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The flag that dare not show its colours


Iphonista

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Jun 6, 2012
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The small town just south of the border where I live is currently festooned with the flags of many nations as part of the Saint Patrick's Weekend celebrations. While out and about this morning, I saw along with lots of Irish tricolours, the flags of, for example, Estonia, Lithuania, Denmark, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, France, Spain.... even bizarrely Cuba!

I've noticed this before and I think it's quite bizarre: there's no Union Jack - not that I can see, anyway. Could other people check around their towns? Are there many international flags flying and if so, is the flag of our nearest neighbour amongst them? Or is this just a hardline, border thing?
 

ne0ica

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Oct 22, 2009
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The small town just south of the border where I live is currently festooned with the flags of many nations as part of the Saint Patrick's Weekend celebrations. While out and about this morning, I saw along with lots of Irish tricolours, the flags of, for example, Estonia, Lithuania, Denmark, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, France, Spain.... even bizarrely Cuba!

I've noticed this before and I think it's quite bizarre: there's no Union Jack - not that I can see, anyway. Could other people check around their towns? Are there many international flags flying and if so, is the flag of our nearest neighbour amongst them? Or is this just a hardline, border thing?
The question is this, why are other flags flying on St Patricks day? Anyway if you want to see the Union Jack used as bunting on lamposts etc just drive north of the border and you will get your fill.
 
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Iphonista

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The question is this, why are other flags flying on St Patricks day? Anyway if you want to see the Union Jack used as buting on lamposts etc just drive north of the border and you will get your fill.
Well, I'm not that bothered to be honest. It's not the seeing of it, but I don't like discrimination.
 

asterix

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Dec 19, 2008
Messages
288
Like ne0ica, I don't see what flags-of-all-nations has to do with St Patrick's Day, and don't suppose many towns have gone with that theme for their decorations.

As to why flags-of-all-nations displays in the Republic exclude the Union Flag, well yeah I think we know why. The common workaround in recent years is to fly the English, Scottish and Welsh flags. Lots of tourist hotels etc do that. It leaves nobody excluded.... except northern Unionists.
 
D

Dylan2010

I was wondering for a minute why the Mexicans were celebrating the day.....need coffee
 
D

Dylan2010

If you find that hard to understand walk into any known loyalist pub in Belfast wearing a green hat and a Tri Colour on Sunday and you will have two more colours added all over your body as you come sailing out the door if your lucky.
How long would you last in Noctors pub in Sherrif St with a Rangers top?
 

Dublin 4

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Feb 6, 2011
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12,993
The small town just south of the border where I live is currently festooned with the flags of many nations as part of the Saint Patrick's Weekend celebrations. While out and about this morning, I saw along with lots of Irish tricolours, the flags of, for example, Estonia, Lithuania, Denmark, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, France, Spain.... even bizarrely Cuba!

I've noticed this before and I think it's quite bizarre: there's no Union Jack - not that I can see, anyway. Could other people check around their towns? Are there many international flags flying and if so, is the flag of our nearest neighbour amongst them? Or is this just a hardline, border thing?
Not a Union Jack fan but hopefully soon you could see this :p

 

Orbit v2

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Prior to the GFA, union jacks were as common as hen's teeth in this jurisdiction. Afterwards, I noticed them appearing in a few (semi - official) locations like Dublin Airport. But, they are still rare enough. The issue is sometimes side-stepped by flying the flags of the individual nations.

To be fair though, I think I told the story of last Summer when up at the Giant's Causeway, there was a sign in the shop written in English, French and German saying they accepted Euros. There was a French flag beside the French one and a German flag beside the German one, but the English one was all on its lonesome. It didn't make sense to put a UK or US flag beside it (since it wasn't directed at citizens of those countries), but they couldn't bring themselves to put a tricolour bside it.
 

EvotingMachine0197

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Feb 17, 2006
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The small town just south of the border where I live is currently festooned with the flags of many nations as part of the Saint Patrick's Weekend celebrations. While out and about this morning, I saw along with lots of Irish tricolours, the flags of, for example, Estonia, Lithuania, Denmark, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, France, Spain.... even bizarrely Cuba!

I've noticed this before and I think it's quite bizarre: there's no Union Jack - not that I can see, anyway. Could other people check around their towns? Are there many international flags flying and if so, is the flag of our nearest neighbour amongst them? Or is this just a hardline, border thing?
Are these flags hanging from people's houses or do you mean in hotels etc?

If they are from houses it may be just people acknowledging St. Patrick's day while at the same time expressing their own nationality. As for the UJ, I presume the don't want to invite the wrath of a brick throwing scumbag.
 

Clanrickard

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Apr 25, 2008
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33,038
If you find that hard to understand walk into any known loyalist pub in Belfast wearing a green hat and a Tri Colour on Sunday and you will have two more colours added all over your body as you come sailing out the door if your lucky.
I have done and nothing happened. Most people have a sense of perspective.
 

Dublin 4

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That's why there are at least 99 Peace Lines in Belfast alone.

At the time of the GFA there were only 22 in the whole of the North...
 

Iphonista

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Jun 6, 2012
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4,200
Like ne0ica, I don't see what flags-of-all-nations has to do with St Patrick's Day, and don't suppose many towns have gone with that theme for their decorations.

As to why flags-of-all-nations displays in the Republic exclude the Union Flag, well yeah I think we know why. The common workaround in recent years is to fly the English, Scottish and Welsh flags. Lots of tourist hotels etc do that. It leaves nobody excluded.... except northern Unionists.
Don't know and don't care. If the flag of Cuba is up, so should the UJ.

There are no Scottish, English or Welsh flags out either FTR.
 

sport02

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Sep 25, 2010
Messages
19,656
Come to Dublin and you will see English,Scottish and Welsh flags and not just on rugby weekends.
As for the UJ, it is a ghastly looking flag, few and far between on this side of the water, thank God.
 

DuineEile

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Aug 29, 2010
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14,939
Well, I'm not that bothered to be honest. It's not the seeing of it, but I don't like discrimination.


Have you checked for the Lesotho flag?


Or the Nepalese flag?

Or are you particularly sensitive to one type of discrimination?


If for instance the Union Jack had been flying, but the Croatian flag had not, would you even have noticed?
Did you even notice? Was the Croatian flag flying? (no going back to take a peek now).


D
 

Telemachus

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Apr 8, 2004
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6,565
Website
en.wikipedia.org
The question is this, why are other flags flying on St Patricks day? Anyway if you want to see the Union Jack used as bunting on lamposts etc just drive north of the border and you will get your fill.
You'll note St Patricks days is being realigned by left wing elements as a multicultural festival - I'm reading something on one of the immigration quangoes sites at the moment mentioning that since St. Patrick was Welsh, the days is in fact a celebration for migrants.

Its almost a complete inversion of the national symbolism of the day itself.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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Oct 12, 2009
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EARLY IN 1912, the Ulster Unionist Council prepared a great demonstration against the Third Home Rule Bill to be addressed by the new leader of the Conservative Party, Andrew Bonar Law. It was to be held at the agricultural show grounds at Balmoral, a south Belfast suburb, on Easter Tuesday, April 9th

Seventy trains brought in demonstrators from all over Ulster. Seventy English, Scottish and Welsh Conservative MPs crossed the Irish Sea to take part. More than 100,000 men marched in military formation past the platforms before separating into two streams passing on either side of the saluting base.

The proceedings opened with prayers and the singing of the 90th Psalm. Then, a resolution against Home Rule was passed with rousing acclamation; immediately afterwards, from a 90-foot flagstaff rising from a tower in the centre of the grounds, the largest Union Jack ever woven was broken and unfurled.

Law knew Ulster well. His father, a Presbyterian minister, was born in Coleraine, and his brother was the local doctor there. For the last five years of his father’s life, he had visited Ulster every weekend. Now, as he stepped forward to speak, he knew that a reference to the Siege of Derry would strike a chord in the hearts of his listeners as he assured them that their cause was not Ulster’s alone but that of the Empire.

“Once more you hold the pass, the pass for the Empire. You are a besieged city. The timid have left you: your Lundys have betrayed you; but you have closed the gates. The Government have erected by their Parliament Act a boom against you to shut you off from the help of the British people. You will burst that boom,” he said.

This formidable display of loyalist strength was an outward and visible sign, an open declaration, that the Conservative Party had made a fateful decision – it had unequivocally committed itself to giving unswerving support to all that Ulster unionists intended to do to oppose Home Rule.
Charged with symbolism or what?

Btw I heard thwe actual flag was 15 meters long! Couldn't be true could it?
 

CarnivalOfAction

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Joined
Jun 15, 2010
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16,545
The small town just south of the border where I live is currently festooned with the flags of many nations as part of the Saint Patrick's Weekend celebrations. While out and about this morning, I saw along with lots of Irish tricolours, the flags of, for example, Estonia, Lithuania, Denmark, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, France, Spain.... even bizarrely Cuba!

I've noticed this before and I think it's quite bizarre: there's no Union Jack - not that I can see, anyway. Could other people check around their towns? Are there many international flags flying and if so, is the flag of our nearest neighbour amongst them? Or is this just a hardline, border thing?
May possibly have something to do with the British Forces bombing Dundalk, Castleblaney, Monaghan, Clones, Belturbet, Pettigo and others.

Justice For The Forgotten
 
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sondagefaux

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Jun 2, 2009
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15,682
Have you been to Scotland recently? Very, very rare to seen the UJ flying anywhere there, even on public buildings.
 
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