The cost of our educational élite - the top 100

ONQ

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From:

The top 100 best-paid in education - The Irish Times - Tue, Nov 09, 2010

At a time of unprecedented budget cuts and the possible return of third-level fees, SEAN FLYNN and PETER MCGUIRE reveal the salaries of the highest earners in Irish education

OVER 75 per cent of the €8.59 billion education budget is absorbed by pay and pensions. This means that all other education services must be funded from the €2.14 billion non-pay element of the budget. Overall, Ireland has one of the lowest levels of education spending in the OECD. It is ranked close to the bottom of international league tables when it comes to spending in relation to GDP.

The consequences of this under-investment are evident throughout the sector. It can be seen in dilapidated classrooms, lack of adequate support for information technology, meagre investment in early childhood education, lack of basic school facilities, and so on.

But a striking feature of the Irish education service is the relatively high rates of pay for academics and bureaucrats – especially at senior levels.

Today’s survey of the high earners in education comes amid increasing calls for a €100,000 cap on public service salaries. Many of those featured on this page point out they have already taken pay cuts and absorbed the public service pension levy. The universities say they need to pay the best to attract the best. But the top earners also include senior figures from the huge number of education quangos.
 


R

RepublicanSocialist1798

Looks like Heggers took another pay increase. Last year his pay allegedly rose to 170k.
 

Chrisco

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But to take your logic to its conclusion:

EU surveys also rate the Irish education system highly, and consider that Irish tax payers get the best return for their money of any European country, which, given the overall below average spend, would indicate that the staff do a great job under difficult circumstances.

Wouldn't that imply they are worth the spend?
 

He3

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The argument is that if we don't pay them so much they will go abroad. Now where did we here that before?
 

Sync

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"In a shock article today, the Times pointed out that in a country where civil servant and social welfare pay are well above international averages, a small number of civil servants receive pay well above international averages"

Also:

Fitzgerald may be Ireland’s highest-paid academic but he has actually seen his salary fall from €409,000 in the past year, as UCD came under pressure to justify his exceptional pay packet.

Headhunted from the College of Surgeons, UCD says research income has more than tripled under Fitzgerald’s watch. Critics say his salary level is inappropriate in a university facing severe budgetary cuts and one with debts of more than €12 million.
His critics are idiots.
 
B

birthday

But to take your logic to its conclusion:

EU surveys also rate the Irish education system highly, and consider that Irish tax payers get the best return for their money of any European country, which, given the overall below average spend, would indicate that the staff do a great job under difficult circumstances.

Wouldn't that imply they are worth the spend?
Do you think that it is appropriate for university presidents to create new highly paid positions for their personal friends and to provide massive pension enhancements to friends when retiring, all from the public purse?
 
B

birthday

From:

The top 100 best-paid in education - The Irish Times - Tue, Nov 09, 2010

At a time of unprecedented budget cuts and the possible return of third-level fees, SEAN FLYNN and PETER MCGUIRE reveal the salaries of the highest earners in Irish education

OVER 75 per cent of the €8.59 billion education budget is absorbed by pay and pensions. This means that all other education services must be funded from the €2.14 billion non-pay element of the budget. Overall, Ireland has one of the lowest levels of education spending in the OECD. It is ranked close to the bottom of international league tables when it comes to spending in relation to GDP.

The consequences of this under-investment are evident throughout the sector. It can be seen in dilapidated classrooms, lack of adequate support for information technology, meagre investment in early childhood education, lack of basic school facilities, and so on.

But a striking feature of the Irish education service is the relatively high rates of pay for academics and bureaucrats – especially at senior levels.

Today’s survey of the high earners in education comes amid increasing calls for a €100,000 cap on public service salaries. Many of those featured on this page point out they have already taken pay cuts and absorbed the public service pension levy. The universities say they need to pay the best to attract the best. But the top earners also include senior figures from the huge number of education quangos.
Does the list include Romulus and Remus from NIHE who were both presidents of NIHE Limerick at the same time?
 
B

birthday

The argument is that if we don't pay them so much they will go abroad. Now where did we here that before?
Maybe they can take up full time lectureships in more than one IT at the same time to enhance earnings. This did happen and the individual did not have to return a cent afaik.
I suppose they do this in Europe also!
 

wombat

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The argument is that if we don't pay them so much they will go abroad. Now where did we here that before?
What is really interesting are the jobs these high earners have - almost all are administrators/ presidents - I did not see a professor of mathematics or physics or agriculture listed among them although there are a couple of doctors who were tasked with increasing research. It is another example of the imbalance in our state sector where administrators are more highly valued than those in functional areas.
 

Sync

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What is really interesting are the jobs these high earners have - almost all are administrators/ presidents - I did not see a professor of mathematics or physics or agriculture listed among them although there are a couple of doctors who were tasked with increasing research. It is another example of the imbalance in our state sector where administrators are more highly valued than those in functional areas.
Of course they are. There are no fees in Ireland. Schools have to earn money. They're not administrators, they're Sales and Marketing. They're the people that bring in money. You've got a guy there who's tripled their research income. Of course he's worth more than a teaching professor.
 

wombat

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Of course they are. There are no fees in Ireland. Schools have to earn money. They're not administrators, they're Sales and Marketing. They're the people that bring in money. You've got a guy there who's tripled their research income. Of course he's worth more than a professor.
I was looking further down the list - I agree that someone who triples a college's research income is a valuable resource, I just question why the head of an IT earns more than a senior academic in a university.
 

Expose the lot of them

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The argument is that if we don't pay them so much they will go abroad. Now where did we here that before?
Just like the yank that the Smurfit School of Business employed, without checking his qualifications. Later transpired the cv was a work of fiction, all came out by accident. Wonder where he ended up and on what salary?
 
B

birthday

Just like the yank that the Smurfit School of Business employed, without checking his qualifications. Later transpired the cv was a work of fiction, all came out by accident. Wonder where he ended up and on what salary?
I sincerely hope that you are not referring to Tim Begley. I thought he was at leastbona fide if not overpaid.
 

Astarmain

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What is really interesting are the jobs these high earners have - almost all are administrators/ presidents - I did not see a professor of mathematics or physics or agriculture listed among them although there are a couple of doctors who were tasked with increasing research. It is another example of the imbalance in our state sector where administrators are more highly valued than those in functional areas.
A lot of those are academics who have moved into management positions. In TCD for example

John Hegarty, Provost is a Professor in Physics
Paddy Prendergast, VP and CAO is a Professor in Engineering (actually retired as VP/CAO a couple of weeks ago to run for Provost)
Michael Marsh, Dean of Arts is a Professor in Politics (now the interim VP/CAO)
 

Mar Tweedy

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Then the likes of Ed Walsh former President of UL calling for cuts in social welfare and minimum wage when he is probably in receipt of an enormous pension. What does he know about existing on a low income?
 

He3

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Then the likes of Ed Walsh former President of UL calling for cuts in social welfare and minimum wage when he is probably in receipt of an enormous pension. What does he know about existing on a low income?
Is that the gaff that was paying salaries to three No. 1 post holders at the same time? Did the public ever get that money back?
 

wombat

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A lot of those are academics who have moved into management positions.
I am sure most of them have moved and its obvious that they now earn substantially more than they did while teaching.
However, I argue that it is a fault in the pay structure where a manager who needs no unique talent can earn more than someone who publishes unique research on a continuous basis.
My remarks are based on the published list which shows a predominance of administrators/managers among the highest paid in the education industry rather than a list of brilliant teachers or researchers.
 

budgie29

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Then the likes of Ed Walsh former President of UL calling for cuts in social welfare and minimum wage when he is probably in receipt of an enormous pension. What does he know about existing on a low income?

Yes and its well known UL is the worst run of the universities. Id love to see him survive on eur200 a week for a few months and see if he still has the same opinion.
 


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