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The future of the Republican Party

GDPR

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224,089
Yes, as a non-American citizen I supported Bill Clinton.

In retrospect, only a very stupid person would not (with the limited knowledge we had then), since he presided over the biggest boom in American history, and his successor (whom I have no doubt you supported to the hilt) blew the surplus, destroyed the US economy, and started a war that devastated the Middle East.

Of course, I supported Al Gore. I am proud to say I did.

And who but a very stupid person (like you, probably) would regret that he did not win the Presidency, given the havoc wreaked by the man you supported, even after failing to win the popular vote.
Are you a US citizen now?
 


owedtojoy

Well-known member
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Feb 27, 2010
Messages
46,636
Are you a US citizen now?
No, not an ambition of mine.

Thomas Jefferson once said "France is every man's second country", but I think in our time that has been replaced by the USA, particularly for English-speakers. One of the results of the Trump years, as of the Bush years, is the increasing rejection of the US as a model.
 

wombat

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Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
32,668
No, not an ambition of mine.

Thomas Jefferson once said "France is every man's second country", but I think in our time that has been replaced by the USA, particularly for English-speakers. One of the results of the Trump years, as of the Bush years, is the increasing rejection of the US as a model.
One of the American characteristics that I admire is their ability to admit mistakes and change their minds. I expect the next president will be an experienced politician with a charisma deficit.
 

GDPR

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Messages
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No, not an ambition of mine.

Thomas Jefferson once said "France is every man's second country", but I think in our time that has been replaced by the USA, particularly for English-speakers. One of the results of the Trump years, as of the Bush years, is the increasing rejection of the US as a model.
So, like me, you are watching from the sidelines (or the peanut gallery) this magnificently horrendous spectacle that is US politics. I thought you had voted in 2016.

I have no ambition to be a US citizen or ever to live there, just to visit occasionally as I have friends there, mainly in California. Having two citizenships is enough for me (Australian and Irish) though I have lived in GB long enough to apply to be Brit.
 

GDPR

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One of the American characteristics that I admire is their ability to admit mistakes and change their minds. I expect the next president will be an experienced politician with a charisma deficit.
An HRC sort? Not HRC of course. Her days as a POTUS candidate are over and as O'Sullivan Bere keeps reminding us she is merely a private citizen now.

I'd hope for an experienced politician with a charisma deficit but intelligent too and open-minded. Preferably a democrat.
 

cropbeye

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Aug 3, 2006
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Then why did no serious Democrat candidate put themselves forward to challenge Hilary.
 

owedtojoy

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Feb 27, 2010
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One of the American characteristics that I admire is their ability to admit mistakes and change their minds. I expect the next president will be an experienced politician with a charisma deficit.
Maybe Al Gore should have another go? ;)

/joking
 

owedtojoy

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An HRC sort? Not HRC of course. Her days as a POTUS candidate are over and as O'Sullivan Bere keeps reminding us she is merely a private citizen now.

I'd hope for an experienced politician with a charisma deficit but intelligent too and open-minded. Preferably a democrat.
I agree. No TV/ Celebrity/ Moghul candidates, please. No Oprah, No Zuckerberg.

"Charisma" is the least trustworthy characteristic a politician could have - it can hide a vacuum. On a list of positive factors, it should come bottom.
 

owedtojoy

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Messages
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So, like me, you are watching from the sidelines (or the peanut gallery) this magnificently horrendous spectacle that is US politics. I thought you had voted in 2016.

I have no ambition to be a US citizen or ever to live there, just to visit occasionally as I have friends there, mainly in California. Having two citizenships is enough for me (Australian and Irish) though I have lived in GB long enough to apply to be Brit.
I made many visits to the US, mainly to New England and California, but on business. I was lucky enough to be able to stay over during some weekends and public holidays. I have also worked with dozens of Americans, and developed friendly relations with them - I have to say they are the type of people who mainly mirror my own perceptions of American life.

Birds of a feather flock together, these guys were mainly east coast professionals and some immigrants and grandchildren of immigrants too. So I am not saying my acquaintances prove anything about America. It is (or was) a rich and open society with all sorts of opinions.

I worked twice for Indian managers who had gone to the US for do their doctorates, and stayed for their green cards. Both were probably the smartest guys I ever met, and you have to admire the way the US attracts and keeps people like that (or used to).

My plan is to return to the US on vacation, and meet some old friends, but that must await the departure of Trump from office.
 

GDPR

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New alarm among Republicans that Democrats could win big this year

A raft of retirements, difficulty recruiting candidates and President Trump’s continuing pattern of throwing his party off message have prompted new alarm among Republicans that they could be facing a Democratic electoral wave in November.

But the dems should not become complacent, as some did in 2016. There are warnings of this in the Comments to this article
 

GDPR

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More truthfully, he wasn't allowed win.
More truthfully, he won only caucuses and one state via election.

Do tell me how he wasn't allowed win? If they were preventing him from winning, how come they didn't pull the plug on him much earlier? His campaign was damaging HRC.
 

GDPR

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The next GOP panic: Governors races

Republicans concede that a handful of once-competitive battlegrounds are nearly out of reach for them in 2018.

The GOP is forced to defend 13 states that former President Barack Obama won — from Maine to New Mexico to Wisconsin — while Democrats are protecting just one — Pennsylvania — that fell to Trump.
…
Much of the GOP anxiety stems from the way a handful of potentially competitive races have broken strongly toward the Democratic candidate. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham is now heavily favored to replace Republican Gov. Susana Martinez in New Mexico, while multiple top New York Republicans have passed on challenging Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo. According to top strategists from both parties, similar skepticism about GOP chances has overtaken the races in Pennsylvania — where Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf is running for reelection — and Maine, where Republican Gov. Paul LePage is vacating his seat.

While Republicans still see a clear opportunity to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy in Connecticut, they acknowledge they will likely need to spend more resources than they hoped to defend their seats in Ohio, Michigan, Florida, New Hampshire, Illinois and even Maryland, where Gov. Larry Hogan remains popular despite the state’s heavily liberal skew.

Add in the costs of competing in expensive battlegrounds like Nevada, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Colorado, and it means they are less likely to spend extensive money or resources to flip once-vulnerable Democratic seats in Rhode Island or Oregon.

Meanwhile, Democrats are on the offensive, expanding their sights into races where they usually wouldn’t venture.
 
Joined
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The next GOP panic: Governors races

Republicans concede that a handful of once-competitive battlegrounds are nearly out of reach for them in 2018.

The GOP is forced to defend 13 states that former President Barack Obama won — from Maine to New Mexico to Wisconsin — while Democrats are protecting just one — Pennsylvania — that fell to Trump.

Much of the GOP anxiety stems from the way a handful of potentially competitive races have broken strongly toward the Democratic candidate. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham is now heavily favored to replace Republican Gov. Susana Martinez in New Mexico, while multiple top New York Republicans have passed on challenging Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo. According to top strategists from both parties, similar skepticism about GOP chances has overtaken the races in Pennsylvania — where Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf is running for reelection — and Maine, where Republican Gov. Paul LePage is vacating his seat.

While Republicans still see a clear opportunity to replace outgoing Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy in Connecticut, they acknowledge they will likely need to spend more resources than they hoped to defend their seats in Ohio, Michigan, Florida, New Hampshire, Illinois and even Maryland, where Gov. Larry Hogan remains popular despite the state’s heavily liberal skew.

Add in the costs of competing in expensive battlegrounds like Nevada, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Colorado, and it means they are less likely to spend extensive money or resources to flip once-vulnerable Democratic seats in Rhode Island or Oregon.

Meanwhile, Democrats are on the offensive, expanding their sights into races where they usually wouldn’t venture.
Difference is GOP have a President who will happily assist GOP candidates state.
 

paddycomeback

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Aug 19, 2011
Messages
1,928
Probably a need for a separate thread on this (there is one for the Dems) as there is movement in the GOP station - hopeless, chaotic movement. Now, according to this article from Vanity Fair, the GOP has to settle into another routine post-Bannon:

[h=1]WITH BANNON GONE, THE G.O.P. SCRAMBLES FOR AN AGENDA[/h]Their populist bogeyman excommunicated, the MAGA crowd has reverted to its pleasantly nebulous state of making America great again—whatever that means

Will the GOP's agenda be as damaging and pointless as it has been so far?
Oh good, I thought, a thread about Fianna Fail. But no, it's Grace banging her drum - again. FFS there are plenty of forums for discussing American politics, why are the mods allowing this monopolisation?
 

GDPR

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Messages
224,089
Oh good, I thought, a thread about Fianna Fail. But no, it's Grace banging her drum - again. FFS there are plenty of forums for discussing American politics, why are the mods allowing this monopolisation?
You are a drongo. :) This is the US politics forum.

I know very little about Fianna Fail, but I do know its official name is not Republican Party, and I would not discuss it in the US Politics forum...
 

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