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The famine, time to peel away the myth

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Apr 22, 2006
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2
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
 


Cael

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I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.
 

The Analyser

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115
Cael said:
I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.
:roll: :roll: :roll: Where do you get your knowledge of history from? The cartoon section of An Phoblacht? :lol: :lol:
 

Cael

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The Analyser said:
Cael said:
I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.
:roll: :roll: :roll: Where do you get your knowledge of history from? The cartoon section of An Phoblacht? :lol: :lol:
If I hear of any secondhand brains for sale I will let you know Anal-yser, but you are probably happier, as you are, without one.
 

Samarkand

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red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
... just remind me again when the last time was that the Irish people en masse "went on" about the Famine.? I think that, for whatever it was worth or not, once Blair's govt did a bit of an apology and (some of) the Irish became a bit richer recently, most of the ill feeling has died away.... so why are you whinging tonight?!?
 

Cara

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anmajornarthainig said:
Is this a windup?
"they should think of the positives that famine brought"
Yep, looks like yous have been Pogo-ed...don't worry the effects will wear off.
 

Cael

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Samarkand said:
red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
... just remind me again when the last time was that the Irish people en masse "went on" about the Famine.? I think that, for whatever it was worth or not, once Blair's govt did a bit of an apology and (some of) the Irish became a bit richer recently, most of the ill feeling has died away.... so why are you whinging tonight?!?
Your right, most Irish people today would rather rattle on about property prices and the so called "Celtic Tiger," than remember the slavery and genocide their ancestors faced. In fact, a lot of them would like to pretend that it never happened, and that the English were always our best friends. Such pathetic delusion must be quite rare in the word?
 

st333ve

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Messages
2,101
red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
:lol: Nice try but your obvious attempt to wind up some irish people is pathetic.
Go grab some war drums and dress up like a clown and march through some catholic old age pensioner area.

This post doesnt surprise me, there is absoloutly no limits whatsoever to what unionists will deny.

The only thing that i believe resembles this ludacris denial on the same scale would be this eejits comments :lol: ......


" The Americans have all been defeated Iraq is safe "
 

beardyboy

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It has always been the same - just after the famine the Marchioness of Derry had inscribed on the Cut Rock below Garron Point a rambling drivel - emulated here by her (political) descendants - about how good the English were providing people with work schemes during the famine and so on.

Good taste prevailed during the war in independance and someone chiseled most of it out
 

st333ve

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Fact.
Food production and distribution are economic issues affecting the Famine. Records show Irish lands exported food, even during the worst years. When Ireland experienced a famine in 1782-83

Fact.
Cecil Woodham-Smith, an authority on the Irish Famine, wrote in The Great Hunger; Ireland 1845-1849 that, "...no issue has provoked so much anger or so embittered relations between the two countries (England and Ireland) as the indisputable fact that huge quantities of food were exported from Ireland to England throughout the period when the people of Ireland were dying of starvation."

Fact.
Christine Kinealy, a University of Liverpool fellow and author of two texts on the Irish Famine: This Great Calamity and A Death-Dealing Famine, writes that Irish exports of calves,livestock (except pigs), bacon and ham actually increased during the famine. The food was shipped under guard from the most famine-stricken parts of Ireland

Fact.
The blight spread across Europe, but only in Ireland were its consequences so drastic. Subdivision, small tenant farms, and reliance on a single crop for home consumption [not export], are just a few of many potential reasons why Ireland suffered so much more than the Continent.
The irish were forced to depend on the potato crop as they were denied other produce by the plantation landlords.


There is no myth that britain acted disgustingly towards ireland during these dark days.
At the very minimum the british knowingly let people starve while at the same time taking their produce.
Some would go as far as calling it an extermination, but i think that the only people that believe that this is a myth and that the great british had nothing to do with it, are probobly unique to northern ireland and its many housing estates with 100+ union jacks flying from anything that can bare the weight of a flag.

Tony Blair appolagised on behalf of britain for the past treatment so its official in their eyes also.
 

Respvblica

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212
red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.
Remember that how these "irish landowners" got control of the land in Ireland? A POLITICAL decision was made on that other island, yes Britain, to dispossess the former occupants of their property - so much for private property. There is no point in planting new seed if the weeds are still in the field. That was main current of British thinking in regard to Ireland for centuries.
 

Catalpa

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10,257
The big killer during the years of the Famine was not so much outright starvation but death from 'famine fever' as people succumbed to Typhus and other infections that a healthy body could resist.

Some areas did expereince outright starvation but it was a huge increase in the general level of malnutrition that allowed for diseases to sweep through the population and kill around a million people.

Ethnic Cleansing by Stealth IMO! :x
 

BelfastSpark

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Messages
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red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
There is quite a bit of Anglophobia on this site, some Justified some not. However solely in relation to your post. I have hold my hands up and say 'Its a fair cop' The Irish Landowners, Farmers and Buisnessmen profited hugely from the famine by exploiting conditions. The Gombeen men, would have bought a Labourers spade, pots and pans nets in a pawn,so the labourer could eat, next he sold back to him at an inflated price. You can see some towns in Ireland where 1 family name owns the local hotel. Funeral director pub etc, these are the decendents of the Gombeens.post 1850-60 you can see RC churches built by people who profited in the Famine, Drumintee is a classic example, you should go see the plaque on the wall I wont name names.So the church is implicated in the complacency also.
Sure Murphy an IPP MP caused the Dublin lockout in 1913.
Relief during the Famine was administered by Quakers ,Methodists etc many dying of cholera-desease themeselves. True there wasnt a Famine but Irish landowners refused to feed thier own people, seeing the opportunity to gain land.
The Irish launguage was not taken of us by the British, but by the Irish, it was they who used the Blackthorn stick to beat children who spoke Irish. Irish Catholic teachers!!
Point being a lot of Irish people do not like revisionism with the issue of the famine. They like to believe it was all the English fault, yes economic policy led to it but the Irish were more than eager participants as you say.You could say that a Industry of professional empathisers has built up in Ireland over the famine just like the Holocaust. I will not Excuse the English for their part neither can I for the Irish.
Both were responsible.
 

wexfordman

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Nov 19, 2006
Messages
7,760
red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
I was wondering rwb if you could just clarify one point for me.

The Irish Landowners you refer to above, were mainly actually origionally either of english,scottish or welsh origion, or thier descendents .

Based on your comments above, you classify these landlords as irish, so I am assuming you are saying that pretty much anyone lving on this Island is now irish, and not British ?

Just wondering if you could clarify it, were these landlords irish or british, and based on which ever you think it is, then how does this apply other inhabitants on the island to this day irrespective of thier descendency
Wexfordman
 
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BelfastSpark said:
red white blue and green said:
Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
There is quite a bit of Anglophobia on this site, some Justified some not. However solely in relation to your post. I have hold my hands up and say 'Its a fair cop' The Irish Landowners, Farmers and Buisnessmen profited hugely from the famine by exploiting conditions. The Gombeen men, would have bought a Labourers spade, pots and pans nets in a pawn,so the labourer could eat, next he sold back to him at an inflated price. You can see some towns in Ireland where 1 family name owns the local hotel. Funeral director pub etc, these are the decendents of the Gombeens.post 1850-60 you can see RC churches built by people who profited in the Famine, Drumintee is a classic example, you should go see the plaque on the wall I wont name names.So the church is implicated in the complacency also.
Sure Murphy an IPP MP caused the Dublin lockout in 1913.
Relief during the Famine was administered by Quakers ,Methodists etc many dying of cholera-desease themeselves. True there wasnt a Famine but Irish landowners refused to feed thier own people, seeing the opportunity to gain land.
The Irish launguage was not taken of us by the British, but by the Irish, it was they who used the Blackthorn stick to beat children who spoke Irish. Irish Catholic teachers!!
Point being a lot of Irish people do not like revisionism with the issue of the famine. They like to believe it was all the English fault, yes economic policy led to it but the Irish were more than eager participants as you say.You could say that a Industry of professional empathisers has built up in Ireland over the famine just like the Holocaust. I will not Excuse the English for their part neither can I for the Irish.
Both were responsible.
some good points made above but i think you've missed the point with 'the Irish were more than eager participants'. i dont think you'd agree that those who starved or were forced to work for less than a pittance were in any way eager? in my opinion, the famine hits home how the business class will do almost anything to see their bottom line increase, even if it's at the expense of their own. to highlight these people and their repulsive attitude to money over the well fair of people is only right, they played a vital part in the system laid down by the british government at the time.

as for the catholic churh, they have proved themselves time and again to be nothing more than a leech on our society. before, during and after the famine, big churches were built. grand big churchs and most of the country either being starved or persecuted. i believe that without the church's stranglehold on people here, we would have got rid of the british years ago. either through force of arms or more recently, the south would have looked more appealing to the unionists up north.

but the ultimate cause, which pogo and his band of lunatic revisionists are trying to downplay, is the british using ireland as a pantry while holding her under arms. that the gombeens made hay at this time is to their eternal shame.
 

BelfastSpark

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outside looking in said:
BelfastSpark said:
[quote="red white blue and green":1zjmtwye]Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
There is quite a bit of Anglophobia on this site, some Justified some not. However solely in relation to your post. I have hold my hands up and say 'Its a fair cop' The Irish Landowners, Farmers and Buisnessmen profited hugely from the famine by exploiting conditions. The Gombeen men, would have bought a Labourers spade, pots and pans nets in a pawn,so the labourer could eat, next he sold back to him at an inflated price. You can see some towns in Ireland where 1 family name owns the local hotel. Funeral director pub etc, these are the decendents of the Gombeens.post 1850-60 you can see RC churches built by people who profited in the Famine, Drumintee is a classic example, you should go see the plaque on the wall I wont name names.So the church is implicated in the complacency also.
Sure Murphy an IPP MP caused the Dublin lockout in 1913.
Relief during the Famine was administered by Quakers ,Methodists etc many dying of cholera-desease themeselves. True there wasnt a Famine but Irish landowners refused to feed thier own people, seeing the opportunity to gain land.
The Irish launguage was not taken of us by the British, but by the Irish, it was they who used the Blackthorn stick to beat children who spoke Irish. Irish Catholic teachers!!
Point being a lot of Irish people do not like revisionism with the issue of the famine. They like to believe it was all the English fault, yes economic policy led to it but the Irish were more than eager participants as you say.You could say that a Industry of professional empathisers has built up in Ireland over the famine just like the Holocaust. I will not Excuse the English for their part neither can I for the Irish.
Both were responsible.
some good points made above but i think you've missed the point with 'the Irish were more than eager participants'. i dont think you'd agree that those who starved or were forced to work for less than a pittance were in any way eager? in my opinion, the famine hits home how the business class will do almost anything to see their bottom line increase, even if it's at the expense of their own. to highlight these people and their repulsive attitude to money over the well fair of people is only right, they played a vital part in the system laid down by the british government at the time.

as for the catholic churh, they have proved themselves time and again to be nothing more than a leech on our society. before, during and after the famine, big churches were built. grand big churchs and most of the country either being starved or persecuted. i believe that without the church's stranglehold on people here, we would have got rid of the british years ago. either through force of arms or more recently, the south would have looked more appealing to the unionists up north.

but the ultimate cause, which pogo and his band of lunatic revisionists are trying to downplay, is the british using ireland as a pantry while holding her under arms. that the gombeens made hay at this time is to their eternal shame.[/quote:1zjmtwye]
Yes I would agree, I think this also reiterates the point that no Nation can rule another Nation without the willing participation of at least its native Ruling or Middle Classes.
 

An Ghearb

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The underfed apathy of the dehumanized and voiceless underclass goes a long way to setting a good foundation, though.
 

beardyboy

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Why do the anti-Catholics use every disaster to blame the Church - but then never let the facts get in the way.

The Church in Ireland was not rich but, through its overseas network, it maintained a flow of relief money. This largely unknown Catholic relief work kept thousands alive during the worst periods of the Famine. At first, some priests gave from their own moneys as for instance James Maher, uncle of Paul Cullen, who sold his horse and gig to raise money. [All the Cullens were remarkably generous.] Soon, however, they had to appeal for outside help. The very charitable Daniel Murray, Archbishop of Dublin, played a central role as regards the distribution of relief funds that came to him from all over Europe, and as far away as America, Africa and Australia. Among the earliest recorded gifts he received for relief were two guineas from two English Protestant lawyers in Lichfield. In Kenmare, the enterprising Archdeacon O'Sullivan, at his own risk, imported food which he sold at cost price and then used the money to import again and recommence the process and so managed to distribute cheaply L30,000 worth of food. He told a parliamentary committee: "I felt that it was unusual business for a priest to turn flour merchant, but still someone had to do it all the time."

Convents everywhere provided meals and, in particular, breakfasts for the children. Sister Mary O'Donel of the Presentation Convent in Galway wrote that "We are struggling to keep on our breakfasts as the only means [the children] have and to clothe the destitute orphan." In Galway, too, the Patrician Brothers, under Paul O'Connor, had set up the Orphans' Breakfast and Clothing Institute which at one stage was giving breakfast to a thousand children as well as feeding 400 to 500 poor in their homes. The Annual Report for 1847 reads: "It is resolved that while a penny or particle of food remains in the Establishment, or can be obtained by the humblest entreaty, not one of the little creatures will be cast overboard!" John Leonard, superior of the Christian Brothers in Peacock Lane, in Cork city, told his confreres, "We must feed the children we have before taught, and to do this, let us first begin with ourselves and make some sacrifices for their sakes." Thanks to "the charity of our friends in England," they were able to give one meal a day to four hundred children. The abbot of the Cistercian abbey of Mount Melleray, described the situation there:

even in this isolated place, on a most ungrateful and profitless mountain, we relieve from eighty to a hundred wandering poor daily, besides thirty three families around us, who are our regular weekly pensioners and whom we have, under God, saved from hopeless starvation. To have been enabled to do even this little for the sons and daughters of God, is a luxury beyond the banquet of kings.

Pius IX, Paul Cullen and Rome

In Rome, the rector of the Irish College, Paul Cullen, took many initiatives. Irish and British residents in Rome set up a committee to raise funds and Cullen's name is at the head of it. Pius IX, shocked by the Famine news, sent 1,000 Roman dollars to the Irish bishops in January 1847, an example followed by Cardinal Mai, the Secretary to the Congregation of the Index and Cardinal Fransoni, Secretary to the Congregation of Propaganda. Pius organized a triduum of prayer in the popular church of Sant' Andrea della Valle. On the first day the leader of the Liberal Catholics, the very eloquent Padre Gioacchino Ventura, who had great influence with Pius IX and was an ardent admirer of O'Connell, preached in Italian. On the second day, the Bishop of Montreal, where so many famine refugees were arriving, preached in French and, on the third day, Cullen preached in English.

The students and staff of the Irish College did without their dinner to raise money. The students at Propaganda College gave up the medals they had won. Cullen, wrote to his brother in Liverpool appealing to him to give what he could and asked his sister to auction a valuable cross she possessed, apparently a papal gift. The Romans responded generously. Diamonds, paintings, rings and gold watches poured into the Irish College. Two Romans, after hearing Ventura's sermon made an unusual gift--2,000 cubit palms of marble. A priest gave the silver buckles from his shoes, probably the only thing he had to spare, as Cullen remarked. In March, the Pope then took the unprecedented step of issuing an encyclical appealing to the whole Catholic world on behalf of the Famine victims. Bishops everywhere were asked to appoint three days for public prayers and "to exercise your charity in exhorting your people to contribute towards the relief of the Irish people." This appeal had a great impact throughout the Catholic world. French and Italian Catholics had raised money for Ireland but, with the Pope's appeal, the bishops throughout Europe made a more-spread appeal for funds. Belgium, the Netherlands, the German states, Austria and other European countries began to contribute money for relief. Subscriptions came from the capital of Tsarist Russia, St. Petersburg and from Instanbul, where the Sultan of Turkey, who was told of the Famine by his Irish physician, responded generously.

Of all the countries, the people of the United States were the most generous. State governments, mayors, bishops, priests, ex-slaves, Choctaw Indians in Oklahoma, American soldiers fighting in Mexico and Mexicans themselves all contributed. The first to organize relief in the U.S. that I came across, was Thomas O'Flaherty, parish priest of Salem, Massachusetts who, as early as December 1845, set up an Irish Charitable Relief Fund and collected over $2,000. By July 1846, the Irish papers recorded large sums sent by Irish priests to bishops and priests in Ireland. In December 1846 the Society of Friends in New York began their well-organized relief work. One of the foremost was Jacob Harvey, an Irishman who had settled in New York. They set about raising subscriptions "from the rich through John J. Palmer, President of the Merchant's Bank and [from] the poor through the Roman Catholic Bishop Hughes." The Quakers said later that for their own impressive and sustained relief operations, "the chief source whence the means at our disposal were derived was the munificent bounty of the citizens of the United States," adding that the supplies from America to Ireland "were on a scale unparalleled in history." The relief organizers remarked that it was the Irish emigrants who were the most generous in contributing to their funds. "I am happy to say that the poor laboring Irish are themselves doing their duty fully without any public meetings or addresses. They have been silently drafting their little savings to their relatives at home." Of greatest importance in keeping their relatives alive were the immense sums, running into millions of dollars, the Irish-Americans sent in the eagerly awaited "American letter," in which was often enclosed a ticket to America. "Doing fine like an American letter" became a type of proverb. It was the Irish poor who were feeding the Irish poor. Sometimes the parcels that the Quakers brought would have a label--i.e., for the people of the Claddagh.

The Jewish community was also generous. The banker August Belmont, who contributed $500, and over sixty leading citizens issued an appeal for relief funds in February. On 8 March, a meeting was held in the synagogue in Crosby Street "for the purpose of taking measures for the relief of the famishing thousands of their fellow-mortals in that unfortunate and destitute country, Ireland." Reverend Jacques Judah Lyons defended the giving of aid, saying: "It is true that there is but one common link between us and the sufferers...That link is humanity!" Vice-president George Dallas chaired a meeting in Washington on 9 February 1847 where an appeal was launched to all the towns and villages in the country. In the same month, the Irish papers reported that New York had contributed as much as $80,000 and claimed that this was "about the same sum that has been contributed at home from all the wealthy classes of Ireland to the Central Relief Committee for all Ireland."

Bishop Hughes maintained an active interest in the Famine and other Irish-born bishops also played their part. In February, William Tyler, bishop of Hartford, wrote to Archbishop Murray of Dublin explaining that, though the Catholics in this new diocese were few and poor, they promptly and generously responded to his appeal and he was sending $3,600 to the four Irish archbishops for distribution. John Fitzpatrick, bishop of Boston, read his pastoral on the Famine to his congregation and that night a relief committee was set up. By March, it had sent $20,000 to Archbishop Crolly, of Armagh. In all, the diocese of Boston subscribed $150,000. Bishops Peter Kenrick of Saint Louis, Michael Portier of Mobile and many others kept funds flowing to Ireland. Congress lent a warship, the Jamestown, on which food was so packed that the guns were removed to make room. The Irish-Americans kept coming on board to pack more stuff on so it sailed lower in the water than was intended. Then, in the record time of fifteen days, Captain Robert Forbes of Boston and volunteer sailors sailed it into Cork harbor to cheering crowds. The Quakers distributed the food through the Catholic clergy. Two months later, the Macedonian, captained by George DeKay from New York, repeated this act of mercy. The Irish Relief Committee of Philadelphia sent the John Walsh and the Lydia Anne to Derry and the St. George to Cork with supplies.

Catholic relief continued right up to 1850 and the L10 ($1,300 in today's money) Murray continued to send to priests in the most distressed areas, kept many alive. It was all the more necessary then because, at the end of 1847, Trevelyan decided that the distress was over which he repeated in February 1848. The effect was to close off charity. But the Famine was quite appalling again in the winter of 1848-9. Then, in 1849, the Society of Friends, after telling the government that the relief work was beyond the reach of private exertion, wound down the Society's heroic work. The Catholic relief continued right on up until 1850. It avoided the costs and delays of official relief, and does not appear to have been misused.

In South America, South Africa, India and Australia, Irish priests organized collections from their parishioners to send to their famine-stricken homeland. In Mauritius, Father Laval's account of the suffering in Ireland moved his Creole and Black parishioners to tears and they gave generously from the little they had.

For a more extensive treatment of this subject, see Donal Kerr, The Catholic Church and the Famine, (Dublin: Columbia Press, 1996).

Not only that but remember the establishment tried to use this opportunity to divide the people from their Church - Trevalyan forbade Catholic curates from working on relief committees. When the curates were excluded, at Trevelyan's behest, from the relief committees, Lord Monteagle protested to the viceroy: "You also exclude all the Roman Catholic curates. Without them, and here they are laboring like tigers for us working day and night, we could not move a stroke."

So the Church's role was written out of the official documents and what an effective ploy it was as is witnessed by both the gullible and those who continue the anti- catholic policy of the English to this day.

They know if you divorce Catholicism from the people of Ireland another distinctive cultural difference is removed and so the cultural conquest is more complete.
 

ottovonbismarck

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I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.
Source please
 


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