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The best degrees to have for finding employment


Quebecoise

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Jun 21, 2011
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375
Yes, but what do Historical & philosophical studies (No.8) graduates do when they complete their studies? It would be nice to see the breakdown of the types of careers each group is involved in.
 

dresden8

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The important part is found work or went onto further studies.

Professional students don't count.

For anything.
 

stakerwallace

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Science is a great option and do a Masters also: many doors to open afterwards.
 

GDPR

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Yes, but what do Historical & philosophical studies (No.8) graduates do when they complete their studies? It would be nice to see the breakdown of the types of careers each group is involved in.
TS Eliot worked as merchant banker in the City; the author of The Wind in the Willows was the head of the Bank of England.

There are lots of areas for a history and philosophy graduate.
 

Thomaso12

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Sep 25, 2012
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Seems is based in uk. But I can't understand why history, law and lanauage is up there since most of them in uk who have those types of degrees are unemployed
 

Maction

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Sep 26, 2011
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453
My undergrad is in the Liberal Arts...got myself an entry level job then continued to study while working (to pay for my fees). Finished by Msc last Christmas. Since got a new job (very good pay and conditions). Actually very surprised how often my Arts background came up in interviews (history and philosophy). My problem solving ability is good by all accounts!

Guess what I am saying is be prepared to enter a profession/career at entry level no matter your background and just work hard (put you money where you mouth is if need be)
 

GDPR

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Seems is based in uk. But I can't understand why history, law and lanauage is up there since most of them in uk who have those types of degrees are unemployed
Where do you get your stats to say that most history, law and language graduates are unemployed?

The Telegraph's figures are based on data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency
The subjects on this list have been ranked using data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

Rankings are according to the number of respondents who say they are in work or further education within six months of graduation as a percentage out of all those who are either in or seeking work or further education. It does not include students who declared themselves to be "not available for employment". For the full data visit the HESA website.
 

Amnesiac

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Oct 27, 2011
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I wonder how many of the historical and philosophy students went on to ''further studies" when they couldn't find a job? Could be a very large number. Say 50% got jobs and 40% did an MA or a conversion course to something with better employment prospects. That gets us to 90%.
 

Analyzer

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Feb 14, 2011
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These statistics are relevant for Britain.

Law makes it to number 3 in Britain. In Ireland we have too many qualified lawyers, and too many legal graduates. A certain element of it is is snobbery permeating into teenagers from older relatives. Teaching has a 95% fill rate within 6 months of graduation. This is not the case here in IMF-land.

The main difference between here and the UK would be with respect to Computer Science, electronic engineering, and manufacturing engineering. Perhaps also accountancy/banking/finance would be in more demand here, because in Ireland employers are less likely to hire people because they went to a brand name university, and more interested in the knowledge base.
 

RahenyFG

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Perhaps that survey is more relevant for the UK. History and especially Philosophical degrees don't go too far here. Know a lad with a Masters degree in Philosophy. Got it 5 years ago and can't get anything with here. He's currently working in retail.

In Ireland, safe degrees right now are business, law, IT, sciences, agriculture and maths.
 

Johnnybaii

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I have a serious problem with the way further education and employment are viewed in Ireland "... But I have a degree, I deserve a job that pays X".

Horse************************.

Hardworking, driven people with initiative will always prosper.
 

Kev408

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Not relevant to us.
 

oggy

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Oct 28, 2009
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I have three degrees, one in english and one in maths and still cannot get a job

Parents and children in secondary upwards should learn one lesson from the current recession, study the jobs market and work out what jobs have managed to shelter themselves. Also learn from the lesson of those who jumped into the construction and fell by the wayside when the crash came
 

GDPR

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I have three degrees, one in english and one in maths and still cannot get a job

Parents and children in secondary upwards should learn one lesson from the current recession, study the jobs market and work out what jobs have managed to shelter themselves. Also learn from the lesson of those who jumped into the construction and fell by the wayside when the crash came
Oggy, I am sorry to hear you cannot find a job. Have you thought of getting an accountancy degree, using your maths ability? I know accountancy is really boring but maybe in Ireland most accountancy grads have no trouble finding employment. There is always a need for accountants in Britland

Good luck anyway.
 

dresden8

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Ireland is up to it's t1ts in out of work solicitors and barristers.

Those in the know have fewer problems though.

Such is life.
 

stakerwallace

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Feb 27, 2011
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Perhaps that survey is more relevant for the UK. History and especially Philosophical degrees don't go too far here. Know a lad with a Masters degree in Philosophy. Got it 5 years ago and can't get anything with here. He's currently working in retail.

In Ireland, safe degrees right now are business, law, IT, sciences, agriculture and maths.
Philosophy degrees are always going to be difficult: employement limited even with a Ph.d. Academic environment is barren enough and teaching at second level is not really an option unless you are a Jesuit.
 

stakerwallace

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Feb 27, 2011
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Any degree will do, if one knows the " right" people........
Primary teaching is ok but not for the moment, however the demography is favourable. Don't forget to bring an honour in Irish from the LC though, and that will remain for the foreseeable future.
 

RahenyFG

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Jun 17, 2010
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I have a serious problem with the way further education and employment are viewed in Ireland "... But I have a degree, I deserve a job that pays X".

Horse************************.

Hardworking, driven people with initiative will always prosper.
Yeah there's too much of this arrogance and snobbery coming from undergraduate/graduate students. 'I have a degree, I'm great, I'm going to make loads of money, I'm better than you'.
 
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