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The Irish Eagle poisoning season has arrived

Ecoguy

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Eagle plans threatened by poisonings - The Irish Times - Tue, Mar 02, 2010

Sad but inevitable given that it appears a small number of sheep farmers in the West of Ireland(despite being heavily subsidized by Irish and EU taxpayers via REPS and other farm payments) have apparently decided through ignorance/carelessness to go about wiping out some of our most magnificent and enigmatic wildlife from our skies. All the more tragic in that this was the first Irish born Eagle for nearly 100 years and was attracting alot of attention with visitors coming to catch a glimpse of Conall in the beautifull setting of the Ben Bulbens. Reading the article it really is amazing how how this kind of thing is still allowed in a so-called modern Western country with a Green Party in government:rolleyes:
 


borntorum

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Totally agree, instead of getting worked up about stag hunting, the Greens should be worrying about this appalling slaughter of these beautiful birds. Shameful stuff
 

charley

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the poisioned bait would have been intended for foxes,its lambing season the bird was collateral damage ,these things happen
 

hmmm

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That is so sad :( We have huge opportunities in this country to develop a major outdoor tourism industry like Scotland and parts of Wales have managed, but a small (tiny) group of people are being allowed to block it. It was the same with hillwalking where the potential industry was destroyed by a few malcontents, I hope it isn't the same with these animals.
 

maxthedog

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the poisioned bait would have been intended for foxes,its lambing season the bird was collateral damage ,these things happen
As the farmers are heavily subsibised and re-imbursed for losses, killing the Eagle is inexcusable.

Its a great loss for the tourist industry.

That one bird flying high in the sky could have dragged in hundreds of thousand Euro.

Just look at what Fungi did for Dingle.

A real pity, but a true reflection of the Ireland of today.

Worried about a few lambs costing a couple of thousand and killing of a whole industry employing hundreds.
 

Ecoguy

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the poisioned bait would have been intended for foxes,its lambing season the bird was collateral damage ,these things happen
Not good enough - this indiscriminate use of these uncovered poison bait have been banned in nearly all European countries for the very fact that it kills huge numbers of non-target species. There is plenty of other safer ways to protect flocks which in any case if properly looked after should not be giving birth on remote mountainsides in wintry weather which is by far the leading cause of lamb losses.
 
H

Heorditas

Just watching it on the news now. Awfully depressing. :(



What a beautiful creature.
 

Ecoguy

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Just watching it on the news now. Awfully depressing. :(



What a beautiful creature.
Yep - given the rate of this type of carnage over the last 5 years it appears that neither the Gold Eagle project in Donegal or the Sea-Eagle project in Kerry have much chance of success in Ireland at the start of the 21st century - obviously the authorities have decided we don't need the revenue from Ecotourism that these magnificent birds bring in as is the case in Scotland were fishermen now make more money bringing tourists to see the sea-eagles hunting and nesting then they do from fishing.:rolleyes:
 

Ecoguy

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these eagles were introduced unnaturally so this is no surpise to me
:confused: - eagles were returned to places like Western Scotland over the last 3 decades and are now well established and thriving

The Golden Eagle is a native species that was wiped out by human ignorance in the early 20th century - sad that we obviously haven't progressed since then:(
 

maxthedog

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these eagles were introduced unnaturally so this is no surpise to me
That thick Donegal farmers are killing of a source of income that involves work.

Prefering to draw the dole and live like parasites off the rest of us.
 

Ecoguy

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That thick Donegal farmers are killing of a source of income that involves work.

Prefering to draw the dole and live like parasites off the rest of us.
To be fair Max its a handfull of farmers, but the damage that they can do is massive - indeed its about time the government get the finger out on this and bring in laws which not only ban this activity but remove single farm payments from those that continue to engage in it!!
 

MsAnneThrope

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Sickening, irresponsible and moronic behaviour. On March 3rd 2009 (a year to the day tomorrow!) there was a thread here: Gardaí To Investigate Eagle Poisoning In Donegal

Don't laugh but did anything ever come of that investigation? There were allegations I heard that it was known locally (or strongly suspected) who was responsible :roll:
 

maxthedog

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To be fair Max its a handfull of farmers, but the damage that they can do is massive - indeed its about time the government get the finger out on this and bring in laws which not only ban this activity but remove single farm payments from those that continue to engage in it!!
I saw the same thing happen to a lovely Salmon stream in Feoghnach, outside Dingle, 30 years ago.

A lot of people running B&Bs for fishermen, who would spend hundreds of pounds just to catch a Salmon.

But you had the lads with the nets and they killed of the fish, for the sake of a couple of pints from the chef in the local hotels.

And of course the Fishermen stopped coming and an industry dried up

it really is a small group, but they would grudge anyone making an honest living from eco-tourism
 

Ecoguy

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Sickening, irresponsible and moronic behaviour. On March 3rd 2009 (a year to the day tomorrow!) there was a thread here: Gardaí To Investigate Eagle Poisoning In Donegal

Don't laugh but did anything ever come of that investigation? There were allegations I heard that it was known locally (or strongly suspected) who was responsible :roll:
The sad irony is that the Golden Eagle is very much the farmers friend since Conall as a chick was fed by his parents, among other things, fox cubs and crows:(
 

jtbooker

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Moronic, sickening, short-sighted...someone should complain to the local TD Mary Coughl...oh wait

A sad sad indictment how a few twits can destroy both an industry and a wonderful opportunity to bring back something beautiful...
 

MsAnneThrope

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There is plenty of other safer ways to protect flocks which in any case if properly looked after should not be giving birth on remote mountainsides in wintry weather which is by far the leading cause of lamb losses.
+1 Especially with the winter we've just had - the coldest since the 1960s. I saw harrowing scenes on RTE news a couple of weeks ago of dead, frozen sheep. Hundreds, if not thousands, died nationwide having been left outside in remote areas. And the gobsh1te(s) who is killing the eagles every year is only concerned with the eagles, and not the weather?
 

MsAnneThrope

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Golden Eagle Trust, January 28th 2010: Fears over Springtime Poisoning Incidents

In 2009, 1 Golden Eagle, 1 White-tailed Eagle and 1 Red Kite were found poisoned, with three different toxins in 3 separate provinces during the springtime [...]

The Irish Government repeatedly promised at the time, that a legislative change would be introduced all but banning the use of poisoned meat baits, outside exceptional licensed exemptions. This small legislative compromise, still allowing for the use of non-meat baits according to the existing poisoning regulations, has still not been introduced.

Now almost twelve months later and nothing has changed since last year.

The GET [Golden Eagle Trust] has lobbied for more than 10 years for simple changes to the Irish poisoning legislation and though some alterations have been made, people are still allowed to use meat baits under certain conditions. [...]

However, even these few simple conditions are not being adhered to and the use of poison continues with dire consequences for wildlife, farm dogs, pets, and potentially human health. The GET submitted a formal complaint to the EU Commission, in December 2009, contending that the Irish Government are in breach of the 1979 European Union Birds Directive. Primarily, the current legislation in Ireland permits Foxes to be poisoned with meat baits (and crows and Magpies with non-meat baits), without adequate safeguards to prevent the inevitable poisoning of birds of prey (including Annex 1 species). This is in contravention of Articles 4 and 9 of the Birds Directive, because clear alternative and discriminate control measures are available. In addition, the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food fails to ensure that farmers, who are in receipt of direct payments (Single Farm Payment and Rural Environmental Protection Scheme) under the EU Common Agricultural Policy, comply with the Cross Compliance Policy and that they duly implement the Statutory Management Requirements in respect of the obligation not to harm Annex 1 birds of prey (which are protected under the Birds Directive) [...]

Lorcán O' Toole of the Golden Eagle Trust, said, "We have been writing to different individuals, at different levels within the relevant Government Departments for over 10 years now, requesting simple legislative changes that will not discommode any person using poison in a responsible manner. But despite continued promises and genuine aspirations within the Statutory Authorities it appears as if some unidentified issue or bureaucratic problem is stymieing the push for legislative change."
And we've had a 'green' Minister for the Environment since June 2007 :mad:
 

MsAnneThrope

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Is this poison used on the sheep for something else, and eagles can die if they get in contact with it, or is it actually put on to kill eagles? If so its pretty sick.
According to the Golden Eagle Trust:

A post mortem carried out by the Regional Veterinary Laboratory in Rathcormack, Sligo revealed that the young male was in excellent condition prior to its death. Toxicology analysis, carried out at the Ashtown Food Research Centre, Dublin 15 prove that the eagle was poisoned by Nitroxynil poured over the fleece of a dead newborn or aborted lamb. Nitroxynil is found in Throdax, which is a veterinary medicine used to treat liver fluke in livestock. New born lambs are not treated for liver fluke. Initial surveillance suggests that no local farmer has any new born lambs outdoors at present. Gardaí in Sligo Town have begun their investigation.
 


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