Taxpayer indemnifying private medical consultants

Lumpy Talbot

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Mm. But isn't this what the crippled Republic is for? Indemnifying our betters against any costs and making sure the chances are they'll end up wealthy?

Surely that is what the conservative counter-Revolution was all about.
 


Lumpy Talbot

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Far as I am aware despite all his piss and vinegar Michael Noonan only ever lost the plot once with the Troika.

Oddly enough it was around the time that the Troika wished to discuss certain obvious cartels in Irish public life.

And of course heading in that direction in Ireland is a career-halter for a politician.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Doesn't matter whether public or private, the taxpayer is there at all times to cover up medical malpractice.

No politician as far as I am aware has ever tabled a question in the Oireachtas asking in round figures how much the HSE or Department of Health have paid out to soothe the dummies of consultants and doctors who in certain cases would look no better at science that a New Guinean tribesman.

Anyone ever see anything about the female doctor at GUH who thought she could tell the difference between a 49% chance of fatality in a pregnant woman or a 51% chance of fatality in the same pregnant woman?

I doubt she has been called to Johns Hopkins to explain this fantastic revolution in diagnosis that isn't available to any other medical system in the world.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Public money is utilised constantly to save the blushes of inept lunatics in the Irish health system.

This has been going on for decades.
 

Sweet Darling

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Mm. But isn't this what the crippled Republic is for? Indemnifying our betters against any costs and making sure the chances are they'll end up wealthy?

Surely that is what the conservative counter-Revolution was all about.
Pro
Doesn't matter whether public or private, the taxpayer is there at all times to cover up medical malpractice.

No politician as far as I am aware has ever tabled a question in the Oireachtas asking in round figures how much the HSE or Department of Health have paid out to soothe the dummies of consultants and doctors who in certain cases would look no better at science that a New Guinean tribesman.

Anyone ever see anything about the female doctor at GUH who thought she could tell the difference between a 49% chance of fatality in a pregnant woman or a 51% chance of fatality in the same pregnant woman?

I doubt she has been called to Johns Hopkins to explain this fantastic revolution in diagnosis that isn't available to any other medical system in the world.
Problem is, the victims go into court to get "justice" but as soon as a big settlement with no admission of guild, is dangled on front of their face.
the principal goes out the window.
Money solves all problems.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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That principle is certainly visible in the number of settlements made in conjunction with non-disclosure agreements particularly by the HSE but of course it is a well trodden path which winds around transparency and accountability quite nicely.
 

ruman

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Problem is, the victims go into court to get "justice" but as soon as a big settlement with no admission of guild, is dangled on front of their face.
the principal goes out the window.
Money solves all problems.
Actually that's false ,generally they'll go to court to have the funds to pay for the care they will require due to the incompetence of a halfwit doctor. The consultant being too busy dealing with his private patients meaning they have to deal with some inadequately vetted clown hired by the incompetent HSE.

Ironically if the salaries of medical staff didnt keep rising so much the size of awards wouldnt. Funnily enough the doctors whinging about insurance costs dont mention this too much.
 

ruman

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"Payouts have totalled €108 million for the first five months of 2019 ." Bumper crop time for insurance lawyers.
No surprise , when you operate a policy of non disclosure and apply a deny and delay approach to failings, learnings cant be applied. The inevitable consequence is more repeat errors and consequnetly payouts.

Of course minimising errors would reduce fees for solicitors and medical professionals who are utterly coining it preparing " medical expert" reports for all these cases.
Anazing how the medical profession manage to go under the radar on this lucrative side business
 


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