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Stormont and the Irish language

Breanainn

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Sinn Féin seems genuinely committed to the promotion of Irish north of the border, with the SF Education Minister authorising the development of Gaelscoileanna, but the DUP is equally antagonistic, as exemplified by Gregory Campbell. Presumably, the SDLP favours the promotion of the language, but are the UUP as vehemently opposed as their unionist rivals, and are the smaller parties in support of an Official Languages Act? (Mods: For some reason, it was impossible to start this thread in the NI Assembly Forum)
 
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GDPR

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The UUP used to be very hostile to the Irish language but as of their last conference in October 2015, there seems to be a thaw in the air. Quote Mike Nesbitt:

We need to identify the cold spots in society and warm them up. For example, we need to address the fact that some people who cherish the Irish Language feel we do not respect them and their love of the language.It’s all very well saying Sinn Féin politicised it – and they did, and they still are in places – but where does that get us? What’s the next step for us? Many unionists see it as their heritage too, so wouldn’t it be better to support them? Or at least make sure our words and deeds do not convey the wrong message to those who do cherish the Irish Language.


Note he is careful not to commit himself to support for legislation but the speech does signal a change of mood music.
 

Franzoni

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The UUP used to be very hostile to the Irish language but as of their last conference in October 2015, there seems to be a thaw in the air. Quote Mike Nesbitt:

We need to identify the cold spots in society and warm them up. For example, we need to address the fact that some people who cherish the Irish Language feel we do not respect them and their love of the language.It’s all very well saying Sinn Féin politicised it – and they did, and they still are in places – but where does that get us? What’s the next step for us? Many unionists see it as their heritage too, so wouldn’t it be better to support them? Or at least make sure our words and deeds do not convey the wrong message to those who do cherish the Irish Language.


Note he is careful not to commit himself to support for legislation but the speech does signal a change of mood music.
Does this mean they have put the angle grinders beyond use...?
 

GDPR

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Other parties? The Alliance party does not endorse an Act but has repeatedly called for respect for the Irish language and supports its promotion through cultural organisations. Their main concern appears to be that it should not be politicised.

The Green Party back an Irish Language Act.

I think its obvious DUP and TUV dont. SF and SDLP do.

That should cover it :)
 

RodShaft

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Other parties? The Alliance party does not endorse an Act but has repeatedly called for respect for the Irish language and supports its promotion through cultural organisations. Their main concern appears to be that it should not be politicised.

The Green Party back an Irish Language Act.

I think its obvious DUP and TUV dont. SF and SDLP do.

That should cover it :)

What about the giants in PBP? You know the party that are apparently going to sweep all before them and destroy Sinn Féin?

Surprisingly for a unionist, and specifically anti nationalist party, this is what they have to say..


Irish Language

The current government has shown little interest or enthusiasm in promoting the Irish Langauge People Before Pro t took part in a recent Dearg le Fearg protest to support the anger that many feel about its treatment PBP will

1. Support measures to revive the economic base of Gaeltacht areas

2. Insist that all public o cials dealing with the Gaeltacht have full pro ciency in the language

3. Increase the use of the Irish language on the national broadcaster Expand and develop TG4

4. Provide free Irish language classes in areas where there is a local demand
 

Eire1976

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If Unionists want the north east to be a normal part of Ireland then they need to recognise that it is Ireland that they live on and Irish people they are living with.
 

GDPR

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If Unionists want the north east to be a normal part of Ireland then they need to recognise that it is Ireland that they live on and Irish people they are living with.
Its become a political football. One of those wedge issues the DUP like to focus on eg gay cakes, gay blood donors, lesbian foster parents.

TBH most people in NI would be fairly cynical about the languages policy anyway - all those leaflets in makey-uppety Ulster-Scootch just to ensure that "ussuns" came in for their share of any grant money going round :)

Those who feel strongly about it - pro or contra - would feel very strongly but they would be in the minority on both sides. And I speak as someone who voted for Irish language signage when our local council consulted us on the basis that the tourists LOVE it.

But thats a Glenswoman for you :)
 

blokesbloke

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If Unionists want the north east to be a normal part of Ireland then they need to recognise that it is Ireland that they live on and Irish people they are living with.
:confused: I didn't think they did - isn't that the point of being a Unionist?
 

GDPR

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:confused: I didn't think they did - isn't that the point of being a Unionist?
Depends on the Unionist. Some accept they are Irish but wish to remain in the UK and have British nationality, some think they are a special breed of Irish person known as Northern Irish, some think they are solely British, whether you define it as an ethnic or supra-national identity and most just dont want Dublin rule. In that respect they are entirely at one with the population of Ireland outside Dublin )
 

Lord Talbot

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Any Irish language legislation in NI has to go hand in hand with new, more moderate legislation in the south.

The official langauge act 2003 (Fianna Fail) needs to be put in the bin, its far too antagonistic toward our majority language.
 

blokesbloke

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Depends on the Unionist. Some accept they are Irish but wish to remain in the UK and have British nationality, some think they are a special breed of Irish person known as Northern Irish, some think they are solely British, whether you define it as an ethnic or supra-national identity and most just dont want Dublin rule. In that respect they are entirely at one with the population of Ireland outside Dublin )
Do you mean to tell me that all this time they only had to move the capital to Cork and we could have been spared all this nonsense?

Bloody Dubs refusing to recognise Da Real Capital!
 

blokesbloke

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Its become a political football. One of those wedge issues the DUP like to focus on eg gay cakes, gay blood donors, lesbian foster parents.

TBH most people in NI would be fairly cynical about the languages policy anyway - all those leaflets in makey-uppety Ulster-Scootch just to ensure that "ussuns" came in for their share of any grant money going round :)

Those who feel strongly about it - pro or contra - would feel very strongly but they would be in the minority on both sides. And I speak as someone who voted for Irish language signage when our local council consulted us on the basis that the tourists LOVE it.

But thats a Glenswoman for you :)
I píss myself laughing at the very notion of "Ulster-Scots".

What a complete joke and waste of money.

Far rather Irish was promoted with UK tax money - it's a real language...
 

RodShaft

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Any Irish language legislation in NI has to go hand in hand with new, more moderate legislation in the south.

The official langauge act 2003 (Fianna Fail) needs to be put in the bin, its far too antagonistic toward our majority language.

You mean the language that everyone can get service in? The language that is often the only language allowed to be used?

The Act needs to be binned alright. Because it is not a serious attempt to grant any rights to the Irish language community
 

GDPR

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Do you mean to tell me that all this time they only had to move the capital to Cork and we could have been spared all this nonsense?

Bloody Dubs refusing to recognise Da Real Capital!
Belfast for the capital :)

*Waits for the Derry Wans to land*
 

GDPR

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I píss myself laughing at the very notion of "Ulster-Scots".

What a complete joke and waste of money.

Far rather Irish was promoted with UK tax money - it's a real language...
Oh such a scam :) You know they had a help line you could dial and have a conversation in Ulster Scots - and not one person rang it. That is because Ulster Scots is what we all speak. :)

And the worst of it was they were literally inventing vocabulary to give the impression there was a synonym for any ordinary English word.

Irish is a language. Ulster Scots is a dialect.
 

RodShaft

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I píss myself laughing at the very notion of "Ulster-Scots".

What a complete joke and waste of money.

Far rather Irish was promoted with UK tax money - it's a real language...
Ulster Scots IS a real language.


English is a hybrid of several similar Germanic and Scandanavian languages. These gradually blended together to form English.

Ulster Scots is an offshoot of Lallans, which is one of those hybrids. Far more separate and distinct from English than it now is, but coming from a position of being a distinct and separate language.

It is not a makey uppy language.
 

RodShaft

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Oh such a scam :) You know they had a help line you could dial and have a conversation in Ulster Scots - and not one person rang it. That is because Ulster Scots is what we all speak. :)

And the worst of it was they were literally inventing vocabulary to give the impression there was a synonym for any ordinary English word.

Irish is a language. Ulster Scots is a dialect.
You should read a little about the history of Lallans. Lowland Scottish.
 

blokesbloke

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Ulster Scots IS a real language.


English is a hybrid of several similar Germanic and Scandanavian languages. These gradually blended together to form English.

Ulster Scots is an offshoot of Lallans, which is one of those hybrids. Far more separate and distinct from English than it now is, but coming from a position of being a distinct and separate language.

It is not a makey uppy language.
It is a dialect, and one which can be understood by anyone who speaks standard English, therefore setting up a helpline in it or writing leaflets (phonetically) in it as an alternative to English is a disgraceful waste of money.

The part which is made up is using non-standard spellings of words, written phonetically because if they were written correctly it would just be... eh... English.

You could do that with the dialect spoken in Liverpool and call it Scouse, but it still would't be a real language and Scousers still wouldn't need a special Scouse hotline or leaflets written in Scouse - because they can understand and read English, which is virtually identical to Scouse.

There's a Scottish newspaper which has the odd article in "Scots" - I can read every word of it and understand it and I only speak English.

So fine write in Ulster Scots if it pleases you, but don't pretend you need a seperate helpline to call or a leaflet to read, because you don't - and I massively resent my tax money being spend on such utter crap.
 
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RodShaft

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Do you mean to tell me that all this time they only had to move the capital to Cork and we could have been spared all this nonsense?

Bloody Dubs refusing to recognise Da Real Capital!

Some of us would need only the slightest excuse to truck bomb Pana.
 


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