• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please contact us.

The Graveyard of US Military planes.... Iceland

cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,023
Brilliant article, well worth a read.
?Iceland?s Ghost Fleet | Motherboard

According to public military records from the Air Force and Navy, from 1941 to 1973...., there were 385 US military aviation accidents in Iceland. That’s roughly one accident every 31 days for 33 straight years. Considering that we have never waged war with Iceland, that no country has attacked Iceland in the last 70 years, and that this far-flung island nation doesn’t even have a military, that’s insane.
 


de valera's' giddy goat

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 22, 2011
Messages
2,049
Interesting article, it is a country definitely on my list to visit
 

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
Brilliant article, well worth a read.
?Iceland?s Ghost Fleet | Motherboard



That's a great OP and a very interesting link to read, thanks for posting it.

Yanks used to have a huge military base in Keflavik in Iceland.
I visited that site over 10 years ago when I was in Reykjavik, to see someone. The security at Keflavik was something else.
 

Franzoni

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 3, 2010
Messages
16,328
First thing is thought of when i saw the OP was Sigur Ros......and then i read the article....:)

Great OP Cozzy.....
 

cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,023
I liked the aspect that the military would sometimes have to rely on local search & rescue to help out.
he US Navy received the plane’s mayday call and immediately contacted ICE-SAR, Iceland’s nationwide system of emergency search and rescue volunteers. Based on the plane’s speed and height, the dispatcher estimated that the aircraft would land somewhere between the Mýrdalsjökull glacier and the sea. He looked for the closest local unit, and called its commander, Reynir Ragnarsson. Within a few minutes, Reynir had mobilized the team from Vík and headed out in a super Jeep to hunt for the plane.

The team arrived at the crash site just as the survivors were being airlifted away by the rescue helicopter. Still, as the military stripped the plane, they gladly gave the rescue unit the 800 liters of gasoline that remained in the its tanks. It was enough fuel to power the team’s snowmobiles for several years afterward, and the Navy knew it was only a matter of time before they’d need to call on the men again.
 

cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,023
Nice post.

Now can we reflect on how the US military make a habit of such things. The radioactive pollution and the missing nuke core near the Thule air base in Greenland, anyone?

But the sheer joy of anything Icelandic is observing a writer's panic when she/he has to hunt down the eths (Ð/đ) and thorns (Ƿ/ƿ) hidden in alternative keyboards.
Probably best addressed in a thread of it's own, it's certainly worthy especially when added to a similar case that happened in spain during the 1960's.


I'd like to reflect on how the US Military were still using a DC3 type aeroplanes into the 1970's!
 
Last edited:

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
3,968
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
Did I miss the link to the YouTube clip about this wreck? —

[video=youtube;Uqu8gN12IvU]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uqu8gN12IvU[/video]​

cozzy121 is correct to reflect on how the US Military were still using a DC3 type aeroplanes into the 1970's. The last C-117 in US Navy service was retired to the "Boneyard", Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, on 12th July 1976:



Even so, the Sólheimasandur aircraft was one of the R4D-8 Super DC-3 remanufactures from the early 1950s. Douglas were obviously mistaken in trying to market an "improved" rebuild of a 1935 design: I think only a few dozen were sold, and almost all of those to the military. On the other hand, what killed the remanufacture was the survival of so many second-hand DC3s. In the early 1950s the cost of a "modern" replacement was about half-a-million bucks: a "remanufactured" Super DC3 about half that amount, but a ex-military, not "remanufactured", war-surplus a small fraction of that.

Buffalo Airways, in the Canadian North-West Territories, seems still to be be flying DC3s between its Hay River base and Yellowknife.
 

cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,023
Did I miss the link to the YouTube clip about this wreck?..........Buffalo Airways, in the Canadian North-West Territories, seems still to be be flying DC3s between its Hay River base and Yellowknife.
There's a great PBS documentary on You Tube about the Dam busters where they reenact a bouncing bomb drop on a purpose built dam in Canada. The Flyer they use is the Buffalo Airways boss!
 
Last edited:


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top