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The Factors Which Affect Our Levels of Suicide.


Radix

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Aug 31, 2010
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Back in the 90's I joined the Irish Association of Suicidology because of my concerns and personal experiences of people ending their lives at their own hands. Fast forward almost a couple of decades, and I find that more and more people now decide that they just don't want to live anymore, and leave behind them untold sadness and unanswered questions for bewildered loved ones.

These real people come from all walks of life, and from all age groups. But what makes me especially sad, is to see those statistics which show an ever increasing number of 'younger' people choosing to end their lives.

The question I keep asking myself is, are we quite literally 'missing something'?

Thoughts please, fellow members of the Politics.ie community?
 

pragmaticapproach

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Jul 21, 2010
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8,817
Back in the 90's I joined the Irish Association of Suicidology because of my concerns and personal experiences of people ending their lives at their own hands. Fast forward almost a couple of decades, and I find that more and more people now decide that they just don't want to live anymore, and leave behind them untold sadness and unanswered questions for bewildered loved ones.

These real people come from all walks of life, and from all age groups. But what makes me especially sad, is to see those statistics which show an ever increasing number of 'younger' people choosing to end their lives.

The question I keep asking myself is, are we quite literally 'missing something'?

Thoughts please, fellow members of the Politics.ie community?
In addition to the current situation with the economy I suspect those constantly harping on about suicide are partially to blame.

Let

The way we approach traumatic events like bullying, sexual abuse, and exposure to war is influenced by what we are shown and the social norms that we adopt that guide our behavior. Have you ever wondered why there were so many drive-by shootings a few years ago, and now almost none? Or why before Columbine made school shootings famous, they were practically unheard of? At what point are we, and our insatiable appetite for these macabre events, creating the recipe book for destructive self-expression? When we stop reporting these events, their incidence may decrease.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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Dec 4, 2010
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all countries with a long-dark-winter and a drink problem have high suicide levels. Men are 4 times as likely as women to take their own life. Perhaps its our reluctance to fight back and defend ourselves. If some people make you miserable to the point of ending your own life then do you really want to point the gun at yourself ?

the greeks, french, spanish riot and fight. Even the Brits are far more robust in standing up for themselves. The irish seem to turn the violence in on themselves, this was also well documented during the potato famine. Commentators were amazed how readily the irish peasantry willed themselves to martyrdom.
 
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pragmaticapproach

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Jul 21, 2010
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8,817
all countries with a long-dark-winter and a drink problem have high suicide levels. Men are 4 times as likely as women to take their own life.
I brought up the issue of vitamin B12 on the cancer thread, and how its essential to consume adequate amounts of B12 especially when there is a lack of sunlight. B12 also contributes towards healthy brain functioning so it may help with depression in addition to preventing cancers.

Vitamin B-12 and depression: Are they related? - MayoClinic.com
 

cyberianpan

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Much of suicide and what surrounds it is taboo in Ireland - and I'm not sure that is helpful


cYp
 

Davidoff

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Oct 4, 2010
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In addition to the current situation with the economy I suspect those constantly harping on about suicide are partially to blame.

Let
The word 'blame' might be a little strong, but I do worry that the current saturation coverage in the media of youth suicide might somehow elevate the act as an option in the mind of a vulnerable person.

Death might seem almost cool, or as a way to be achieve a level of post-mortem significance denied to the living. Or it might be considered the ultimate passive-aggressive way to strike back at one's tormentors.

The media certainly needs to think about the way it's covering the subject.
 

redhead

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Joined
Jun 11, 2007
Messages
6,900
Back in the 90's I joined the Irish Association of Suicidology because of my concerns and personal experiences of people ending their lives at their own hands. Fast forward almost a couple of decades, and I find that more and more people now decide that they just don't want to live anymore, and leave behind them untold sadness and unanswered questions for bewildered loved ones.

These real people come from all walks of life, and from all age groups. But what makes me especially sad, is to see those statistics which show an ever increasing number of 'younger' people choosing to end their lives.

The question I keep asking myself is, are we quite literally 'missing something'?

Thoughts please, fellow members of the Politics.ie community?
No studies have been published examining the proportional increases in suicide rates and prescription rates for antidepressants.

These medications have in recent years been both heavily and too casually overprescribed for all sorts of ailments, not just mental health issues, by those with little-to-no understanding of the pharmacology involved and have insufficient warnings on the pack inserts with regards to side effects which can include worsening of mood in those who are depressed and suicidal ideation in those who are not clinically depressed or suicidal to begin with.
 

Radix

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Aug 31, 2010
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10,031
In addition to the current situation with the economy I suspect those constantly harping on about suicide are partially to blame.
But surely it is the 'burying' of real anthropological truth which has created the conditions for falsehood to attain a power not its own. I am very much in favour of the NUJ policy on suicide whereby we don't create 'copycat' precedences, but whilst this policy has been in force for many years in the industry, we still have an ever increasing level of suicide.

Young people don't read NUJ publications, yet they still continue to kill themselves in ever greater numbers sadly. We need to be asking ourselves why is this, instead of blaming those of us who simply report a sanitised version of the truth as it actually is.

Your unthinking attitude reminds me of the County Councillor who suggested that we should cut down trees, lest people drive into them deliberately; it fails to tackle root causes; (yes I see that....)

Similarly I remember at an IAS symposium I attended, addressed by no less than the then former Commissioner P. Flynn, an invited speaker from Coventry (a 'Professor' of Epedimiology), suggested that Ireland might look at the possibilities of restricting analgesic sales, and also consider building higher barriers on our motorway crossovers lest people might throw themselves from these parapets; a corrupt approach you will admit, and all the more apt, given the company he shared.

Those "harping on about suicide" are not to blame, but rather those who are not "harping on enough" about suicide are to blame, I would argue.

This is something which needs to be talked about, big time.
 

Radix

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I brought up the issue of vitamin B12 on the cancer thread, and how its essential to consume adequate amounts of B12 especially when there is a lack of sunlight. B12 also contributes towards healthy brain functioning so it may help with depression in addition to preventing cancers.
Indeed, but man does not live on Vitamin B12 alone............

I would ask the question about our need to nourish the spiritual side to our nature....

Indeed, do we have such a side which we may starve?
 
R

Ramps

What's quite remarkable about suicide in Ireland today is that it almost seems to be just another 'option' in dealing with a perceived hardship or crisis, e.g. if a girl/boyfriend breaks up with the person in question. How did it become so commonplace and unremarkable for a person to take his life?

You look at what certain people went thru' in history-Jews, Russians, Black Americans- and how they clung on to any single thread they could find, determined to do anything to survive, regardless of the horrors they faced; compare it to what 'triggers' suicide by people today.

It makes me wonder if, in fact, the desire to die by suicide is actually just a mundane part of the make-up of many humans and would it always have been commonplace(throughout history) had it not been frowned upon, particulary by religious groups.
 

Davidoff

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You ask, Radix, are we missing something.

There was an interesting programme last night in which Richard Dawkins explored how atheists find meaning in life.

It was striking that many of the famous atheists who wrestled with the issue (he instanced Tolstoy and Graham Greene, amongst others) ended up suicidal or thereabouts.

Religion, for all its faults, provides a reason to endure a life that might otherwise seem devoid of purpose and not worth living.

Perhaps the rise of suicide is a direct consequence of the emergence of a secular society?
 

Eoin Coir

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Jun 16, 2012
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16,632
What's quite remarkable about suicide in Ireland today is that it almost seems to be just another 'option' in dealing with a perceived hardship or crisis, e.g. if a girl/boyfriend breaks up with the person in question. How did it become so commonplace and unremarkable for a person to take his life?

You look at what certain people went thru' in history-Jews, Russians, Black Americans- and how they clung on to any single thread they could find, determined to do anything to survive, regardless of the horrors they faced; compare it to what 'triggers' suicide by people today.

It makes me wonder if, in fact, the desire to die by suicide is actually just a mundane part of the make-up of many humans and would it always have been commonplace(throughout history) had it not been frowned upon, particulary by religious groups.

That point has been made before.Take poor Irish who had to emigrate and live in tough conditions like those from other lands,they struggled but did not take their own lives.

When no stigma attaches and people see a funeral with full rites of church, favourite football jersey and cd on display young people may think it is a good way to get out ?
 

Hitch 22

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There are shades on the psychological scale.

Some people - a minority - have no guilt, have no fear and do not suffer from anxiety. They are business people, politicians, soldiers, criminals, saints, serial killers, criminals, womanizers, heroes and villains, great sportspeople and great cheats.

The majority of people are mediocre.

Another minority on the other end of the scale - care too much, love too much, hate too much, worry too much etc and some of those people kill themselves.

Some are born to kill and others are born to kill themselves while the rest of us just get on with things.
 

Deep Blue

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Jul 4, 2012
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The word 'blame' might be a little strong, but I do worry that the current saturation coverage in the media of youth suicide might somehow elevate the act as an option in the mind of a vulnerable person.

Death might seem almost cool, or as a way to be achieve a level of post-mortem significance denied to the living. Or it might be considered the ultimate passive-aggressive way to strike back at one's tormentors.

The media certainly needs to think about the way it's covering the subject.
Have no personal experience thank God but I think you might be onto something there.

I always think it desperately sad when youngsters post "tributes", speaking to suicide victims on their Facebook pages
as if they almost expect them to read them later.

They seem to have no real concept of the actual finality of death. Is it because death today has somehow been "sanitised" or airbrushed out of our consciousness? When life was more basic, and yes, poorer and more brutal, death was a part of existence.

Maybe, paradoxically, life was a bit more precious?

I am only musing, but as someone said, these young suicides are a waste and a tragedy, because many of the victims had no idea at all yet about how tough life can really be ........
 

Davidoff

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Oct 4, 2010
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We might also add the ever more pervasive culture of aggressive consumerism.

Poeple are encouraged to think that they are not achieving if they don't have a 4x4 in the drive and a 500 quid smartphone in their pocket.
 

Rural

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Apr 28, 2007
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I must say that the worst is when a parent takes their children's lives then their spouse, then themselves. We had three of them in a row in this County a few years back.
 
R

Ramps

When no stigma attaches and people see a funeral with full rites of church, favourite football jersey and cd on display young people may think it is a good way to get out ?
I'm really not sure about anything to do with suicide, to be honest, but I must say that I find it very unnerving when I look at the reaction of some teenagers to a suicide by one of their peers; it looks almost rehearsed or something, as though they are almost...god, I hate saying this...enjoying the drama or the social aspect of the grieving...the wailing, the exaggerated hugs, the (ubiquitous) Tupac songs, etc. I'm not trying to be judgmental or anything, but there is something about the whole thing that makes me very uneasy.
 
R

Ramps

I always think it desperately sad when youngsters post "tributes", speaking to suicide victims on their Facebook pages
as if they almost expect them to read them later.
Honestly, I'd blame a lot of that kind of thing on 'reality' TV, particularly those ************************************g singing 'competitions', and the whining, egotism, and mock-comradeship that goes with them. Soul destroying to watch the shallowness of it all.
 

pippakin

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Feb 22, 2010
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So many people are committing suicide now its almost an epidemic.

There are so many reasons, perhaps for some young people their school years were the best, the need for work and the lack of it can be a rude awakening. For some adults life must sometimes seem like an endless defeat to the point that it doesn't seem worth it, and for others the never ending bills and worry.

Poverty in the west is different too, once everyone was poor and looked it now it can look like you're the only one.

And I do wonder if there are some young people who maybe think its a trip, so many larger than life people jumping off high rise buildings, and surviving.
 
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