'Teach anger management in schools' - Archbishop Martin.

the secretary

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There is reportedly a growing knife culture creeping in among our teenagers with many of them said to be carrying knives for protection and because it's cool.
Also there is a growing problem of respect and lack of control out there with teenagers and even younger children seemingly becoming increasingly difficult to manage and deal with.

Archbishop Martin today said that this is a problem that schools must address.
Is it the responsibility of schools to teach self control?

Is the current situation the result of poor parenting, lack of government investment, having to deal with celtic tiger babies or are schools neglecting their duties towards their students?

IMO Archbishop Martin is completely wrong. It's not the duty of schools to teacher manners, respect or self control.

This is something that should be shown at home. Schools have enough to deal with as regards overcrowding, lack of investment, staffing numbers, legalities blocking them from dealing with disruptive students and industrial disputes.

Is this a growing problem among our young or will it be alright with out a proper plan to deal with it?
 


stopdoingstuff

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undermine the family for a few generations and this is what you get.
 

Mercurial

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[video=youtube;fKy7ljRr0AA]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKy7ljRr0AA[/video]
 

GDPR

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Anger management? :rolleyes:

Seriously for a supposed Prince of the Church he is again being an utter worlding; why anger management and not the Wrath of Almighty God?

The warrior spirit in boys given the nature of this fallen world is something that should be nurtured though in a controlled fashion, i.e. channelling into sports like boxing, fencing, karate and hurling.
 

the secretary

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Now maybe, but give it a few years and we'll see.
 

Analyzer

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Your country is insolvent.

Don't get angry.

Get even.

Take it out on the maFFia & Meehaul Martin, as often as possible
 

Equinox

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I fundamentally disagree with this proposal. It seems that parents in increasing numbers have utterly abdicated any responsibility for raising their children.
Schools and teachers are there to teach not parent, if a parent refuses to raise their own children they should be made responsible for their failure.

This is not exclusive to the lumpen proletariat either. I knew a person that worked in a full service (the even brought kids to dentist and doctors appointments) upscale nursery in a posh part of Dublin, kids would be returned to the nursery in the morning in the same filthy nappy they left in by parents without the time or inclination to bother with parenting.

The responsibility and blame for children raised with no moral code, sense of right or wrong and present a danger to others needs to fall where it belongs, and so does the punishment.
 

GrainneDee

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There is reportedly a growing knife culture creeping in among our teenagers with many of them said to be carrying knives for protection and because it's cool.
Also there is a growing problem of respect and lack of control out there with teenagers and even younger children seemingly becoming increasingly difficult to manage and deal with.

Archbishop Martin today said that this is a problem that schools must address.
Is it the responsibility of schools to teach self control?

Is the current situation the result of poor parenting, lack of government investment, having to deal with celtic tiger babies or are schools neglecting their duties towards their students?

IMO Archbishop Martin is completely wrong. It's not the duty of schools to teacher manners, respect or self control.

This is something that should be shown at home. Schools have enough to deal with as regards overcrowding, lack of investment, staffing numbers, legalities blocking them from dealing with disruptive students and industrial disputes.

Is this a growing problem among our young or will it be alright with out a proper plan to deal with it?
All down to the schools again....
 

GrainneDee

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+1
Attack the symptom, not the problem.
Of course the schools can help. And are already trying - that's what they spend their time doing, trying to get young people to treat others with respect. Their rules are designed to bring this out in young people. But parents and society need to step up to the plate.
 

Kilbarry

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Crime Then and Now

Things are substantially better now in terms of law and order than they were a few generations ago.
Strange that. About a decade ago the old Sunday Tribune reported that the previous year 2005 had seen the highest number of homicides in the history of the State - at least since the Civil War years.

I also seem to recall a "strange but true" type article from the 1990s where the journalist wrote that "organised crime" was not actually a VERY recent concept. He said that it was used by the Gardai in the 1950s to refer to incidents like a farmer's barn being burned down in the course of a feud. I guess that was in contrast to the more usual type of "violent" crime - such as a drunken fistfight!

Of course there may have been heroin epedemics and lots of deaths from AIDS in the 1950s also - but it was all covered up!
 

the secretary

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Of course the schools can help. And are already trying - that's what they spend their time doing, trying to get young people to treat others with respect. Their rules are designed to bring this out in young people. But parents and society need to step up to the plate.
School's get students that are even too far gone by the time they get to second level.
Most schools have a good moral code and rules to back it up but parents need to ensure that students abide by these rules and back school management when problems arise.
This all comes from the example shown at home and parents should not look for someone to blame once things get out of hand.
 

GDPR

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Of course the schools can help. And are already trying - that's what they spend their time doing, trying to get young people to treat others with respect. Their rules are designed to bring this out in young people. But parents and society need to step up to the plate.
Grainne do you think that teachers should be allowed to use corporal punishment in a limited and disciplined away?
 

GrainneDee

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School's get students that are even too far gone by the time they get to second level.
Most schools have a good moral code and rules to back it up but parents need to ensure that students abide by these rules and back school management when problems arise.
This all comes from the example shown at home and parents should not look for someone to blame once things get out of hand.
In fairness, sometimes despite good parenting and good support at school, you still get problems. Either down to individual kids being rebellious, or hanging out with the wrong types. Within the one family you can get massive variations of behaviour. You can't always blame the parents.
 


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