The End of Car phones - Hands-free or not.

Half Nelson

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"The jury rejected your account and accepted that you were distracted by using your hands free phone."
Woman who caused Lincoln biker’s death while chatting on hands-free phone jailed.

In the UK, if you're in an accident while chatting on a hands-free phone, you could be facing a prison sentence by virtue of being distracted.

This raises serious issues for individuals and, more especially, for employers, who may rely on hands-free to conduct business.
An employer who provides a hands-free, or requests that an employee use one, may find himself in the dock alongside his employee.

Lord Ross' antennae just twitched.
 


Victor Meldrew

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Woman who caused Lincoln biker’s death while chatting on hands-free phone jailed.

In the UK, if you're in an accident while chatting on a hands-free phone, you could be facing a prison sentence by virtue of being distracted.

This raises serious issues for individuals and, more especially, for employers, who may rely on hands-free to conduct business.
An employer who provides a hands-free or requests that an employee uses one may find himself in the dock alongside his employee.

Lord Ross' antennae just twitched.
Your passengers know when to shut up to let you focus on the road. I find that there is a difference when I am chatting to herself via the phone, and can (through pauses in conversation, "hang on a sec, I am taking a turn", or "there is a muppet here"), infer that I am distracted, so pause, but if it is a client / colleague, not so much.

Thing is, transporting children is worse. God, it can be awful. I think we need to market "people and children" carriers. With a Limo soundproofed divider for the back seats.
 

Congalltee

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Smoking, drinking coffee, on the phone: cause a fatal crash and you’re going to the joy. (Unless the smoker and the coffee drinker hid the evidence).
 

Half Nelson

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Half Nelson

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Smoking, drinking coffee, on the phone: cause a fatal crash and you’re going to the joy. (Unless the smoker and the coffee drinker hid the evidence).
If employers provide a hands-free they have a duty of care to ensure it is never used. :|
 

Orbit v2

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Your passengers know when to shut up to let you focus on the road. I find that there is a difference when I am chatting to herself via the phone, and can (through pauses in conversation, "hang on a sec, I am taking a turn", or "there is a muppet here"), infer that I am distracted, so pause, but if it is a client / colleague, not so much.

Thing is, transporting children is worse. God, it can be awful. I think we need to market "people and children" carriers. With a Limo soundproofed divider for the back seats.
I don't think anyone is going to be locked up just for chatting on a hands-free phone.
Samantha Ayres, 34, had been on a phone call for over 25 minutes and was completely on the wrong side of the road when she smashed in to devoted dad David Kirk, 26
She was jailed because she was on the wrong side of the road. Maybe she was distracted, but that doesn't mean everyone would be distracted to that extent. But, I'd agree, a conversation with a customer/client might well be distracting.
 

Half Nelson

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I don't think anyone is going to be locked up just for chatting on a hands-free phone.

She was jailed because she was on the wrong side of the road. Maybe she was distracted, but that doesn't mean everyone would be distracted to that extent. But, I'd agree, a conversation with a customer/client might well be distracting.
Here's a scenario -
A company car driver has a minor accident and is charged with careless or dangerous driving because he was on the phone. He's banned and loses his job.
He then sues for wrongful dismissal and damages because his employer provided the phone and implicitly made using it a condition of employment.
What do you think are his chances of success?

The same or similar reasoning would apply to charging the employer as an accomplice in the offence.
 

Orbit v2

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Here's a scenario -
A company car driver has a minor accident and is charged with careless or dangerous driving because he was on the phone. He's banned and loses his job.
He then sues for wrongful dismissal and damages because his employer provided the phone and implicitly made using it a condition of employment.
What do you think are his chances of success?

The same or similar reasoning would apply to charging the employer as an accomplice in the offence.
It's common sense. The post I replied to showed common sense. You're positing a whole sequence of tenuous connections. If someone has a minor accident then they're not likely to be charged with anything, even if they were on the phone. If the accident was more serious then it meant he was doing something stupid, like the woman mentioned above. Hands-free phones reduce risk dramatically compared to using a phone in your hand.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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Au contraire - with the advent of driverless cars, we'll all be on them and more
 

JimmyFoley

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An inconvenient truth.

Leave the phone in your pocket or handbag for the duration of the journey, unless your car breaks down or you become completely lost or whatever.
 

wexfordman

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Self driving vehicles is the way to go
 

Clanrickard

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Woman who caused Lincoln biker’s death while chatting on hands-free phone jailed.

In the UK, if you're in an accident while chatting on a hands-free phone, you could be facing a prison sentence by virtue of being distracted.

This raises serious issues for individuals and, more especially, for employers, who may rely on hands-free to conduct business.
An employer who provides a hands-free, or requests that an employee use one, may find himself in the dock alongside his employee.

Lord Ross' antennae just twitched.
Good. No need for phones in cars at all.
 

*EPIC SUCCESS*

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I hate speaking on the phone with a severe passion and would like to see this extended to walking, sitting, standing, lying down, having a fit or having a conniption whether living, dead or in a mangled state but still barely hanging in there.
 

*EPIC SUCCESS*

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I think the problem of drivers using their mobiles while driving is worse now than it ever has been. I see it every single day where I live, often multiple times a day. The problem is that nobody thinks the law applies to them and since it's rarely enforced the threat is impotent.
It's liable to cause a fatal accident and everyone will be so, so sorry etc etc when it does.

I say death caused by being distracted by using a mobile should have a minimum of 5 (or even 7) years in prison.

Death is death, you get out of prison.
 

reg11

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It's liable to cause a fatal accident and everyone will be so, so sorry etc etc when it does.

I say death caused by being distracted by using a mobile should have a minimum of 5 (or even 7) years in prison.

Death is death, you get out of prison.
It was mentioned on the radio that one of the drivers in the dreadful accident in Wexford that killed 4, had a mobile phone addiction.

I see it happening everyday. I saw an artic driver with a phone to his ear driving like a lunatic a while back. It's dreadfully stupid that this continues considering people are led to believe that if they get a whiff of cigarette smoke they're seriously in danger, yet whilst on the road they run the real risk of being crushed like an insect.
 

Niall996

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But of course it's perfectly alright to put up loads of advertising billboards along roadways whose absolute and sole intent is to distract drivers.
 

reg11

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But of course it's perfectly alright to put up loads of advertising billboards along roadways whose absolute and sole intent is to distract drivers.
They don't have remotely near the same level of distraction though.
 

JimmyFoley

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It was mentioned on the radio that one of the drivers in the dreadful accident in Wexford that killed 4, had a mobile phone addiction.

I see it happening everyday. I saw an artic driver with a phone to his ear driving like a lunatic a while back. It's dreadfully stupid that this continues considering people are led to believe that if they get a whiff of cigarette smoke they're seriously in danger, yet whilst on the road they run the real risk of being crushed like an insect.
Anything that is an inconvenience to drivers is fiercely resisted by many of them; reason doesn't come into it.

Another good example of this is the outrage expressed by those who are breath-tested the 'morning after'.
 


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