Study in Germany: Alarming decline in the nr of insects

Filibuster

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Rural France is alive with insects and wildlife . Its great to see, and highlighted to me just how much we've lost in Ireland.
Is that not in part to do with higher temperatures. France is significantly warmer than here most of the year and always had a lot more insect life.

I’m not saying we don’t have a crisis due to use of insecticides but in general if you’ve cooler climates insects cannot self heat like birds and mammals so you simply don’t get as much activity.

Also I’m wondering on the comparison between 1970s cars and 2017 cars could almost of the lack of insect road kill be to with aerodynamics? Modern cars are designed not to catch air on surfaces to reduce drag. The result of that is you would aim to have a flow of air around the car, not impacting it forceful. That would cause insects to get caught in a current that sweeps them off the window and safely around the car, unsquished.

Again I’m not saying that there isn’t a problem and I do ageee with banning the harmful pesticides that are risking pollinators but I think we need to be making arguments with irrefutable survey data to back this up.

I’m noticing far fewer bees than I would have seen around in the past and even this year wasps seemed to be less of a thing whereas I’m normally plagued with them. However mosquitos seem to be doing fine ... I’ve never been bitten by mosquitos much in Ireland but this summer in cork we had a major problem with them at my house to the extent we had to start using citronella.
 


yosef shompeter

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https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/04/world/europe/krefeld-germany-insect-armageddon.html

AND

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/10/oh-no/543390/

Here's the American version of the study I quoted at the beginning. It portrays the people who carried out the study as something like the home-guard from Dad's Army. I hope it's not as bad as they say or that it's something that can be explained like that it's seasonal or that. But it's scary.
The last paragraph in the NYTimes article puts it in a nutshell.
Hope it's not as bad as they say, but the anecdotal evidence that we all have... such as decades back, our parents having to clean the car front-window of insect-kill every forty or fifty miles kind of tallies with the decline that the German insect experts have collated in their study. And it tallies with the decline in insect eating birds.
 

The Field Marshal

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This is why people should mostly grow organic.
I thought insects were organic.?
I don't eat them myself.

What species do you grow?
 

JCR

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https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/04/world/europe/krefeld-germany-insect-armageddon.html

AND

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/10/oh-no/543390/

Here's the American version of the study I quoted at the beginning. It portrays the people who carried out the study as something like the home-guard from Dad's Army. I hope it's not as bad as they say or that it's something that can be explained like that it's seasonal or that. But it's scary.
The last paragraph in the NYTimes article puts it in a nutshell.
Hope it's not as bad as they say, but the anecdotal evidence that we all have... such as decades back, our parents having to clean the car front-window of insect-kill every forty or fifty miles kind of tallies with the decline that the German insect experts have collated in their study. And it tallies with the decline in insect eating birds.
In fairness it doesn't really. Both articles acknowledge the method and accuracy of those tests that were carried out. There is still a big of a hangover from the ignorance of the old days when environmentalism was seen as being largely the preserve of hippies and drop outs, hence the language that creeps into these kind of issues.

It stands out for me that this was not funded and there are no reports of any official or private response at all.
 

Ardillaun

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A dreadful prospect, if confirmed by other studies, with obvious consequences for the whole biosphere. I worry in particular about insectivorous birds. Let’s hope it’s not accurate. It’s hard to believe that pesticides and habitat loss haven’t altered the insect population in multiple ways.
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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Farming and fishing have to change radically to save what's left of the world's wildlife. We are a sort of plague on the planet.
Speak for yourself ;D
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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first the insects disappear, then the whole ecosystem collapses in on itself. Mankind stands idly by and comments ''nothing to do with me govner'
 

JCR

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first the insects disappear, then the whole ecosystem collapses in on itself. Mankind stands idly by and comments ''nothing to do with me govner'
Ah shure its Christmas. We don't think about humankind's self destruction at the season of goodwill to all.

Well, except insects obviously.
 

Wagmore

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Insektensterben: Zahl der Insekten in Deutschland sinkt deutlich - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Sorry it's all in German, but the gist of it is that they Scientists set up these net-like or tent-like things to trap the insects in a nr of nature reserves, just to get a head-count. Results are a bit shocking.
This would tally with the decline in the bee population.
Pie have thread on that too!
http://www.politics.ie/forum/environment/248524-bees.html

I think there's also a decline in the nr of birds. Well if it's all about the birds and the bees, homo sapiens must be somewhere down the line.

Well something else to make you sit up straight and worry. Sorry Insectology is just humbug to me. And I don't know much about bees except that they are needed to polinate the fruit and veggies.
Why start a thread on it? Well I think it's important for pie readers to be aware of what's going on in the world out there that's not the world of men.
I blame the refubees.....
 

Turbinator

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Its a damming indictment of the several decades in which the Greens were in government in Germany - their farmland bird populations are in steep decline too!!:(
 

JCR

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Its a damming indictment of the several decades in which the Greens were in government in Germany - their farmland bird populations are in steep decline too!!:(
That's one of the worst troll attempts I've seen here - an achievement in itself. Congrats. :)
 

Shpake

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Sometimes these worries get bigger instead of smaller
Surpised that this hasn't got a mention no Pie... even RTE brought it up on their news.

Study: Insect species fall could be 'catastrophic' for Earth - CNN Video

Study: Insect species fall could be 'catastrophic' for Earth
More than 40% of insect species could become extinct in the next few decades, according to a new report co-authored by scientists from the universities of Sydney and Queensland and the China Academy of Agricultural Sciences.
Source: CNN
But I was thinking to myself: Just one/two weeks back the news was all about a massive heat wave in Australia (in the meantime they have massive rains)... Where? In South... I said South Australia -- away from the equator they had a record temperature reading of 46.6 degrees Celcius. Well that means 46.6 degrees in the shade. That's nearly half way to boiling point 100 degrees celcius. So if it's that hot in the shade, what's it like in the sun? I hope the insects can find enough space in the shade out their in the outback.
 

gandyalf

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Sometimes these worries get bigger instead of smaller
Surpised that this hasn't got a mention no Pie... even RTE brought it up on their news.

Study: Insect species fall could be 'catastrophic' for Earth - CNN Video



But I was thinking to myself: Just one/two weeks back the news was all about a massive heat wave in Australia (in the meantime they have massive rains)... Where? In South... I said South Australia -- away from the equator they had a record temperature reading of 46.6 degrees Celcius. Well that means 46.6 degrees in the shade. That's nearly half way to boiling point 100 degrees celcius. So if it's that hot in the shade, what's it like in the sun? I hope the insects can find enough space in the shade out their in the outback.
Some further reading:

Plummeting insect numbers 'threaten collapse of nature' | Environment | The Guardian

.
 


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