The French Parliament votes that anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.

Golah veNekhar

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I suspect that there are internal as well as external reasons for this. The French State has been moving ever closer to banning Equality and Reconciliation the Party of Alain Soral, who was formerly a leading member of the French Communist Party and a member of the central committee of the Front National, who is currently now in prison over trumped up charges. I think he is one of the few people actually thinking seriously about France's future and indeed one of the few serious concrete political thinkers left in Western Europe. This was of course pushed by Bernard Henri-Levy which I think should raise questions about- anti-Semitism is actually something real in France unlike in Ireland and Britain where it is generally seen as a fringe and distasteful cranky thing, and it exists not just among the Muslims but among both the indigenous right and to a lesser extent the indigenous left. While a lot of right wing anti-Semites do support the Zionist project (largely because they want somewhere to kick Bernard Henri-Levy and Alain Frinkelkraut out to) they are bound to see as confirmation of conspiracy theories about Jews being in total control. So what is Bernard Henri-Levy playing at? The likelihood that he has not thought this through remains a possibility that should not be dismissed.

There are of course legal consequences of this. Anti-Semitism as such is not tolerated in French Law. Those campaigning against the Zionist State's sadistic treatment of the indigenous population will face increasing difficulties and now at a time when the two-state solution has been abandoned formally even by an increasing number of Zionist politicians in Palestine and has been rendered virtually impossible by the settlements project on the West Bank.

French parliament decides anti-Zionism is antisemitism
 


Eire1976

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This will likely make antisemitism more mainstream, as those who are upset by Israel's expansionism, will just go for it now.
 

petaljam

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It's still fairly controversial, and wasn't (allegedly) meant to do more than recognise that anti semitism is often the real motivation behind something that's expressed as anti Zionism.

On the whole I think it does go too far, and is too close to thought-crime.
 

McTell

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It's still fairly controversial, and wasn't (allegedly) meant to do more than recognise that anti semitism is often the real motivation behind something that's expressed as anti Zionism.

On the whole I think it does go too far, and is too close to thought-crime.

I don't mind these kinds of laws being passed, but they also have to say where the dividing line is.

Reporting a pally village being bombed could be anti-semitic. Or is it?
 

petaljam

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I don't mind these kinds of laws being passed, but they also have to say where the dividing line is.

Reporting a pally village being bombed could be anti-semitic. Or is it?
No, reporting facts isn't at issue. It's about expressing the belief that there should be no Israeli (or no Jewish perhaps) state at all. That's where this bill goes much farther than being about anti semitism per se. IMO.
 

parentheses

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Leftists have been screaming and clapping in favor of Hate-Speech laws.

Ironically, one of the first consequences will be that they will be muzzled if they attempt to criticize Israel.
 

Ardillaun

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Leftists have been screaming and clapping in favor of Hate-Speech laws.

Ironically, one of the first consequences will be that they will be muzzled if they attempt to criticize Israel.
That applies both ways though, doesn’t it? May of those on the right who usually complain about political correctness see no problem with laws like this.
 

Sync

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It's still fairly controversial, and wasn't (allegedly) meant to do more than recognise that anti semitism is often the real motivation behind something that's expressed as anti Zionism.
Yeah
1. I don't think it's a good idea to link the two in legislation
2. If you're going to do it, you've got to take a REALLY narrow view of what "zionism" is, which would have to be limited to Israel's right to exist in line with the UN grant, without its expansions over the last 50 years.

It's a ridiculously tight line, it's going to lead to a million frivolous cases being brought.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
No, reporting facts isn't at issue. It's about expressing the belief that there should be no Israeli (or no Jewish perhaps) state at all. That's where this bill goes much farther than being about anti semitism per se. IMO.
Well that's me buggered in France. There's a fair amount of evidence that the claim to a state is based itself on a religious claim to a davidian kingdom, for which there is no evidence in existence at all beyond religious belief.

Going to be interesting should an academic in France mention this by accident in a paper. Mind you, they are all well wary of the bully boys of the hasbara by now.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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If you are sceptical about the claims of Zionism, and everyone has every right to be sceptical of any claim until proven beyond doubt, then you could very well end up in France with a constitutional issue because that is introducing sideways the notion that religious beliefs require religious protection and that is not within the French constitution or framing of the Republic.

Could very well be challenged I suspect in French courts.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
The boy who laughed at the King parading his new invisible trousers. Could open up a whole new area of semi-canon law for any number of religions. We'll have the Scientologists up next demanding that Cthulhu be protected in law.

After all, to be anti Cthulhu is to be automatically anti-Scientology isn't it? And Scientologists have the right of return and cultural claim on most of the Universe based on their religion whereas Israel only has a small dusty corner of a place on earth. And a pretty shaky evidential basis for that n'all.
 

james toney

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France’s National Assembly on Tuesday passed a resolution conflating support for Palestinian equality with hatred of Jews – an initiative supported by the country’s Israel lobby.
But most lawmakers did not take part in the vote.
Meanwhile, Wallonia, one of Belgium’s three federal regions, confirmed that it is pulling back on official cooperation with Israel, citing Israeli violations of international law.
Fewer than half of the 577 members of France’s lower house were present for Tuesday’s vote.

This week, a group of 129 Jewish and Israeli scholars signed a petition calling on the French National Assembly not to support the resolution.
The signatories criticize the proposal for reducing Israel to a “collective composed of Jewish citizens,” thereby obliterating the Palestinians citizens of the country, as well as those Jews who hold anti-Zionist opinions. They also argue that it reduces the Palestinian experience.

“For Palestinians, Zionism means dispossession, displacement, occupation and structural inequality. It is cynical and insensitive to stigmatize them as anti-Semites for opposing Zionism,” the letter says.
“They oppose Zionism not because they hate Jews, but because they experience Zionism as an oppressive political movement.”
The resolution espouses an agenda promoted by Benjamin Netanyahu’s government, the academics argue, to label opposition to its policies as anti-Semitic in order to curb dissenting voices.
The letter, published in French daily Le Monde among others, takes the fact that Sylvain Maillard attended an event with Israeli settler leader Yossi Dagan a few days after proposing the resolution as an example of the fact that efforts by the Israeli government to use anti—Semitism as a way to shield itself from criticism "are getting a political tailwind, also in France."
 


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