T.K Whitaker. Greatest Irishman ever ?

mmrebel

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About time is man had a thread for himself even though he still alive i keep hearing where are the T.K Whitaker's of our generation ?
Seeing as he was before my time all i can gather is whats on the web every politician that met seems to have held him in the highest esteem.
So who was he and was he really that influential??


Thomas Kenneth Whitaker was born in 1916 in Rostrevor, County Down. His Catholic mother, Jane O'Connor, came from Ballyguirey East, Labasheeda, Co. Clare, while his father was a local man. Due to his parents’ adherence to the Ne Temere decree,[citation needed] he was educated by the Christian Brothers in Drogheda and later obtained a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics, economics and Celtic studies. Whitaker also earned an M.Sc. Econ degree by private study from the University of London.

Whitaker applied to join the Irish Civil Service and was successively awarded first place in four civil service exams: Clerical Officer (1934), Executive Officer (1935), Assistant Inspector of Taxes (1937), and Administrative Officer (1938). In 1943, he was promoted to the rank of Assistant Principal Officer, and in 1947, Principal Officer.

In 1956 Whitaker was appointed Secretary at the Department of Finance at the age of thirty-nine, becoming the youngest ever person to hold this senior position. His surprise appointment took place at a time when Ireland's economy was in deep depression. Economic growth was non-existent, inflation apparently insoluble, unemployment rife, living standards low and emigration at a figure not far below the birth rate. Whitaker believed that free trade, with increased competition and the end of protectionism, would become inevitable and that jobs would have to be created by a shift from agriculture to industry and services. He formed a team of officials within the department (the "Whitaker Committee") and together they produced a detailed study of the economy, culminating in a plan recommending policies for improvement. The plan was accepted by the government and was transformed into a White Paper which became known as the First Programme for Economic Expansion, and somewhat unusually this was published with his name attached in November 1958. The programme, which became known as the "Grey Book", became a landmark in Irish economic history, primarily for its bold new ideas. This brought the stimulus of foreign investment into the Irish economy.

His influence was not confined to things economic alone, however. In 1965 he liaised with Jim Malley, private secretary to the Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, and was able to successfully organise the unprecedented meeting between Seán Lemass and Terence O'Neill.

Although Whitaker had left the Department of Finance in 1969, he remained policy advisor to Jack Lynch on matters concerning Northern Ireland. As a result, a document entitled 'The Constitutional Position of Northern Ireland in IV parts' was created, which analysed the historical development of the situation in Northern Ireland, the pro-partition view, the anti-partition view, and possible reconciliation between North and South.

Whitaker worked with the Ford Foundation to secure funding to launch the Economic and Social Research Institute of Ireland, and was its president from foundation for over fifteen years.

In 1977, the then Fianna Fáil Taoiseach Jack Lynch nominated Whitaker as a member of the 14th Seanad Éireann from 1977 to 1981, where he served as an independent (i.e. non-party) senator. In 1981 he was nominated to the 15th Seanad by the Fine Gael Taoiseach Garret FitzGerald, where he served until 1982. FitzGerald also appointed him to chair a Committee of Inquiry into the Irish penal system, and he also chaired a Parole Board or Sentence Review Group for several years.

He also served as Chancellor of the National University of Ireland from 1976 to 1996. He was also President of the Royal Irish Academy .

He has had a very strong love for the Irish language throughout his career and the seminal collection of Irish poetry, An Duanaire: Poems of the Dispossessed 1600-1900

He also won the "Greatest Living Irish Person" award in 2002 and In 2001, an RTÉ programme voted Whitaker the "Irishman of the 20th Century", beating all our illustrious revolutionary's hands down.

T.K. Whitaker

T. K. Whitaker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An interview with him from RTE

RTÉ News: One to One

 


the king

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His intelligence came from his protestant father I would say...
 

CookieMonster

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I had the pleasure of meeting him last year.
 

TommyO'Brien

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I don't like categorising people into who was the greatest. Whittaker was undoubtedly in my view one of the greatest.
 

Cato

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One of the greatest recent Irishmen, but hardly THE greatest ever.
 

Nem

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Fantastic that he is still alive. He has left much of his archive at UCD: T.K. Whitaker

To appreciate his role check Paul Bew, Henry Patterson, Seán Lemass and the making of modern Ireland, 1945-66 (London, 1982). Its old but IMHO still the best book on this period.
 

CookieMonster

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One of the greatest recent Irishmen, but hardly THE greatest ever.
No, that's Bertie's title. He has a mug with it on it and everything. Cowen gave it to him.
 

eoinod

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Well I think that the FG front bench has some talent that may prove to be of a Whittaker standard.

We need to get this government out asap though. The fact is that FF attract a mob with great ability at vote getting but little real intelligence.

For the future I would keep an eye out on George Lee and Varadkar. Whatever anyone can say those two (especially Varadkar) are possessed of incredible intellects and could prove great servants to the nation if given the opportunity.
 

CookieMonster

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Well I think that the FG front bench has some talent that may prove to be of a Whittaker standard.

We need to get this government out asap though. The fact is that FF attract a mob with great ability at vote getting but little real intelligence.

For the future I would keep an eye out on George Lee and Varadkar. Whatever anyone can say those two (especially Varadkar) are possessed of incredible intellects and could prove great servants to the nation if given the opportunity.
I agree to a certain extent. Both have shown they have a brain in their heads and that they're not afraid to use it, which is generally something you don't see often in Dáil Éireann.
I like lee but I've not seen enough of him to make a call yet. Varadkar is an odious little whelp though. He's got a ferret like personality, which is not altogether useless combined with his onvious smarts but he's neither a diplomat nor a statesman the same way Whitaker was/is.
 

wombat

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I don't like categorising people into who was the greatest. Whittaker was undoubtedly in my view one of the greatest.
Its an interesting concept but Irishmn who had a world influence but are rarely mentioned are Hamilton, Boyle, Reynolds, Parsons, Walton (all Protestants)
 

wombat

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Its an interesting concept but Irishmn who had a world influence but are rarely mentioned are Hamilton, Boyle, Reynolds, Parsons, Walton (all Protestants)
Sorry but I forgot Holland, the ex Christian Brother
 

the king

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I think Protestant Irishmen have been Irelands greatest achievers
 

LINUSSdad

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Whitaker with bigest achivements I agree but v.important imo Noel Browne and John Hume.
 

Keith-M

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One of the greatest recent Irishmen, but hardly THE greatest ever.
There may have been others who had more ability, more sense of public service, cleverer or more politically astute but Whitaker actually helped the country more than any other Irishman.
 
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eoinod

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Its an interesting concept but Irishmn who had a world influence but are rarely mentioned are Hamilton, Boyle, Reynolds, Parsons, Walton (all Protestants)
Edmonde Burke was fairly influential as well.
 

MrYouGoBoss

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I think Protestant Irishmen have been Irelands greatest achievers
ya, the ol oppression set us katliks back a few years, but wasnt that the whole point? but any who, those ol mighty prods sure have fallen ha, throwing piss on school children and what not, its a real shame.
 
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Eldritch

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"I think Protestant Irishmen have been Irelands greatest achievers"

Yes because we all know that becoming a protestant automatically enlarges a person (the prods do this by sprinkling holy boyne water on each other).
 

ruserious

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Happy 100th Birthday to T.K Whitaker!
 


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