Survival strategy after Christmas

asset test

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Me too - down from 18 grand a year last year to under 14 now - still not as bad off as a lot I know and only myself and my cats to worry about - I am hoping on a sense of community to bring us through - plus this is a relatively peaceful society with a small population
Great to hear some positivity in adversity. Good on you!

Still, like many who have been made redundant for the first time, or who have massive debts, it is certainly not easy by any standards.

the coping classes again.
 


Electric Sheep

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God, all the "make do and mend" advice is frankly depressing. I was born into poverty---real poverty--and know how truly awful it is. It has no redeeming features. Playing at poverty can be fun---middle class "bring and borrow" evenings and so on--but the real thing is to be avoided at all costs.

I remember the "dinner parties" of the (relatively affluent) 70s and 80s. Everyone bringing their own bottle of undrinkable plonk. Chili con carne made from cheap mince. Someone recounting the adventures of some rich friend who actually owned a dishwasher--wow!---or who managed to get the price of a flight to Paris---yeah, Paris, wow!.
.......Never having enough hot water, or a Power shower, or any shower, car always breaking down and having to be towed, everything bought second-hand or if lucky "vintage", looking enviously at beautiful things one could never afford---beautiful simple glassware, heavy cotton sheets, a silk scarf, good leather shoes, a well-cut cashmere and wool coat, a weekend in Tuscany......

I remember the back-breaking work as a child of "grow your own"---freezing wet evenings spent digging spuds, or carrots and unions for the family table. Great days. Slipping back there feels like fun. Not.
God yeah. Except for the grow your own, that was my life. The chili, the spag bol and the lasagne, the height of cuisine. The lack of hot water, the freezing bedrooms, the not far off freezing rest of the house. The musty smell of clothes of a closet in an unheated bedroom. It sucked.
 

magherafelt

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look folks.... heat is a basic standard now, its not that hard to insulate your house, or expensive for that matter... I re insulated our attic for €100 (extra layer on-top of what was already there), and bought a few tubes of silicon sealant for around the windows around the house... some weren't v well sealed.

Secondly, I went to a local weaving place and bought off cuts of tweed for €10 per kilo. They come in long strips (approx 8" x 80").... I stitched them up to make a sleeve and stuffed them with odd bits of old material to make draft excluders for the base of the living room and kitchen doors. They look great and do a v good job.

Thirdly... get a chimney seal. If you have an open fire, make sure to close off your chimney when your fire is not in use. The wind sucks all the warm air out of your house when the fire is not in use....
 

Insole

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I think it's interesting that people are putting it in terms of after christmas. Maybe this is a psychological boundry. As if to say, lets have one good party, or one normal family period before all hell breaks loose. Of course it's already started for many people, but woe betide anyone who thinks the government will be there to help.
I think crime will escalate, lets face it, if even 2% of the population start to think it's okay to rob their neighbours then we're in for an avalanche of petty crime. But they'll be robbing for consumables this time or robbing valuable equipment to order.
Joking aside, I think it would be prudent to stock up on the canned food and LED torches/candles. If people stop paying their ESB in sufficient quantities there's no reason to believe that there won't be power shortages.
The one thing that I hope does come of all of this is for people to detach themselves from the mental bubblegum that they watch religously on TV each night and instead meet their neighbours. It's getting harder to avoid ones neighbours these days with everyone being laid off.
In a nutshell, the strategy should be to have as much food, fuel and emergency lighting in your house as you'd need to survive at least a week , register to vote, save like you are Scottish and become more neighbourly.
 

gatsbygirl20

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I may have gone a bit over the top but it does seem that many people do not realise that the Celtic Tiger bypassed a lot of Irish people.
No, you made a valid point, Realist. I still , even during the Tiger, felt like the kid with her face pressed to the window, who could never afford what so many seemed to regard as the "norm". I now realise of course that they couldn't afford it either. The whole mad party that I was not invited to, was fuelled by credit card hubris and froth.

But, having come up "the hard way" I am suspicious of those who claim that we will all enjoy getting back to simpler values, that getting our kids out there harvesting vegetables will be good for family life, that we can share bathwater and save energy......No, if you have to do these things, they no longer feel like worthy life-style choices, and become what they really are---awful, undignified drudgery where you see no way out, no hope....
Of course many people are living like that now...many always have....but many were sustained in the past by the burning ambition and hope that they would shake off this grinding, soul-destroying drudgery...not embrace it...
 

Superindigoman

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Why do you think Iceland have popped back? Cheap, budget frozen food, wasnt wanted or needed during the boom, they see a lot of new business coming there way.
 

glasto

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Sep 20, 2010
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I'm worried. I already make spag bol in bulk and make a chicken last three meals. What will I do when the real emergency starts?;)

I am planning a few raised veg beds for next year though. Has anyone got any good links for gardening for dummies, all I've grown is herbs and very tiny tomatoes.:)

Blimey, I just noticed the pin has a new 'Pinster Prepare' section!:eek:
 

theghost

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May 26, 2009
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As someone on the dole, here are my tips for survival.

If you roast a chicken for the Sunday dinner you can make a chicken pie or a curry with the remains the next day and use the carcase with veg to make a lovely soup for the day after. Bubble and squeak (mashed potatoes, boiled/steamed cabbage and a chopped raw onion mashed together and fried until golden in a little oil) is a firm favourite with my lot. Bangers and mash (yes - I was a Beano reader in the 60's) is another favourite. And you can't go far wrong with making home-made soup from seasonal veg. Also find a butcher who sells kidneys and liver - cheap and good for you.

The youngest daughter and son-in-law are finally getting their garden in order and we've come to an agreement that I'll grow tomatoes, runner beans and early and second cropping potatoes in the summer, and they'll grow carrots, onions, cabbage and brussels sprouts as well as a late cropping variety of potato. We'll share the crops.

Come June when the TV licence expires I'll get rid of the TV. In truth, I rarely watch it. I'm lucky in that I love reading and have a good collection of books that I can dip into when the library has nothing that appeals to me. For the grandchildren, I have a collection of board games (ludo and snakes and ladders for the younger ones, scrabble, monopoly and cluedo for the older) when they come over, and I have a collection of children's books bought from second hand or charity shops that they like to read. They get so engrossed in the games and books they don't want the TV on.
 

Luigi Vampa

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Jun 19, 2010
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What is wrong with people?


Are your prepared to go down without a fight? This nation can be saved, there are other ways but it needs people like YOU to get up and make a stand.
The Irish people have failed to stand together. It's everyman for himself. Good tips on this thread. Been doing most of them myself. Keep up the good work folks.

Argos do a good food (bacon) slicer for €35, you can buy cheap raw hams, bacons, and beef on offer in places like aldi and lidl for €5-10. You can roast them at home yourself and get a couple of dinners out of them, then use the food slicer to cut the rest for lunch sambo's, much cheaper that shop bought cooked sliced ham (and joint goes far further than cutting it with a knife yourself)
 
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hammer

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Jul 6, 2009
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The sales this year will start about 18th December. Speaking to retailers at present there is nothing selling and turnover is way down on last year.

Be brave and wait for the sales.

SAVE SAVE SAVE your hard earned money, because the Government want to get their hands on everything to cover up their total incompetence.
 

Paddythai

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Aug 30, 2009
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Realsitically, anyone who has skills and is young and single would be best off emigrating.
Those single, who are educated but no work experience could get a TEFL qualification and teach English in China, Korea, Japan etc.

Those with kids, qualifications and experience have to ensure they have an overseas contract where they can bring family for a few years.

Staying in Ireland to make a living is not ideal as there will be few opportunities to prosper in the forseeable future. If I could I would bring my kids to Canada where they would get a good education in a low crime pleasant country.
 

hammer

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We need the young well educated graduates to stay.

Who else will pay the taxes :)

We will have an aging population if the youth leave. We need Revenue to pay pensions :)
 


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