Taking advantage of Brexit - let's revisit 'Decentralisation'

The_SR

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I'd envisage about half the civil service being transplanted. The obvious towns are Sligo, Castlebar, Tralee, Clonmel, Wexford. Letterkenny is too remote. Ennis and Kilkenny too prosperous. lime%ick and Waterford have enough diversity to take advantage of a growing economy.
I have no connection to any place named here.
Why auld anyone want to leave Dublin for Conmel?
 


ON THE ONE ROAD

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Why auld anyone want to leave Dublin for Conmel?
dublin rent prices. A civil servant starting out in dublin would want to be still living at home or have a nice aunt who refuses to take money or not mind sharing in an over crowded fire trap.
 

Half Nelson

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Decentralise RTE. Then perhaps other regions can compete when Dublin loses its own state-backed public relations company.
 

Spanner Island

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Charlie McCreevy attempted in the early naughties to disperse growth to the regions with his audacious 'decentralisation' program. Many senior civil servants were aghast at this idea of forced dispersion to the sticks and the program was greatly diluted.

One of the main obstacles cited against Dublin taking advantage of a bankers flight from London is a dearth of appropriate high-end accommodation. Much of our mid level upwards state functionaries are living in Clontarf,Terenure,Stillorgan etc and if these properties became availabe would command a premium rental price which would provide for a very high maintenance lifestyle in the sticks to compensate for any inconvenience caused by leaving bloated, expensive Dublin.

An initiative such as decentralisation would greatly assist in arresting the decline that many regional centres are continuing to feel with growth c^ntered in a very narrow expanse of the state.
https://irelandafternama.wordpress.com/2011/11/18/tactics-without-strategy-decentralisation-and-post-decentralisation/ and
https://www.wort.lu/en/business/relocation-irish-bid-for-brexit-business-hobbled-by-housing-transport-woes-5788e29cac730ff4e7f638c9

There's a very narrow window to act decisively to increase our advantages and win the potential rewards that other European cities are sizing up.
Not going to happen.

Regardless... the prospect of waves of w*nker bankers and various other financial 'sector' vermin arriving in Ireland as a result of the Brexit shambles doesn't fill me with joy tbh... and will only exacerbate the housing crisis we've already got among other things...

Let them f*** off to somewhere else... Paris, Frankfurt... wherever...
 

The_SR

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Clonmel is a nice town? With a good educate together school?

They have a cousin living in a townland on the outskirts?

They've been offered lots of relocation money?
So you are happy to forcibly move tens of thousands of people, possibly away from their families, on the basis it's cheaper to live in the sticks? And BREXIT.
 

wombat

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So you are happy to forcibly move tens of thousands of people, possibly away from their families, on the basis it's cheaper to live in the sticks? And BREXIT.
Outside d'internet, no one will suggest "forcibly move tens of thousands... to live in the sticks":lol:
 

GDPR

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So you are happy to forcibly move tens of thousands of people, possibly away from their families, on the basis it's cheaper to live in the sticks? And BREXIT.
Ireland is a small country . It might force the civil servants to actually give us proper high speed transport links and dependable connections. And so what if someone is 3 hours drive from family ? Knowing Ireland he might be 2 hours away in Dublin traffic yet see them only once a year regardless. That sort of argument means nobody from Stillorgan should ever move to Howth etc . Thanks to the country being very badly run , plenty of families are already separated by continents.
 

razorblade

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So you are happy to forcibly move tens of thousands of people, possibly away from their families, on the basis it's cheaper to live in the sticks? And BREXIT.
So there's plenty of people living away from their families, some as far away in Australia, so moving to a different part of a tiny island, shouldn't be too much of a problem to to be able to cope with, there's no move than a 2 or 3 hour journey to get to most places on this island, so you shouldn't have too much trouble visiting them on a regular basis.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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Ireland is a small country . It might force the civil servants to actually give us proper high speed transport links and dependable connections. And so what if someone is 3 hours drive from family ? Knowing Ireland he might be 2 hours away in Dublin traffic yet see them only once a year regardless. That sort of argument means nobody from Stillorgan should ever move to Howth etc . Thanks to the country being very badly run , plenty of families are already separated by continents.
who do people vote for who advocate high speed transport and dependable connections?

It is seen for right or wrong as a safer bet for those with capital to invest in the city of london over ventures in this state outside dublin such as the infrastructure you are talking about.

It will take an ideological shift to get the state into the building required. There is no sign of it happening. even with all the brexit talk.
 

Schuhart

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Clanrickard

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Meaningless topic. We've already moved large numbers of civil servants out of Dublin. Many regional towns already have large public sector payrolls.

http://www.politics.ie/forum/economy/129392-geography-public-sector-pay.html#post2662569

This is another of those threads where someone mentions a failed regional development strategy as if it hadn't already been implemented.
It wasn't the strategy. It was that it was a badly implemented strategy. We could start by cutting down the number of local authorities to 6 or 7. That would help consolidate some of the larger settlements like Cork Limerick and Galway.We really should be aiming for a Cork population of 400,000 or so to balance against Dublin.
 

Deadlock

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It wasn't the strategy. It was that it was a badly implemented strategy. We could start by cutting down the number of local authorities to 6 or 7. That would help consolidate some of the larger settlements like Cork Limerick and Galway.We really should be aiming for a Cork population of 400,000 or so to balance against Dublin.
I agree - with similar population levels in Limerick and Galway. That would begin to rebalance.

Do away with the county structure and institute proper meaningful reagions based on the cities.
 

The_SR

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So there's plenty of people living away from their families, some as far away in Australia, so moving to a different part of a tiny island, shouldn't be too much of a problem to to be able to cope with, there's no move than a 2 or 3 hour journey to get to most places on this island, so you shouldn't have too much trouble visiting them on a regular basis.
So let's break up families into two households so they will save money because of Brexit. Thanks for explaining
 

Half Nelson

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Ireland is a small country, but there are too many Dublin-based narrow minds intent on making it even smaller.

We should, by now, have a population of 8million plus and a transport infrastructure that's not from the seventies.
 


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