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The Deportation of James Larkin from the USA


Cruimh

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Must admit, I don't know a lot about Larkin - and would appreciate any recommendations in respect of biography or his role in our history. But saw this earlier and thought it merited a thread :

Historic files from Irish Free State on James Larkin’s deportation from US released

Governor Smith set Larkin free, stating that there was 'no evidence’ that Larkin ever endeavoured to incite any specific set of violence or lawlessness. 'The State of New York does not ask vengeance and the ends of justice have already been amply met,' Smith wrote. 'For those reasons I grant the application.'


With these words Larkin became the recipient of the first unconditional pardon from Sing Sing that had been granted in five years.
Considerably more detail in their linked article

1923 docs reveal Britain’s fears over James Larkin’s return to Ireland

and the Journal also has

My favourite speech: Fergus Finlay · TheJournal.ie

It was a tough time to be a socialist on either side of the Atlantic!
 

Boy M5

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Yet again Cruimh shines a light on something interesting in Irish history that has lain outside the general discourse. Fair play to him.
 

darkhorse

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Larkin was so far to the left, he was even expelled from the Socialist Party of America
We should have never have let him back
 

neveragain

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Larkin was so far to the left, he was even expelled from the Socialist Party of America
We should have never have let him back
We?
Fighting for the rights of workers in Ireland (all of it) at a time when the ordinary worker was treated like a piece of s##it was a dangerous game and Larkin played that game to the best of his ability.
 

Catalpast

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James Larkin died in his sleep on 30 January 1947. His funeral mass was celebrated by the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, John Charles McQuaid, and thousands lined the streets of the city as the hearse passed through on the way to Glasnevin Cemetery.
James Larkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


:shock:

:shock2:

:p
 

GabhaDubh

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My understanding is that both Larkin and Mellow's may have been in the "Tombs" a prison in New York together.
 

Seanie Lemass

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James Larkin died in his sleep on 30 January 1947. His funeral mass was celebrated by the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, John Charles McQuaid, and thousands lined the streets of the city as the hearse passed through on the way to Glasnevin Cemetery.
James Larkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


:shock:

:shock2:

:p

Larkin was fairly devout. He also had pretty much contempt for the Irish Communists, who included his own son. He was far too cute I'd say to have been taken in by the monstrosity that was Stalinism and he would have been fairly familiar with it having been a regular visitor and delegate to Comintern up to the late 1920s. And would have known some of the prominent victims of the purges. Jim Junior had also copped on by the mid 40s leaving the falme to be carried by various oddballs who had little or no actual connection to the Irish working class.
 

darkhorse

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We?
Fighting for the rights of workers in Ireland (all of it) at a time when the ordinary worker was treated like a piece of s##it was a dangerous game and Larkin played that game to the best of his ability.
Larkin was a troublemaker from start to finish ...
He tried to organise a strike among Guinness workers in Dublin - who were among the best paid workers in the country
Due to his reputation, he manipulated the owners of Dublin Trams to block members of his looney ITGWU union from working in their company. And as a result he suceeded in arranging the Dublin Lockout - one of the most severe strikes in Irish history - all of which was centred around membership of his union.
After the Lockout, he went back to America and managed to cause chaos in all kinds of labour related areas due to his support of the Soviet Union. Ultimately he was convicted and jailed for anarchy in the USA - after which he was deported back to Ireland.
Subsequently he tried to rejoin the ITGWU but got nowhere due to differences with the other members
 

Seanie Lemass

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The Lockout was a fkn lockout NOT a strike. The bosses locked out thousands of people for refusing to sign a pledge not to join the ITGWU. This was when people who worked 60/70 hours a week lived in squalor. Whatever else you might say about him, Larkin was on the right side of that. Gombeen scum would have us back there given half a chance.
 

Catalpast

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Larkin was a troublemaker from start to finish ...
He tried to organise a strike among Guinness workers in Dublin - who were among the best paid workers in the country
Due to his reputation, he manipulated the owners of Dublin Trams to block members of his looney ITGWU union from working in their company. And as a result he suceeded in arranging the Dublin Lockout - one of the most severe strikes in Irish history - all of which was centred around membership of his union.
After the Lockout, he went back to America and managed to cause chaos in all kinds of labour related areas due to his support of the Soviet Union. Ultimately he was convicted and jailed for anarchy in the USA - after which he was deported back to Ireland.
Subsequently he tried to rejoin the ITGWU but got nowhere due to differences with the other members
Yes he was certainly a man who could raise a Storm

- but who ended up getting pi**ed on?:cry:
 

Seanie Lemass

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Larkin was so far to the left, he was even expelled from the Socialist Party of America
We should have never have let him back

What are you - 125 years old? The reincarnation of Willie "hide under the bed" Cosgrave?
 

Catalpast

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The Lockout was a fkn lockout NOT a strike. The bosses locked out thousands of people for refusing to sign a pledge not to join the ITGWU. This was when people who worked 60/70 hours a week lived in squalor. Whatever else you might say about him, Larkin was on the right side of that. Gombeen scum would have us back there given half a chance.
Yes that is true enough

- but did Larkin himself personally end up out of pocket?
 

runwiththewind

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Book:- James Larkin (Radical Irish Lives) 2003 by Emmet O'Connor. University of Ulster. Good solid read.
 

james5001

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Larkin was so far to the left, he was even expelled from the Socialist Party of America
We should have never have let him back
So because he was socialist, he should be banned from entering the country?
J C Mc Q would've loved you.
 

james5001

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Larkin was a troublemaker from start to finish ...
He tried to organise a strike among Guinness workers in Dublin - who were among the best paid workers in the country
Due to his reputation, he manipulated the owners of Dublin Trams to block members of his looney ITGWU union from working in their company. And as a result he suceeded in arranging the Dublin Lockout - one of the most severe strikes in Irish history - all of which was centred around membership of his union.
After the Lockout, he went back to America and managed to cause chaos in all kinds of labour related areas due to his support of the Soviet Union. Ultimately he was convicted and jailed for anarchy in the USA - after which he was deported back to Ireland.
Subsequently he tried to rejoin the ITGWU but got nowhere due to differences with the other members
1st bold point-Link?
2nd bold point- Wow. I'd like to see a link to back up that bizarre claim.
Also, it wasn't his union.

Only you could paint a picture that the events of the Dublin Lockout were, overall, a bad thing for the workers to do.
Your post mightn't be criticised much in the indo, but the same standards don't apply here.
 

james5001

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Exactly - the workers
Again, you somehow seem to try and find the negative side of what he did. He was trying to help workers.
 

darkhorse

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So because he was socialist, he should be banned from entering the country?
J C Mc Q would've loved you.
Larkin was convicted for criminal activity and sentenced to 5 to 10 years in jail in the US - after which he was deported back to Ireland
Rightfully, he should have been extradited and served those years in an Irish prison as was his due
 
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