The Knives are out as Steak is back on the menu



SuirView

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Is this a secret weapon for poor "P O'Neill" when he posted that SF will soon win 75+ seats in the 26?
Why do the SF'ers on this site run away from poor "P O'Neill"s prediction?
 

Ardillaun

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now
Very true, they brits used divide and conquer tactics through out their empire....they were good at that....They bought the weak minded and the greedy and used them as cannon fodder to keep their empire intact.....It would be interesting to know who the bought in the security forces south of the border to ensure safe passage for the Dublin and Monaghan bombers.. Without doubt they had spy's and informers in the IRA and Irish political parties throughout the most recent conflict as they had in all conflicts involving the fight for Irish freedom.....Opening up the files wont happen now just as it didn't happen in the 1920's....It is my opinion that others rather than SF/IRA would be most worried...
Information will gradually leak out. There are always people with axes to grind e.g. former handlers and active service members who had suspicions. The picture will become clearer as independent evidence accumulates. All sides should be worried.
 

comet

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There is more chance of me winning Euromillions than Scap. appearing in court. Giving him the " bully pulpit " of the witness box won`t be on his handlers plans. The closer he gets to a judge and jury is the closer he gets to - well now who could`ve seen that heart attack coming.
 

edwin

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There is more chance of me winning Euromillions than Scap. appearing in court. Giving him the " bully pulpit " of the witness box won`t be on his handlers plans. The closer he gets to a judge and jury is the closer he gets to - well now who could`ve seen that heart attack coming.
Absolutely. MI5 and SF on the same side - who'd have thought it?? :)
 

McTell

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No
One of the things that gets me about the " Brits ran the IRA " conspiracy theorists, is that when they are accused of running the loyalists to commit atrocities the same crowd will deny it ever happened.

Not at all, the ra and the uda and M15 all share one demographic, what our american cousins call "white trash".

Birds of a feather and all that.

From my perch in the midlands, the ra and uda share that same urban working-class-that-didn't-work / uk social security / superstitious / victimhood / "we wuz robbed" /pub culture / drug dealing philosophy.

Before trying to unite ireland, SF might like to unite the social security class in Belfast, and show the rest of us how it's done....
 

PBP voter

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The IRA didn't know about them but you did petunia
The PIRA knew they existed. They just couldn't find out who they were.

Adams driver was an informer for years and he didn't know.

Informers are a huge part of Gardai operations.

It only takes one informer to help out a huge amount.

Why was the South Prisons full of PIRA?
 

NMunsterman

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The PIRA knew they existed. They just couldn't find out who they were.

Adams driver was an informer for years and he didn't know.

Informers are a huge part of Gardai operations.

It only takes one informer to help out a huge amount.

Why was the South Prisons full of PIRA?
We are led to believe by the Sgt. Harpers and other Walter Mitty types that the MI5 ran the IRA - thus, the Baltic Exchange and Canary Wharf were inside jobs.

So, da Brits were running Brit agents to bomb da Brits in order to protect Brit agents who were negotiating with da Brits.
But da Brits at the other side of the table did not know they were dealing with Brits all the time.

Fuggin' genius.
 

JimmyFoley

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Just as an aside:

Can someone explain the spelling of "stake knife" (the most usual spelling in the print media)?

Shouldn't it be "steak knife"?

What on earth is a "stake knife" anyway?
It was originally 'steak'. Can't recall why or when it changed to 'stake', but I don't think there was any deliberate decision taken to change it; it's just one of those vagaries of language usage. A bit like the way that 'spending' has become 'spend'!
 

cricket

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We are led to believe by the Sgt. Harpers and other Walter Mitty types that the MI5 ran the IRA - thus, the Baltic Exchange and Canary Wharf were inside jobs.

So, da Brits were running Brit agents to bomb da Brits in order to protect Brit agents who were negotiating with da Brits.
But da Brits at the other side of the table did not know they were dealing with Brits all the time.

Fuggin' genius.
That might seem incredible, but could be near enough to the truth. I remember reading years ago ( can't remember where but it might have been Magill ) that the provos became so worried about informers that most units operated almost independently, with few knowing the full picture.


IRA chief 'protected after being exposed as informer' - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk
 

hollandia

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It was originally 'steak'. Can't recall why or when it changed to 'stake', but I don't think there was any deliberate decision taken to change it; it's just one of those vagaries of language usage. A bit like the way that 'spending' has become 'spend'!
It's spelled stake as that's the handle given to him by British intelligence. It might be a play on words - as in "we have a stake in the IRA", it may refer to something we don't know about, or it may be a simple misspelling when his handle was assigned. Who knows, outside of UK intelligence?
 

hollandia

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JimmyFoley

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It's spelled stake as that's the handle given to him by British intelligence. It might be a play on words - as in "we have a stake in the IRA", it may refer to something we don't know about, or it may be a simple misspelling when his handle was assigned. Who knows, outside of UK intelligence?
But the Brits originally referred to him as 'steak'. The change to 'stake' was, iirc, just a mistake that was repeated so often it became the norm. A bit like DB Cooper.
 

Toland

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It was originally 'steak'. Can't recall why or when it changed to 'stake', but I don't think there was any deliberate decision taken to change it; it's just one of those vagaries of language usage. A bit like the way that 'spending' has become 'spend'!
So it's exactly what I feared: a fossilised mistake.
 

cricket

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Cricket, the IRA switched to a cell structure in the seventies. That's old news.
The article I'm talking about was way later than the 70's and referred to a change following a major setback for the provos, might have been Loughgall or an arms find.
 

hollandia

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The article I'm talking about was way later than the 70's and referred to a change following a major setback for the provos, might have been Loughgall or an arms find.
Nonetheless, the cell structure began in the seventies, for the very reasons you outlined. You may be referring to some other structural change.
 

hollandia

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So it's exactly what I feared: a fossilised mistake.
Liam Clarke, the Sunday Times Northern Ireland editor, who first broke the story four years ago of the existence of an Army agent called "Steak Knife", did not identify him as Scappaticci on Sunday. He still believed the story was true.
Others remain wary. Peter Taylor said: "I've been watching this story unravel with interest. To be honest, we still don't even know whether he's actually called 'Stakeknife' or 'Steak knife'. There's a lot more to come out about this."
What is the truth behind the story of Stakeknife? - Telegraph

From 2003, it notes that Liam Clarke broke the story, or alluded to a "Steak Knife" in 1999. Now, if you're told "his name is Stakeknife" by a source, you're going to write down "Steak knife" in the absence of any documentation. I believe "stakeknife" to be the actual handle, based on the amount of repetition, and the usage in media sources which would be close to British Intelligence. But at the end of the day, it'll only be cleared up by documentation - i.e. never.
 

Toland

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It's spelled stake as that's the handle given to him by British intelligence. It might be a play on words - as in "we have a stake in the IRA", it may refer to something we don't know about, or it may be a simple misspelling when his handle was assigned. Who knows, outside of UK intelligence?
Ah! The illiteracy of intelligence.
 


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