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Study on social housing policy could inform people on the government's planned spending on social housinf

patslatt

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Study on social housing policy could inform people on the government's planned spending on social housinf

See http://www.queensu.ca/iigr/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.iigrwww/files/files/conf/Arch/03/03-2/Hulchanski.pdf

Since it looks like the new government is going to go on a spending spree on social housing, studies like that in the link on social housing policy and practices are of interest.

Most OECD countries apart from the UK spend relatively little on social housing, possibly because it tends to concentrate the poorest in society in ghettos. As seen in muslim ghettos in the Banlieus of Paris and "sink estates" in the UK, undesirable social consequences result such as low education standards and high crime rates. Some of Ireland's social housing estates in Dublin have high crime rates, although many estates are architecturally attractive and good neighborhoods.

While private housing housed most people in the past, shortages of private sector houses are becoming acute in many big international cities, especially in capital cities with typically strong local economies.Dublin is no exception,going by the rise in homelessness in recent years.

Local governments in these cities tend to hobble housing development as councillors pander to home owners who have the highest voter turnouts in elections. Many of those home owners are NIMBYS whose residents' associations exploit planning laws to object to all new housing. Again, Dublin is no exception.

The resulting housing shortages have two basic solutions. First and most effective, central governments should impose strict housing building quotas on big cities through interventions in housing planning, though leaving local planning offices in place for local knowledge. Second, to the extent these quotas fail to resolve housing shortages, central governments should subsidise private housing construction to be sold or rented to low and moderate income people.
 
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ShoutingIsLeadership

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See http://www.queensu.ca/iigr/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.iigrwww/files/files/conf/Arch/03/03-2/Hulchanski.pdf

Since it looks like the new government is going to go on a spending spree on social housing, studies like that in the link on social housing policy and practices are of interest.

Most OECD countries apart from the UK spend relatively little on social housing, possibly because it tends to concentrate the poorest in society in ghettos. As seen in muslim ghettos in the Banlieus of Paris and "sink estates" in the UK, the result is often undesirable social consequences such as low education standards and high crime rates.

That said, in major urban centres in many countries, local governments hobble housing development as councillors pander to home owners who

...stop mid-sentence?
 


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