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The death of Robert Black: a confession from the soul


eskrimador

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2009
Messages
11,991
I'm a 48 year old man who kept their nose out of the troubles but Mr Black's death, as with others in recent years, has made it abundantly clear that the troubles did not keep its nose out of me.

I tried to find the outrage in me regarding the attacks on Mssrs Black, Heffron, Kerr etc. and it's not there. I feel an anger at those who will not deliver a better life to the upcoming generation but deaths, like hovering helicopters, security alerts and riots are not what they should be to me.

Speaking to friends and family of the same age, I am met with a mundane tone akin to mine with conversations about Jimmy Savile or the BBC raising more interested debate. It's wrong, and I know it's wrong but I don't feel callous, though I probably should but I do most certainly feel desensitised by so many circumstances that have dominated do much of my existence.

I hate feeling this way but I must be honest and maybe it's a little insight for younger ones on here.
 

RedCloud

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
2,998
I'm a 48 year old man who kept their nose out of the troubles but Mr Black's death, as with others in recent years, has made it abundantly clear that the troubles did not keep its nose out of me.

I tried to find the outrage in me regarding the attacks on Mssrs Black, Heffron, Kerr etc. and it's not there. I feel an anger at those who will not deliver a better life to the upcoming generation but deaths, like hovering helicopters, security alerts and riots are not what they should be to me.

Speaking to friends and family of the same age, I am met with a mundane tone akin to mine with conversations about Jimmy Savile or the BBC raising more interested debate. It's wrong, and I know it's wrong but I don't feel callous, though I probably should but I do most certainly feel desensitised by so many circumstances that have dominated do much of my existence.

I hate feeling this way but I must be honest and maybe it's a little insight for younger ones on here.
You're a 48 yr old Walter Mitty cartoon character,with more made up stories than Hans Christian Anderson.
You Troll about the Internet,from dawn to dusk,hoping upon hope to find a wee story that might moisten your panties.
Something with the headline Unionist/loyalist/Israeli just makes your juices flow.
There may be a fair few on here who have fallen for your sanctimonious drivel,fairy tales and down right lies. More fool them.

By the way,you fecking idiot,if you want change,stop voting sf/ira/nazi party !! :)
 

caulfield

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Messages
1,450
I'm a 48 year old man who kept their nose out of the troubles but Mr Black's death, as with others in recent years, has made it abundantly clear that the troubles did not keep its nose out of me.

I tried to find the outrage in me regarding the attacks on Mssrs Black, Heffron, Kerr etc. and it's not there. I feel an anger at those who will not deliver a better life to the upcoming generation but deaths, like hovering helicopters, security alerts and riots are not what they should be to me.

Speaking to friends and family of the same age, I am met with a mundane tone akin to mine with conversations about Jimmy Savile or the BBC raising more interested debate. It's wrong, and I know it's wrong but I don't feel callous, though I probably should but I do most certainly feel desensitised by so many circumstances that have dominated do much of my existence.

I hate feeling this way but I must be honest and maybe it's a little insight for younger ones on here.

It's hardly surprising though is it? NI during the Troubles was a world far removed from normal. In retrospect, there was danger around every corner and death and destruction was so commonplace as to barely make the news.

When something like Mr Black's death occurs then after the initial shock dies down, my own feeling is - please don't start this all over again. Not only for the North of Ireland but also I don't want to be reminded of all that happened.
 

vinoboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 29, 2010
Messages
10,954
If I am being objective , there are many in NI do not give a stuff about this latest death or indeed most of the other deaths .They tuned out , did not get involved in politics and the Troubles were a parallel universe. For those of us interested ,at times it was hard to keep up with the sheer multitude of incidents and from our tribal perspective were merely doing a dead headcount and looking forward to the next round of retaliation ,everybody got either "hardened" or disinterested.
 

Billy the Prod

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 2, 2012
Messages
591
You're a 48 yr old Walter Mitty cartoon character,with more made up stories than Hans Christian Anderson.
You Troll about the Internet,from dawn to dusk,hoping upon hope to find a wee story that might moisten your panties.
Something with the headline Unionist/loyalist/Israeli just makes your juices flow.
There may be a fair few on here who have fallen for your sanctimonious drivel,fairy tales and down right lies. More fool them.

By the way,you fecking idiot,if you want change,stop voting sf/ira/nazi party !! :)
Why did you not use your DT123 profile to issue this denunciation?

It may have been to your credit.
 

eskrimador

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2009
Messages
11,991
If I am being objective , there are many in NI do not give a stuff about this latest death or indeed most of the other deaths .They tuned out , did not get involved in politics and the Troubles were a parallel universe. For those of us interested ,at times it was hard to keep up with the sheer multitude of incidents and from our tribal perspective were merely doing a dead headcount and looking forward to the next round of retaliation ,everybody got either "hardened" or disinterested.
But that's horrible. That said, sod all has been done for the victims who have screams in their heads, never mind those who have the tinnitus of abnormality made normal
 

vaudeville

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
3,780
But that's horrible. That said, sod all has been done for the victims who have screams in their heads, never mind those who have the tinnitus of abnormality made normal
Not true Esk, they're about to be hit with severe cuts, acquiesced :D by their elected representatives.

Go figure.
 

vinoboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 29, 2010
Messages
10,954
But that's horrible. That said, sod all has been done for the victims who have screams in their heads, never mind those who have the tinnitus of abnormality made normal
Self medication, suicide or other coping skills are used .Suppose our ancestors in the 20's and 30's would say stop moaning we have WW2 to fight !
 

eskrimador

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2009
Messages
11,991
Self medication, suicide or other coping skills are used .Suppose our ancestors in the 20's and 30's would say stop moaning we have WW2 to fight !
But the party must go on. The peace industry will line their pockets and victims will be used when opportune.
 

former wesleyan

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
25,809
I'm a 48 year old man who kept their nose out of the troubles but Mr Black's death, as with others in recent years, has made it abundantly clear that the troubles did not keep its nose out of me.

I tried to find the outrage in me regarding the attacks on Mssrs Black, Heffron, Kerr etc. and it's not there. I feel an anger at those who will not deliver a better life to the upcoming generation but deaths, like hovering helicopters, security alerts and riots are not what they should be to me.

Speaking to friends and family of the same age, I am met with a mundane tone akin to mine with conversations about Jimmy Savile or the BBC raising more interested debate. It's wrong, and I know it's wrong but I don't feel callous, though I probably should but I do most certainly feel desensitised by so many circumstances that have dominated do much of my existence.

I hate feeling this way but I must be honest and maybe it's a little insight for younger ones on here.
I'm more or less the same and always was from the beginning...and I'm that bit older which means I remember all of it well. If people get blown up at a war memorial..well, that's just what the IRA do. If the army shoots rioters, well that's just what they do. If Loyalists grab a Catholic coming home from the pub and cut his throat, well that's just what they do. The only death that I remember causing me any kind of pause for regret was that of young Thomas Devlin. Maybe I was projecting all the other unneccessary deaths onto him; I don't know.
 

caulfield

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Messages
1,450
I'm more or less the same and always was from the beginning...and I'm that bit older which means I remember all of it well. If people get blown up at a war memorial..well, that's just what the IRA do. If the army shoots rioters, well that's just what they do. If Loyalists grab a Catholic coming home from the pub and cut his throat, well that's just what they do. The only death that I remember causing me any kind of pause for regret was that of young Thomas Devlin. Maybe I was projecting all the other unneccessary deaths onto him; I don't know.
Obviously everybody's experiences are different. I think we remember the crimes against our own community much more clearly. The first thing that really hit home to me as a child was kingsmills. I can still hear the BBC report from the time and I was only about 8.
Those things stay with you.
As Esk put it - like tinnitus. Always in the background

Good thread so far. Could I ask those who want to argue about sock puppets etc to use one of the many other "sock puppet friendly" threads and don't derail this one
 

factual

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
I'm a 48 year old man who kept their nose out of the troubles but Mr Black's death, as with others in recent years, has made it abundantly clear that the troubles did not keep its nose out of me.

I tried to find the outrage in me regarding the attacks on Mssrs Black, Heffron, Kerr etc. and it's not there. I feel an anger at those who will not deliver a better life to the upcoming generation but deaths, like hovering helicopters, security alerts and riots are not what they should be to me.

Speaking to friends and family of the same age, I am met with a mundane tone akin to mine with conversations about Jimmy Savile or the BBC raising more interested debate. It's wrong, and I know it's wrong but I don't feel callous, though I probably should but I do most certainly feel desensitised by so many circumstances that have dominated do much of my existence.

I hate feeling this way but I must be honest and maybe it's a little insight for younger ones on here.
Is this because they work for the police etc?
 

eskrimador

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Joined
Sep 17, 2009
Messages
11,991

factual

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
No. Because they are the most notable cases.
I am just trying to understand your post. Do you not feel any sorrow for the bereaved because they are government employees? Would you feel any sorrow if say a Catholic had been bereaved by a loyalist gun man? Or is your lack of sorrow applied to all who get killed up north regardless of which side?
 

vaudeville

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
3,780
I'm more or less the same and always was from the beginning...and I'm that bit older which means I remember all of it well. If people get blown up at a war memorial..well, that's just what the IRA do. If the army shoots rioters, well that's just what they do. If Loyalists grab a Catholic coming home from the pub and cut his throat, well that's just what they do. The only death that I remember causing me any kind of pause for regret was that of young Thomas Devlin. Maybe I was projecting all the other unneccessary deaths onto him; I don't know.
Why do you think Thomas Devlin?
 

vaudeville

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
3,780
Obviously everybody's experiences are different. I think we remember the crimes against our own community much more clearly. The first thing that really hit home to me as a child was kingsmills. I can still hear the BBC report from the time and I was only about 8.
Those things stay with you.
As Esk put it - like tinnitus. Always in the background

Good thread so far. Could I ask those who want to argue about sock puppets etc to use one of the many other "sock puppet friendly" threads and don't derail this one
I remember the Devenish shooting, was near to the door and my brother pulled up, had to go to Cookstown and leave my Niece off, I went with him, would have went in to play snooker with Aidan Wallace and his brother.
 

factual

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Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
Esk Do you feel more strongly when you perceive the victim to be your own side of the six county fence?
 

InsideImDancing

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Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
21,961
I am just trying to understand your post. Do you not feel any sorrow for the bereaved because they are government employees? Would you feel any sorrow if say a Catholic had been bereaved by a loyalist gun man? Or is your lack of sorrow applied to all who get killed up north regardless of which side?
I think what Esk is getting at is the fact that after years of incidents in NI, he is numbed to it, used to it, can't feel outrage because he's immune to it.

Fair Esk?
 

davidcameron

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
8,762
I'm a 48 year old man who kept their nose out of the troubles but Mr Black's death, as with others in recent years, has made it abundantly clear that the troubles did not keep its nose out of me.
In the title of the OP said that his name was Robert Black. His name was David Black.
 
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