The Good News Bible for Ireland

Malbekh

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Apr 30, 2009
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3,012
Greetings.

Above all, and in all things, there is hope. I'm not here to preach any religious doctrine, but I am here to offer perhaps an alternative view that might salve and ease some of your minds.

Our country is flawed, and the heart of that flaw lies in our political system and its governance of the State. We have a constitution that urgently needs reform, we have a legal, health, social and financial structure that needs to be stripped down to the bone and built back up again. We have a local government which is a non-entity in terms of power, and what power it has, it has abused. But above all, we have a parliament that fails to function in its basic role, to promote the welfare of the nation and its citizens above the needs of the body politic.

The legacy of the previous administration (2002 - 2007) was its collective failure to implement the changes necessary. Especially as the wherewithal to facilitate such changes - the presence of large reserves of cash - was available to keep the masses and the unions content whilst it did so.

The legacy of the current administration (2007 - 2011) we already know and nothing I can say would reflect or change what we all feel after the events of this week. But they at least have accomplished two achievements of note. Firstly, they have greatly focussed all our minds on how flawed Irish society had become and what changes we might like to see happen, and secondly, they have decapitated themselves from the body politic in such a manner that I cannot conceive any circumstances in which they will ever return.

As a country over the last 10 years we have completely lost the run of ourselves collectively and individually. This decade will see us return to ourselves if we rekindle our Christian and community values. The next government has a mandate for reform, and while we are not quite on election footing yet, it is imperative that all the political parties, even the ones in government, recognise that basic necessity. There has never been a better time to campaign for reform, nor has there been a better appetite to accept it.

The next government will have the largest majority ever in the Dáil. They will have a remit from the people to effect the changes necessary. They have legacy issues which they can use to absolve themselves from the wrath of the electorate, and finally they have the severity of the crisis as well as the parental control of the EU/IMF to ignore the threats and protests of the elites.

Our economy is not flawed. Our people are not flawed. There are unbelievably good prospects for this economy, based as it is on our capacity to export, our ability to innovate, our desire to communicate, and indeed our appreciation of life and our social and human skills.

We will recover. We will see our budget deficit become a surplus with 5 years. We will see the massive structural changes necessary throughout our political and economic come to fruition. We will, I suppose, find our mojo again.

It is not my intention to belittle the difficulties ahead of us. We really are at an all-time low. The seriousness of the legacy bequeathed to us by FF and its partners leaves a collective paralysis on the nation. But our attributes will see us through. We will survive this, though probably as much because we have no choice.

Above all, there is hope.
 


martino

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Joined
Feb 22, 2009
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1,379
Good post and I hope you're right. The system is broken and needs to be rebuilt-that's for sure. I think people are beginning to get over the denial phase, and ask themselves 'how could we have been so foolish to let this happen?' I think people are hurt too by how their trust has been abused. There is a lot of potential in this country as you say and everything needs to be examined. I think we also need to lose a lot of the 'old' preconceptions of ourselves and redefine Ireland as a dynamic, lean, mean exporting machine. The fat needs to be cut from every sector in society and the focus placed on efficiency. God save Ireland!
 

drummed

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Oct 22, 2010
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36,191
Don't disagree with the basic substance of your views but i feel most of the people on here are gripped by an irrational expectation that changing the present goverment will somehow change the nature of politics itself. It's all very well getting shut of the present lot but who in leinster house at present inspires? At least this bunch have high comic value. Note the candidates in Donegal, with one possible exception, party hacks them all. These people are the past, present and the future. Change that and we're going somewhere.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2009
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It's easier, much easier, to fight the enemy without. It's fighting the enemy within which is nigh on impossible.

Until everyone on this beknighted island understands exactly who the enemy is and accepts that they must be routed, no matter what the pain, we will never again be a nation that although tiny, has changed and shaped this world. We can do it, but we have to accept that the enemy is within, and defeat them by taking back that which we so freely gave. Our trust.
 

Panopticon

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May 27, 2009
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I am more sceptical. Our Christian and community values gave us the permanent emigration economy and the abuse of young children and teenagers by priests.

It seems incredibly controversial to say it this week, but yes we are better off today than we were 50 - even 20 - years ago. The solution is to bring us back to the tolerant, dynamic, pro-enterprise era of the 1990s, because even with all its flaws, it was better than the alternative that we had tried for so long. We tried community and Christianity for long enough. It wasn't enough to keep people on the island.
 

mistercrabs

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Nov 20, 2010
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Insofar as Christian values mean bullying by the Catholic Church, denial of basic rights to people on the basis of religious conviction, persecution of homosexuals, subjugation of women, and the coverup of the industrialised rape of children, I think we can do without them thank you very much. And the notion that Christian values are in fact NOT the values demonstrated by the Church over the last 2000 years while it destroyed and retarded Europe and Ireland - well convincing people of this is as slick a rebranding exercise as the Republicans just pulled off in America.
 

Mitsui2

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Nov 13, 2009
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32,351
Insofar as Christian values mean bullying by the Catholic Church, denial of basic rights to people on the basis of religious conviction, persecution of homosexuals, subjugation of women, and the coverup of the industrialised rape of children, I think we can do without them thank you very much. And the notion that Christian values are in fact NOT the values demonstrated by the Church over the last 2000 years while it destroyed and retarded Europe and Ireland - well convincing people of this is as slick a rebranding exercise as the Republicans just pulled off in America.
Mistercrabs, this is clearly news to you, but Christianity and Catholicism are not the same thing. And I speak as someone who's been fully aware of his own atheism, and appalled by the tawdriness of the Irish Catholic church, from the age of about 6 - which was in 1963.

I can't imagine a post like the above in any country except Ireland - just goes to show how successful the Catholic Church was back in the day in constructing the paradigm used by the populace: "for Christian, read Catholic". Which folks obviously still do.
 

darkhorse

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Dec 12, 2005
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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGVSTsgcCvw&feature=related]YouTube - Redemption Song - Johnny Cash and Joe Strummer[/ame]
 

mistercrabs

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Nov 20, 2010
Messages
621
Mistercrabs, this is clearly news to you, but Christianity and Catholicism are not the same thing. And I speak as someone who's been fully aware of his own atheism, and appalled by the tawdriness of the Irish Catholic church, from the age of about 6 - which was in 1963.

I can't imagine a post like the above in any country except Ireland - just goes to show how successful the Catholic Church was back in the day in constructing the paradigm used by the populace: "for Christian, read Catholic". Which folks obviously still do.
Well firstly, this is Ireland and the vast majority of Christians in Ireland are Catholics so clearly if I'm discussing the damage done by Christianity it will mainly involve discussing the damage done by Catholicism. If you were arguing against somebody in Germany who advocated the adoption of fascism, you'd hardly spend half your point discussing the evils of Franco's regime. Secondly, are you suggesting that non-Catholics don't persecute minorities in the same way, and don't seek to deprive people of their human rights in the same way? Thirdly, the Catholic Church was the only game in town in Western Europe until the 16th century, so you can't blame anyone else for everything before that. And fourthly, in suggesting that because I focus on Catholic crimes in a predominantly Catholic country I'm unaware that other Catholic denomination exist is not only logically absurd, but ridiculous when you consider the person posting it is from a country characterised by ethnic violence between Christian denominations for much of the last hundred years.
 


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