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devnull

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Dec 8, 2009
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1,833
What is an acceptable time period to become fluent in the local language of the nation you move to? Is 2 years the longest it should take if your not an eejit?
It's not really a question of time or intelligence; the key factors are how similar it is to a language you already know and how much effort you choose to put into learning it while living there.

For instance, it's extremely difficult for Westerners to build up a large vocabulary of written Japanese (Kanji).

I'm not an expert, but Romanian (the language you're thinking of, I believe) should be one of the easiest Eastern European languages for a native English speaker to learn because it's a descendant of Latin.
It's similar to Italian/Spanish/French but a bit harder.
 

Bridget558

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Aug 6, 2010
Messages
296
47% flat tax is too high,there has to be a lot of govt corruption there,or inefficiency in running things.
I Dont know much about the local politics of the faroes but i would say they have no choice but to have high taxes, its a very isolated place outside the eu and very expensive to get in and out of by air.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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Website
greatdearleader.blogspot.com
There were already 18,000 emigrating even during the Celtic Tiger so I don't really buy the argument that many Irish people are being "forced" to emigrate any more than the French or Germans were in their recessions. Even if you can't find a job there is one of the most generous social-welfare systems in Europe to fall back on. I think the media are pressuring Irish people to emigrate to protect their precious 'multicultural Ireland'.
 

TaxHavenSite

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Joined
Oct 17, 2010
Messages
388
It's not really a question of time or intelligence; the key factors are how similar it is to a language you already know and how much effort you choose to put into learning it while living there.

For instance, it's extremely difficult for Westerners to build up a large vocabulary of written Japanese (Kanji).

I'm not an expert, but Romanian (the language you're thinking of, I believe) should be one of the easiest Eastern European languages for a native English speaker to learn because it's a descendant of Latin.
It's similar to Italian/Spanish/French but a bit harder.
Romanian is much harder,because it is harder to get media in Romanian compared to Italian/Spanish or french. I only have about 125GB of media in romana(Romanian) and its taking about 3 months to get it. I could have easily gotten 5,000Gb of media in anyone of the other ones by now. It does help that Romania has very fast upload speeds.:lol:

I believe that language learning has 3 parts.
One getting used to hearing the language,Two learn to speak basic and write basic,Three perfect your accent and grammar.
 

Bridget558

Active member
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Messages
296
There were already 18,000 emigrating even during the Celtic Tiger so I don't really buy the argument that many Irish people are being "forced" to emigrate any more than the French or Germans were in their recessions. Even if you can't find a job there is one of the most generous social-welfare systems in Europe to fall back on. I think the media are pressuring Irish people to emigrate to protect their precious 'multicultural Ireland'.
I agree. also its great these days that its so easy to keep in touch with family and friends at home with skype, cheap international phone calls, texting, facebook,twitter email, not like the bad days in the 80s when it cost £2 per min to call france with telecom eireann.
 

Johnny64

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Oct 25, 2010
Messages
22

Goodbody

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Sep 21, 2010
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Just imagine if the Cowen's, Lenihan's, Coughlan's, O'Dea's etc had emigrated. What a better country this would be. Can we banish them all, or is that only allowed in fairy tales?
 

TaxHavenSite

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Oct 17, 2010
Messages
388
I'm currently making plans to head over to the states, luckily i'm a US citizen.

Here are some links that some people might find useful;
Crosscare Migrant Project: Innovation and Action for Social Justice
Welcome to the Irish Apostolate USA
The Coalition for Irish Immigration Centers
Need Advice? | globalirish.ie – about Irish emigration and the diaspora

Has anyone know of any Irish friendly firms in the US? I'd like to get something sorted before heading over.
But your American as well?Why you need so much migration help?
 

Tigris Celtica

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Aug 26, 2009
Messages
503
For anyone taking the leap be careful. If things don't work out and you have to return to Ireland you could end up desitute. Over 3,000 returning Irish refused dole - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie
Chances are that if you remain here in Ireland you'll end up destitute as well - Do you really believe that the current levels of social welfare will last much longer ? ? If you do then the December budget should give you a sharp reminder of the way things are heading.
 

What the Fug

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Aug 26, 2009
Messages
391
Just imagine if the Cowen's, Lenihan's, Coughlan's, O'Dea's etc had emigrated. What a better country this would be. Can we banish them all, or is that only allowed in fairy tales?

But daddy was high up in FF so their was always money and a job for them, so never any need
 

Johnny64

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Oct 25, 2010
Messages
22
But your American as well?Why you need so much migration help?
I don't see what you're getting at here. I'm emigrating from Ireland, i'm still going through the same rigmarole of moving to another country, getting a job etc. I just happen to not have to get a visa.
 

TaxHavenSite

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Oct 17, 2010
Messages
388
I don't see what you're getting at here. I'm emigrating from Ireland, i'm still going through the same rigmarole of moving to another country, getting a job etc. I just happen to not have to get a visa.
Try submitting your resume to companies by going to their website,there should be a link that says careers on most companies website.
 

Johnny64

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Oct 25, 2010
Messages
22
Try submitting your resume to companies by going to their website,there should be a link that says careers on most companies website.
I've been doing exactly that for a while now, a lot of firms, unless you're a red hot candidate, are reluctant to hire from abroad when they can usually find people already set up locally.
Hence i'm moving to the states, most likely DC or New York.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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greatdearleader.blogspot.com
For anyone taking the leap be careful. If things don't work out and you have to return to Ireland you could end up desitute. Over 3,000 returning Irish refused dole - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie
Another example of the nonsense the EU is forcing on us. We should have a right to protect Irish citizens because Irish citizens elected this govt and Oireachtas. We must push for legislative of Treaty changes at EU level to allow equality of access to social-welfare for returning Irish emigrants with Irish nationals resident here. Tell Brussels to shove it.
 

THR

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Nov 15, 2006
Messages
1,010
Some people are making this issue more dramatic than need be. If you are young and single, there is no reason why you shouldn't try your luck overseas. If nothing else, it would be a valuable experience. If things go right you can stay abroad for good, if the grass isn't greener on the other side you can always come back home.

It is a completely different situation for people who have a family. Then you should think long and hard whether to make such a decision as to leave your birth-country behind. If you have small children, they will grow up to regard the new country as their primary home-country as they grow.

In either case, it is very advisable not to leave your country by slamming doors behind you. You may regret it later if you end up in a situation where you must come back.
 

Tigris Celtica

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Messages
503
Some people are making this issue more dramatic than need be. If you are young and single, there is no reason why you shouldn't try your luck overseas. If nothing else, it would be a valuable experience. If things go right you can stay abroad for good, if the grass isn't greener on the other side you can always come back home.

It is a completely different situation for people who have a family. Then you should think long and hard whether to make such a decision as to leave your birth-country behind. If you have small children, they will grow up to regard the new country as their primary home-country as they grow.
In my opinion having young children is all the more reason to leave. They have no future in this country in the short to medium term, and no future in the long term unless the cancer in Irish society that is Zanu FF is cut out and destroyed - only then have we any hope of even starting to rebuild this country. Unfortunately it may even be too late to do that.

In either case, it is very advisable not to leave your country by slamming doors behind you. You may regret it later if you end up in a situation where you must come back.
What exactly is that meant to mean ? People being forced to leave this country have every reason and every right to slam the door very loudly behind them.
 

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