The coming age of internet censorship

Mr B

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
38
In Internet history, 1994-2004 was the era of the pioneers. 2004-2007 was the era of the merchants. Now we’re entering the era of the bullies. Everywhere in the world, sites are going dark, arrests are increasing, more people are going to prison. The Web just celebrated its 20th birthday. Nobody used to take it seriously, but those days are gone.

Germany's lower house passed the first Western national internet censorship law.
Italy is right up there with Beijing and Shanghai, where cybercafés are required by law to check the IDs of every single client. In Kazakhstan at the moment, people are strongly advised not to publish the words “economic crisis” online. The president doesn’t want them to.
Great Britain is preparing to monitor and archive all electronic communications in the name of the War on Terror. In France, the battle between the government and Internet users is over the downloading of copyrighted material.

When the dust settles on the legal battlefields, there remains an unequal power relationship: governments and Internet service providers (ISP) now have the technological means to detect and block access to sites they find objectionable on a countrywide scale

http://www.herdict.org/web/
The coming age of internet censorship - Wikileaks


http://www.herdict.org/web/
 


Captain Con O'Sullivan

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2009
Messages
985
There's no doubt in my mind that governments hate the internet with a passion, despite all the coo-ing noises it makes about empowerment by broadband.

It is a major method of communication which they can't control. They had broadcast journalism and the broadsheets sorted years ago when both politicians and press started the garbage promoted by PR agencies that there should be 'relations' built up between the two industries. The print press traditionally have aligned themselves with parties or been the willing water-carriers for whatever the government wants the people to think at any time. In return the print press get thrown the odd political bone every now and again to keep them interested.

The internet changes all that and has recently been instrumental in winning a US presidential campaign, destroying the far too comfortable and corrupt expenses system in the British parliament and is making life difficult for the Fianna Fail old guard who must hate the blogosphere with a passion at this point in time.

National and International Governments would like nothing better than to find a way of controlling the internet as a news medium.

Which is precisely why it should be resisted. It could be said that the Internet is the Fourth Estate, not traditional news sources who are nothing more than agencies for political parties at best.
 

MauriceColgan

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
7,640
Website
www.irelandtoo.com
Thanks Mr B and Capt Con O' Sulliven,

The Internet has become a very useful means of disemminating propaganda about a great many subjects close to my heart.

Researchers find my little efforts and next minute I'm on TV, Radio, or interviewed by the international press.

I firmly believe the truth asserts itself and when the logic used is irrefutable, minds are changed.

Isn't that so JCS? ;-)
 

FutureTaoiseach

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
7,980
Website
greatdearleader.blogspot.com
There's no doubt in my mind that governments hate the internet with a passion, despite all the coo-ing noises it makes about empowerment by broadband.

It is a major method of communication which they can't control. They had broadcast journalism and the broadsheets sorted years ago when both politicians and press started the garbage promoted by PR agencies that there should be 'relations' built up between the two industries. The print press traditionally have aligned themselves with parties or been the willing water-carriers for whatever the government wants the people to think at any time. In return the print press get thrown the odd political bone every now and again to keep them interested.

The internet changes all that and has recently been instrumental in winning a US presidential campaign, destroying the far too comfortable and corrupt expenses system in the British parliament and is making life difficult for the Fianna Fail old guard who must hate the blogosphere with a passion at this point in time.

National and International Governments would like nothing better than to find a way of controlling the internet as a news medium.

Which is precisely why it should be resisted. It could be said that the Internet is the Fourth Estate, not traditional news sources who are nothing more than agencies for political parties at best.
The internet is the Fifth Estate.
 

Electro

Member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
91
Liberal regimes (e.g. the West) have nothing to fear from the Internet. Except perhaps where those regimes have a pet peeve that they want to take to the Internet - e.g. Holocaust skepticism in the UK and Germany.

I don't expect an "age of Internet censorship" to be instigated by the West as you do.

There's a very big differences between "monitoring" and "censorship".

While some governments might be introducing Internet monitoring legislation, the truth is monitoring of the different forms of communication has been going on for a long time, and even pre-Internet was likely a lot more extensive than we have been told.

Monitoring is nothing new; indeed the Internet itself was designed by the US Military and is designed so that the top-level servers can read all information passing through it.

Transparency is great but it cuts both ways (e.g. data mining).
 
Last edited:

RasherHash

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
23,879
,mnkbjkklnk
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top