• It has come to our attention that some users may have been "banned" when they tried to change their passwords after the site was hacked due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software. This would have occurred around the end of February and does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you believe you were affected by this, please contact a staff member or use the Contact us link at the bottom of any forum page.

"The Feel Bad Factor".


Keith-M

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
15,779
Website
www.allkindsofeverything.ie
Back in the second half of 1990s and the first half of the noughties we were reminded about the national "Feel Good Factor". Yes property prices (as well as most other prices) were on the rise, but most people were able to find jobs and cope. Beyond the economy, things were also looking good. We were casting aside the pervasive influence of the Catholic church, Irish writers, musicians, singers and sport people were making their mark on the international stage. Dublin was regularly noted as the "coolest" capital city in Europe and peace had come to Northern Ireland. Emigration had turned to immigration For the first time since the Free State had left the U.K. , there seemed to be a justification for Ireland going it alone.

Now move the clock forward to today. The national air of doom and gloom is palpable. No amount of cheer-leading by RTÉ and sympathetic elements within the media can disguise that we are among the sickest of the sick men of Europe, economically. While previous governments stood up to Europe in making sure we got our share of grant aid and protected our tax regime, the current government seems intent on being as subservient as possible to our European neighbours. Recessionary budget after recessionary budget have failed to tackle the core issue; the government continues to spend more than it takes in taxes. Our younger generation are again voting with their feet and leaving the country. The suicide rate is at an all time high.

I have followed politics and current affairs in this country since the 1970s and I don't believe that national morale has ever been so low. There's a sense that it makes no difference, who's in government. No one will do anything of substance to turn things around. No one has the "vision thing" of how we can get out of this seemingly bottomless spiral of recession, unemployment. There seems to be a national sense of longing. The Portuguese have a word; "saudade" that doesn't easily translate to English, but those that understand it will know what I mean. Our national "feel bad factor" is at record levels.
 

Clanrickard

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
33,054
For the first time since the Free State had left the U.K. , there seemed to be a justification for Ireland going it alone.
The justification is that we are a free people and don't to live under the rue of the House of Windsor. Economics doesn't come into it. And to address the OP I don't think ther eis a single person, male or female amongst our visionless lemmings in Leinster House who could change the mood. In short we need a Reagen or a Thatcher.
 

Dublin 4

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
12,993
I've noticed a few Pollyanna spoofers that I know even starting to slow down.

Marion Finucane is talking about the budget now & Ken Murphy from the Law Society is talking about the "huge level of fear around".

The fear seems to be suffocating the spin...
 

davoid

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 16, 2011
Messages
9,711
I've noticed a few Pollyanna spoofers that I know even starting to slow down.

Marion Finucane is talking about the budget now & Ken Murphy from the Law Society is talking about the "huge level of fear around".

The fear seems to be suffocating the spin...
yes but the feel bad factor is fed by the media.

For example Chris o Donoghue on newstalk repeatedly referring to the propsed cuts of 12 euro a month as slashing child benefit. A cut of 7% is not slashing.

But using the word slashing repeatedly helps to stir outrage.
 

firefly123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
28,158
Oops sorry! Accidentally walked in on a right wing doom porn love in. Don't mind me as I slowly back out.
 

Keith-M

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
15,779
Website
www.allkindsofeverything.ie
yes but the feel bad factor is fed by the media.

For example Chris o Donoghue on newstalk repeatedly referring to the propsed cuts of 12 euro a month as slashing child benefit. A cut of 7% is not slashing.

But using the word slashing repeatedly helps to stir outrage.
If it's €12 a month for an unemployed person with 3-4 children then it's a pretty steep drop. What happened to means-testing child benefit?
 

wombat

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
32,011
For example Chris o Donoghue on newstalk repeatedly referring to the propsed cuts of 12 euro a month as slashing child benefit. A cut of 7% is not slashing.

But using the word slashing repeatedly helps to stir outrage.
The media would like to stir outrage, they would enjoy reporting on riots and burning (of other peoples' cars) in the streets but they are failing. Instead, they are spreading fear and misery among those who depend on state spending.
 

ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,599
Back in the second half of 1990s and the first half of the noughties we were reminded about the national "Feel Good Factor". Yes property prices (as well as most other prices) were on the rise, but most people were able to find jobs and cope. Beyond the economy, things were also looking good. We were casting aside the pervasive influence of the Catholic church, Irish writers, musicians, singers and sport people were making their mark on the international stage. Dublin was regularly noted as the "coolest" capital city in Europe and peace had come to Northern Ireland. Emigration had turned to immigration For the first time since the Free State had left the U.K. , there seemed to be a justification for Ireland going it alone.

Now move the clock forward to today. The national air of doom and gloom is palpable. No amount of cheer-leading by RTÉ and sympathetic elements within the media can disguise that we are among the sickest of the sick men of Europe, economically. While previous governments stood up to Europe in making sure we got our share of grant aid and protected our tax regime, the current government seems intent on being as subservient as possible to our European neighbours. Recessionary budget after recessionary budget have failed to tackle the core issue; the government continues to spend more than it takes in taxes. Our younger generation are again voting with their feet and leaving the country. The suicide rate is at an all time high.

I have followed politics and current affairs in this country since the 1970s and I don't believe that national morale has ever been so low. There's a sense that it makes no difference, who's in government. No one will do anything of substance to turn things around. No one has the "vision thing" of how we can get out of this seemingly bottomless spiral of recession, unemployment. There seems to be a national sense of longing. The Portuguese have a word; "saudade" that doesn't easily translate to English, but those that understand it will know what I mean. Our national "feel bad factor" is at record levels.
Yet another thread by Keith-M on why Ireland is soooo crap and uses smoke and mirrors to suggest we rejoin the UK. Boring.
 

tokkie

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
18,895
The justification is that we are a free people and don't to live under the rue of the House of Windsor. Economics doesn't come into it. And to address the OP I don't think ther eis a single person, male or female amongst our visionless lemmings in Leinster House who could change the mood. In short we need a Reagen or a Thatcher.
Right wing doom porn love in, indeed.
 

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
56,230
Oops sorry! Accidentally walked in on a right wing doom porn love in. Don't mind me as I slowly back out.
How many posts before their favourite pin-up girl (clue: also sells frozen 'food') gets a mention?
 

anationoceagain

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
2,754
The justification is that we are a free people and don't to live under the rue of the House of Windsor. Economics doesn't come into it. And to address the OP I don't think ther eis a single person, male or female amongst our visionless lemmings in Leinster House who could change the mood. In short we need a Reagen or a Thatcher.
Yes, a Reagan or Thatcher..lets destroy western manufacturing and build a pyramid economy built on debt..Hang on, already done.
 

Clanrickard

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
33,054
Yes, a Reagan or Thatcher..lets destroy western manufacturing and build a pyramid economy built on debt..Hang on, already done.
I was referring to galvinising the nation to face the crisis. Britain was in free fall when Thatcher took over and was far stronger after she left.
 

firefly123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
28,158
I was referring to galvinising the nation to face the crisis. Britain was in free fall when Thatcher took over and was far stronger after she left.
Well Galvinising the southern part at the expense of all the other parts.
 

Mushroom

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
15,777
Kerry Katona?
Complete with man-made boobs that have had more hands on them than the front door handle of the VD clinic in James's Hospital!
 

tokkie

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
18,895
I was referring to galvinising the nation to face the crisis. Britain was in free fall when Thatcher took over and was far stronger after she left.
But Thatcher did not galvanise the British nation.
 

anationoceagain

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
2,754
I was referring to galvinising the nation to face the crisis. Britain was in free fall when Thatcher took over and was far stronger after she left.
Was she? Look at what she did to civic society...indeed explore the myth that she reduced state spending. Britain is in a mess, Blair merely threw money at the problem to cover up structural difficulties. Thatcher galvanised southern England and the financial sector to create a debt fuelled economy which gave the impression of real financial growth. Britain is reverting to the problems of the winter of discontent, with a fractured civil society. Next time you go for a pint north of Watford ask the locals how Maggie glavanized Britain.
 

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
56,230
Once the wealthy get wealthier it is classified as success, or in this case "galvanising the nation"
Ah yes, trickle-up economics. Just what we need.
 
Top