officers are voted for each year at the club annual general meeting. This year I was asked to seek election as club treasurer as the incumbent person could not commit to doing the job for another term. I was selected and duly elected.

As treasurer, I'm required to contact all club members to seek their payment of the annual subscriptions for membership of the club. Our club has adult members and teenage/junior members. Subscriptions are set at the level of the age of the club member, with adults paying more and junior members paying less.

We sent out our circulars to the various members. Our junior members are asked to pay an annual membership fee €45.00.
This fee gives them membership for 12 months, access to the facilities and the equipment in the club, use of indoor facilities etc.

Last week I received a letter from the mother of one of the members who was contacted. She informed me that she was an unmarried mother, and that she could not afford to pay €45.00 annual fee. In response I pointed out to her that we could arrange to collect the fee on an installment basis rather than having requiring her to pay €45.00 in one single payment.

Yesterday, the club received a letter from this woman's legal advisor, a barrister with an address at the Four Courts, informing us that his client (the woman) would pay us €0.86 per week and that we were to accept the clients son's membership!

Just wondering if any other people here get the same type of response in similar situations? The obvious question here is if money is tight with the person, how could they afford to engage a barrister to write this letter? How much did that cost and who paid the barristers fee?
 


between the bridges

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Messages
45,018
Get yer barrister to write back and say she's 28 cents short...
 

SamsonS

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
4,764
I'm interested in getting the views of posters here.

I'm involved with several sports clubs in different codes. My involvement in all but one of the sports clubs is for physical training and preparation. But for one club, as well as being physical training coach, I am on the executive board of the club.

Officers are voted for each year at the club annual general meeting. This year I was asked to seek election as club treasurer as the incumbent person could not commit to doing the job for another term. I was selected and duly elected.

As treasurer, I'm required to contact all club members to seek their payment of the annual subscriptions for membership of the club. Our club has adult members and teenage/junior members. Subscriptions are set at the level of the age of the club member, with adults paying more and junior members paying less.

We sent out our circulars to the various members. Our junior members are asked to pay an annual membership fee €45.00.
This fee gives them membership for 12 months, access to the facilities and the equipment in the club, use of indoor facilities etc.

Last week I received a letter from the mother of one of the members who was contacted. She informed me that she was an unmarried mother, and that she could not afford to pay €45.00 annual fee. In response I pointed out to her that we could arrange to collect the fee on an installment basis rather than having requiring her to pay €45.00 in one single payment.

Yesterday, the club received a letter from this woman's legal advisor, a barrister with an address at the Four Courts, informing us that his client (the woman) would pay us €0.86 per week and that we were to accept the clients son's membership!

Just wondering if any other people here get the same type of response in similar situations? The obvious question here is if money is tight with the person, how could they afford to engage a barrister to write this letter? How much did that cost and who paid the barristers fee?
Would suggest you say you are open to instalment payments, and this can be done by Direct Debit or Standing Order - nobody want to be doing that for 86c per week. Point out that if this is not an option for her, that cash can be paid, say where and when and how often and the minimum amount.

My guess is that legal is an acquaintance and did letter as a favour - won't get too bothered about the "she can afford lawyer, but wont pay 45".
 

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
Would suggest you say you are open to instalment payments, and this can be done by Direct Debit or Standing Order - nobody want to be doing that for 86c per week. Point out that if this is not an option for her, that cash can be paid, say where and when and how often and the minimum amount.

My guess is that legal is an acquaintance and did letter as a favour - won't get too bothered about the "she can afford lawyer, but wont pay 45".
Cheers. Yeah, we'd be more than happy to work with whatever payment schedule would suit the woman.
And we'd facilitate that in any way we could.

We were a bit taken aback at the letter and its contents. Her son is a valued and well liked member of our club.
 

runwiththewind

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
12,617
I'm interested in getting the views of posters here.

I'm involved with several sports clubs in different codes. My involvement in all but one of the sports clubs is for physical training and preparation. But for one club, as well as being physical training coach, I am on the executive board of the club.

Officers are voted for each year at the club annual general meeting. This year I was asked to seek election as club treasurer as the incumbent person could not commit to doing the job for another term. I was selected and duly elected.

As treasurer, I'm required to contact all club members to seek their payment of the annual subscriptions for membership of the club. Our club has adult members and teenage/junior members. Subscriptions are set at the level of the age of the club member, with adults paying more and junior members paying less.

We sent out our circulars to the various members. Our junior members are asked to pay an annual membership fee €45.00.
This fee gives them membership for 12 months, access to the facilities and the equipment in the club, use of indoor facilities etc.

Last week I received a letter from the mother of one of the members who was contacted. She informed me that she was an unmarried mother, and that she could not afford to pay €45.00 annual fee. In response I pointed out to her that we could arrange to collect the fee on an installment basis rather than having requiring her to pay €45.00 in one single payment.

Yesterday, the club received a letter from this woman's legal advisor, a barrister with an address at the Four Courts, informing us that his client (the woman) would pay us €0.86 per week and that we were to accept the clients son's membership!

Just wondering if any other people here get the same type of response in similar situations? The obvious question here is if money is tight with the person, how could they afford to engage a barrister to write this letter? How much did that cost and who paid the barristers fee?
If she can afford a barrister, she can afford 45 euros.

If this letter is genuine, it's utter bullshyte.
 

runwiththewind

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
12,617
Cheers. Yeah, we'd be more than happy to work with whatever payment schedule would suit the woman.
And we'd facilitate that in any way we could.

We were a bit taken aback at the letter and its contents. Her son is a valued and well liked member of our club.
That's a dangerous route to take. The fee is 45 euros. Dont go down that route, otherwise others will want the same. Paying in installmnents only incurs more cost for both.
 

SamsonS

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
4,764
That's a dangerous route to take. The fee is 45 euros. Dont go down that route, otherwise others will want the same. Paying in installmnents only incurs more cost for both.
if you have systems in place, no reason you can't have instalments, makes your club more accessible.
 

Round tower

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 9, 2011
Messages
7,382
I'm interested in getting the views of posters here.

I'm involved with several sports clubs in different codes. My involvement in all but one of the sports clubs is for physical training and preparation. But for one club, as well as being physical training coach, I am on the executive board of the club.

Officers are voted for each year at the club annual general meeting. This year I was asked to seek election as club treasurer as the incumbent person could not commit to doing the job for another term. I was selected and duly elected.

As treasurer, I'm required to contact all club members to seek their payment of the annual subscriptions for membership of the club. Our club has adult members and teenage/junior members. Subscriptions are set at the level of the age of the club member, with adults paying more and junior members paying less.

We sent out our circulars to the various members. Our junior members are asked to pay an annual membership fee €45.00.
This fee gives them membership for 12 months, access to the facilities and the equipment in the club, use of indoor facilities etc.

Last week I received a letter from the mother of one of the members who was contacted. She informed me that she was an unmarried mother, and that she could not afford to pay €45.00 annual fee. In response I pointed out to her that we could arrange to collect the fee on an installment basis rather than having requiring her to pay €45.00 in one single payment.

Yesterday, the club received a letter from this woman's legal advisor, a barrister with an address at the Four Courts, informing us that his client (the woman) would pay us €0.86 per week and that we were to accept the clients son's membership!

Just wondering if any other people here get the same type of response in similar situations? The obvious question here is if money is tight with the person, how could they afford to engage a barrister to write this letter? How much did that cost and who paid the barristers fee?
Is their a minimnum amoount a bank/credit union will do a direct debit for, also a question what would the banking fees be on the instalments, would advise inquiring with your bank on the issue, if he is a player the question for insurance reasons as well
 

NYCKY

Moderator
Joined
Apr 17, 2010
Messages
13,329
I'm interested in getting the views of posters here.

I'm involved with several sports clubs in different codes. My involvement in all but one of the sports clubs is for physical training and preparation. But for one club, as well as being physical training coach, I am on the executive board of the club.

Officers are voted for each year at the club annual general meeting. This year I was asked to seek election as club treasurer as the incumbent person could not commit to doing the job for another term. I was selected and duly elected.

As treasurer, I'm required to contact all club members to seek their payment of the annual subscriptions for membership of the club. Our club has adult members and teenage/junior members. Subscriptions are set at the level of the age of the club member, with adults paying more and junior members paying less.

We sent out our circulars to the various members. Our junior members are asked to pay an annual membership fee €45.00.
This fee gives them membership for 12 months, access to the facilities and the equipment in the club, use of indoor facilities etc.

Last week I received a letter from the mother of one of the members who was contacted. She informed me that she was an unmarried mother, and that she could not afford to pay €45.00 annual fee. In response I pointed out to her that we could arrange to collect the fee on an installment basis rather than having requiring her to pay €45.00 in one single payment.

Yesterday, the club received a letter from this woman's legal advisor, a barrister with an address at the Four Courts, informing us that his client (the woman) would pay us €0.86 per week and that we were to accept the clients son's membership!

Just wondering if any other people here get the same type of response in similar situations? The obvious question here is if money is tight with the person, how could they afford to engage a barrister to write this letter? How much did that cost and who paid the barristers fee?
Well firstly check that the letter is legit and from the actual barrister not the janitor at the barristers office. Not sure in what country you can decide how much you're going to pay and how often you are going to pay it. These things can be negotiated but not unilaterally decided.

E45 is not really a lot of money and frankly sounds like a good deal for an annual membership. If she can't manage this, they try another gym.

The administrative and processing costs of collecting 86c a week would create an unfair burden on you and the club.
 

Betson

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
17,034
Tell her if she does not pony up the 45 quid you will send two of the bigger lads in the club around to her house to break her legs. It is about respect.
 

Buchaill Dana

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
8,630
Lots of clubs have arrangements with long standing members who are having a hard time. But that isn't done the way she did it.

Check the barrister exists, write back saying you will take it quarterly and express your disappointment with her confrontational approach. You are under no obligation to accept this demand but at the same time the kid shouldn't suffer.
 

Levellers

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2011
Messages
14,179
Firstly you don't have to accept any instructions from the barrister. Write to the barrister asking who the solicitor acting in this case is. Citizens nearly always have to go through a solicitor to access a barrister.

Secondly I doubt a barrister couldn't work out that 86 cents X 52 does not reach E45.

Lastly let the kid join and tell the mother (who is acting the maggot) that you will take her to the Small Claims Court.

You should set aside a bit of money for real hardship cases.
 

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
Thanks for the advice, folks.

I don't know the woman in question but he youngster is a nice lad and he's a good member and a valued member.

The advice about checking with the barrister is good advice. I don't want to make this into a them/us situation.
But I have to be fair to those who do pay their fair share and do so willingly. I know that people can be at the pin of the collar, and we're more than willing to work out some installment arrangement to help her and help us

Thanks again for the replies
 

Northsideman

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2010
Messages
9,671
Bring this up at the next Exec meeting, read it out verbatim and get it minuted as such.

Out this clown as much as possible, she is taking the complete and utter p!ss.
 

cricket

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
13,786
Bring this up at the next Exec meeting, read it out verbatim and get it minuted as such.

Out this clown as much as possible, she is taking the complete and utter p!ss.
Agreed, don't make this a you v them situation. Put it to the officer board, but ensure that confidentiality is respected. Let you then act on the instructions of the board. It strikes me that there might just be a bit of ballhopping here.
 

macedo

Well-known member
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
1,044
Firstly you don't have to accept any instructions from the barrister. Write to the barrister asking who the solicitor acting in this case is. Citizens nearly always have to go through a solicitor to access a barrister.

Secondly I doubt a barrister couldn't work out that 86 cents X 52 does not reach E45.

Lastly let the kid join and tell the mother (who is acting the maggot) that you will take her to the Small Claims Court.

You should set aside a bit of money for real hardship cases.
Have you had many dealings with the legal profession?
 

Glenshane4

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 5, 2012
Messages
9,749
Check with the appropriate professional body that the barrister actually exists. If he does, make a complaint to the disciplinary branch of the barrister's professional organisation.
 

Roberto Jordan

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Messages
2,059
I'm interested in getting the views of posters here.

I'm involved with several sports clubs in different codes. My involvement in all but one of the sports clubs is for physical training and preparation. But for one club, as well as being physical training coach, I am on the executive board of the club.

Officers are voted for each year at the club annual general meeting. This year I was asked to seek election as club treasurer as the incumbent person could not commit to doing the job for another term. I was selected and duly elected.

As treasurer, I'm required to contact all club members to seek their payment of the annual subscriptions for membership of the club. Our club has adult members and teenage/junior members. Subscriptions are set at the level of the age of the club member, with adults paying more and junior members paying less.

We sent out our circulars to the various members. Our junior members are asked to pay an annual membership fee €45.00.
This fee gives them membership for 12 months, access to the facilities and the equipment in the club, use of indoor facilities etc.

Last week I received a letter from the mother of one of the members who was contacted. She informed me that she was an unmarried mother, and that she could not afford to pay €45.00 annual fee. In response I pointed out to her that we could arrange to collect the fee on an installment basis rather than having requiring her to pay €45.00 in one single payment.

Yesterday, the club received a letter from this woman's legal advisor, a barrister with an address at the Four Courts, informing us that his client (the woman) would pay us €0.86 per week and that we were to accept the clients son's membership!

Just wondering if any other people here get the same type of response in similar situations? The obvious question here is if money is tight with the person, how could they afford to engage a barrister to write this letter? How much did that cost and who paid the barristers fee?
Honest gut reaction....
We play sports and join clubs for enjoyment and social connection. Anyone who "goes to law" is not to be welcomed as a member.
 

fat finger

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2016
Messages
2,206
The woman clearly has an attitude problem which may well explain having no partner, but the danger is the lad adopting her problem attitude and starting to fail at the sport. A way to deal with this might be to take the lad aside, explain that his mother's attitude is disappointing, but to save an unpleasant showdown with her, to arrange for the lad to carry out tasks around the club as payment for his membership
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top