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Tesco blame falling Irish sales on the property tax!


Berchmans

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Joined
Nov 23, 2009
Messages
502
It seems as though "Treasure Island/Ireland" is not quite as lucrative as it once was for Tesco.

Tesco blames property tax for fall in Irish sales · Business ETC

They are blaming the property tax for a “significant reduction in consumer sentiment and spending” in this country. Well Tesco, perhaps you could reverse this process by lowering your prices somewhat. It is well within your power.

There are contributors here who state that for supermarket prices to fall there must be a reduction in the spending power, i.e. the wages, of their customer base. Well, for a large number of people, incomes have been on the decline since 2008, yet apart from a period of deflation in 2010, supermarket prices have gone on rising. The effects of (alleged) cartelisation in the supermarket sector may outweigh the effects of falling incomes. After all, people still have to eat regardless of their income.

So, is there a significant portion of the population who "haven't taken a hit" who are keeping supermarket revenues buoyant and prices on the rise? Or is there an effective cartel among the major supermarkets keeping prices artificially high in this country? I refer in particular to the annoying gimmick of "price matching" with their competitors in Ireland, rather than trying to undercut their competitors prices.

Or are Tesco underplaying the effect of the horse DNA scandal?
 

Dunlin3

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Jan 31, 2009
Messages
3,182
Tescos should be looking over their shoulders at Aldi and Lidl for the reason for their drop in sales. Rarely shop in Tescos anymore myself.
 

Ribeye

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Jul 12, 2011
Messages
26,306
Tescos should be looking over their shoulders at Aldi and Lidl for the reason for their drop in sales. Rarely shop in Tescos anymore myself.
Me neither, in fact I never do,

Hey Tesco, is the Irish Property Tax hurting UK sales too,

@BBCBreaking: Supermarket giant #Tesco reports fall in UK sales over past three months BBC News - Tesco reports fall in UK sales

Lol:)

Lidl products are much tastier, much better value!
 

Congalltee

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Nov 10, 2009
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6,211
Anyone who buys foreign goods in multinational supermarket chains forfeits the right to complain about unemployment, emigration, cutbacks and tax rises. Discuss.
 

pippakin

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Feb 22, 2010
Messages
9,665
If people have less money they spend less it's hardly rocket science. The days of spending on credit card must also have dropped here.

The horse meat scandal may have affected sales of processed food and burgers but that wouldn't prevent people shopping in one store more than another since every supermarket and all the big brands were involved.

I have stopped buying processed food for the time being but when/if I do buy again, and I was never much of a consumer, it's more likely to be at a big store like Tesco than smaller ostensibly cheaper stores who may pay less attention to checks and balances.
 

Taxi Driver

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Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
4,296
The household charge last year was €100. The average property tax this year is €150.

Across 1.7 million households that is an increase of around €85 million. We spend around €7.5 billion a year on food (excluding eating out), around €3 billion on clothes, around €2 billion on non-durable household goods, €6 billion on alcohol, €2 billion on cigarettes.

The property tax increase is equal to 0.4% of that expenditure.
 

emulator

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Joined
Oct 20, 2010
Messages
10,262
This is horseshíte.... :)

The reason Tesco's sales are down is due to people no longer shopping there after horse meat was found in their products....

It will take them quite a while to regain a lot of them if ever. The Aldi / Lidl angle is no doubt also having an effect too....
 

realistic1

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Joined
Jun 27, 2008
Messages
11,476
Tescos should be looking over their shoulders at Aldi and Lidl for the reason for their drop in sales. Rarely shop in Tescos anymore myself.
Looking at my shopping bills for Aldi & Lidl, they also seem to be on the increase big time. They are still cheaper than Tesco.
 

sic transit

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Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,579
It's just a commentary about current disposable income. On Tesco itself I go there one week out of 4 or 5 or when I get my Clubcard points. I've also found myself returning to Dunnes recently as well. There's something about those soulless sheds that Tesco builds that is increasingly unattractive. I find that Lidl/Aldi and supporting some of my local shops addresses the majority of my food needs.
 

emulator

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Oct 20, 2010
Messages
10,262
Anyone who buys foreign goods in multinational supermarket chains forfeits the right to complain about unemployment, emigration, cutbacks and tax rises. Discuss.
What about foreign goods in an Irish supermarket.... would that be alright ?

Or Irish goods in a foreign MNC supermarket.... would that be alright ?

Things aren't that simple....

Can you imagine what we'd be paying for groceries here if Aldi / Lidl hadn't set up here.... ? We'd still be getting fleeced by our fine local businesses....
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
50,459
An example of every little helping in Tesco:

Baby Liga was €1.99 per pack, but shot up to €2.53 (approx), overnight.

After the minimum legal time period in which a product had to be at a certain price, before it could be reduced and advertised as a reduction, it was 'on offer' at €2.

The above are approximations. I might add that Dunnes did something similar.
 

richie268

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Sep 14, 2007
Messages
2,160
Anybody notice Superquinn selling farmed salmon from Scotland?
 

Oriel27

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Apr 25, 2008
Messages
286
It's just a commentary about current disposable income. On Tesco itself I go there one week out of 4 or 5 or when I get my Clubcard points. I've also found myself returning to Dunnes recently as well. There's something about those soulless sheds that Tesco builds that is increasingly unattractive. I find that Lidl/Aldi and supporting some of my local shops addresses the majority of my food needs.
yes but do you not find the Club card thing in Tescos a complete scandal?
I recently signed up for it a few weeks ago. one gets a point per every pound spend. Surely there is not much incentive in that. ASDA don't have the point system, they give the cut prices up front.
 

Franzoni

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Mar 3, 2010
Messages
16,469
Anyone who buys foreign goods in multinational supermarket chains forfeits the right to complain about unemployment, emigration, cutbacks and tax rises. Discuss.

Watch you family eat healthy on a budget by shopping in Aldi of Lidl for half of what you would spend in other shops...mainly because of corrupt politicans and a select cabal of carpetbaggers at the top of Irish society who can't (won't) run this country to provide sustainable employment and a decent income for a population of less than five million people..

Instead do bubble/boom or bust economics every 20 years or so while living off the cream of the profits, socializing the debts and not suffering the consequences....


Discuss
 

paulp

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Joined
May 5, 2007
Messages
7,324
Anyone who buys foreign goods in multinational supermarket chains forfeits the right to complain about unemployment, emigration, cutbacks and tax rises. Discuss.
Posters should start new threads rather than steer current threads onto a different topic. Discuss.
 

Franzoni

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Mar 3, 2010
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16,469
It sounds to me that Treasure Island isn't so 'Treasury' after all for these people...........:)

Who would of thought..... a positive side effect from the property tax.....:D
 

Pat Gill

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I don't shop much at Tesco simply because they don't sell what I want to buy, the arrogance of attempting to force people to buy what they want to sell annoys me more than anything.

That didn't work for Walmart in the states either.
 

Mitsui2

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Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
33,382
What about foreign goods in an Irish supermarket.... would that be alright ?

Or Irish goods in a foreign MNC supermarket.... would that be alright ?

Things aren't that simple....

Can you imagine what we'd be paying for groceries here if Aldi / Lidl hadn't set up here.... ? We'd still be getting fleeced by our fine local businesses....
And to be fair there's a hell of a lot of excellent Irish fresh produce in Aldi & Lidl.
 

DuineEile

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Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
14,939
It seems as though "Treasure Island/Ireland" is not quite as lucrative as it once was for Tesco.

Tesco blames property tax for fall in Irish sales · Business ETC

They are blaming the property tax for a “significant reduction in consumer sentiment and spending” in this country. Well Tesco, perhaps you could reverse this process by lowering your prices somewhat. It is well within your power.

There are contributors here who state that for supermarket prices to fall there must be a reduction in the spending power, i.e. the wages, of their customer base. Well, for a large number of people, incomes have been on the decline since 2008, yet apart from a period of deflation in 2010, supermarket prices have gone on rising. The effects of (alleged) cartelisation in the supermarket sector may outweigh the effects of falling incomes. After all, people still have to eat regardless of their income.

So, is there a significant portion of the population who "haven't taken a hit" who are keeping supermarket revenues buoyant and prices on the rise? Or is there an effective cartel among the major supermarkets keeping prices artificially high in this country? I refer in particular to the annoying gimmick of "price matching" with their competitors in Ireland, rather than trying to undercut their competitors prices.

Or are Tesco underplaying the effect of the horse DNA scandal?

Perhaps if Tesco broke out their Sales figures and their P n L figures from their UK figures we could judge for ourselves. Until they do that, it is just whining from a secretive company about something we cannot be in a position to judge.

Kinda like the UK Daily Nail scandal. Apparently it's HUGE, it's just that they can't tell us about it.


Tossers.



D
 

Keith-M

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Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
15,779
Website
www.allkindsofeverything.ie
Anyone who buys foreign goods in multinational supermarket chains forfeits the right to complain about unemployment, emigration, cutbacks and tax rises. Discuss.
Ah yes, because everyone who works in a multinational supermarket is not Irish, no Irish goods are sold in them and they don't pay any tax in Ireland. Seriously, you should try engaging your brain before going of on a silly rant!
 
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