The Last Days of Labour?

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
55,055
An interesting article by Jason Cowley in the New Statesman on the slow death of the Labour party under Corbyn:

The stench of decay and failure coming from the Labour Party is now overwhelming

Cowley points out that a key driver behind the SNP's campaign for a second referendum is the belief, shared by most lab MPs, that the Tories will be in power to at least 2030. Meanwhile, Jezza's fans in the media are abandoning him, Philip Hammond describes the last Labour government as the 'last' Labour government, and the government is relaxed in the knowledge that no matter how much they screw up, there is no opposition to call them to account.

So, with the party split down the middle, can Labour even survive to 2030? It looks unlikely, I'm afraid.
 


Strawberry

Moderator
Joined
Jul 13, 2014
Messages
16,294
They could survive if they changed their leader but I think they'll have to suffer defeat at a general election for that to happen.
 

constitutionus

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
23,265
I thought there was a bus crash involving our lot when I read the title .

:D
 

locke

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2007
Messages
3,173
I can imagine Tory support significantly failing over the next 5 years, so I'm not sure about them being in power until 2030. However, under the current leadership, it's not going to Labour.

Where Tory support will go is another question. UKIP are in decline and don't really have a platform. The Lib Dems have the potential to pick up some pro-Europe middle-class Tories, but not huge numbers. It may just become voters being disillusioned and not voting.
 

razorblade

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2016
Messages
8,081
As long as corbyn stays on as leader they will continue to deteriorate future.
 

A Voice

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
7,415
McCluskey of Unite (a key Corbyn backer) said pretty much that he was giving Jezza till June 2018 to turn things around. So it'll probably be bye-bye Jezza then. Labour will still lose the following election unless a sensational leader emerges. Hard to see such a candidate on the horizon.
 

Henry94.

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Messages
1,925
I thought there was a bus crash involving our lot when I read the title .

:D
Our crowd show that the answer doesn't lie in the centre either. There is no easy fix for the mainstream left. What can they offer us? Identity issues are embraced by every party once they become popular. The left appears to stand for the public sector and little else.
 

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
55,055
I can imagine Tory support significantly failing over the next 5 years, so I'm not sure about them being in power until 2030. However, under the current leadership, it's not going to Labour.

Where Tory support will go is another question. UKIP are in decline and don't really have a platform. The Lib Dems have the potential to pick up some pro-Europe middle-class Tories, but not huge numbers. It may just become voters being disillusioned and not voting.
I can see the Tory vote falling, but the Labour vote collapsing, keeping the Tories in power by default.
 

Se0samh

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
16,079
I can imagine Tory support significantly failing over the next 5 years, so I'm not sure about them being in power until 2030. However, under the current leadership, it's not going to Labour.

Where Tory support will go is another question. UKIP are in decline and don't really have a platform. The Lib Dems have the potential to pick up some pro-Europe middle-class Tories, but not huge numbers. It may just become voters being disillusioned and not voting.
They won't.........the Tories are a disaster, as is slowly becoming clear.................Labour will regain most of that shift......under whatever leadership.......Corbyn will go when it suits......he's not personally ambitious.............:)
 

Hunter-Gatherer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2014
Messages
1,488
tony blair and gordon brown. Bombing Iraq for nothing. Opening the floodgates of immigration for votes.

doomed labour to the wilderness among the working classes.
 

rainmaker

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2012
Messages
22,637
tony blair and gordon brown. Bombing Iraq for nothing. Opening the floodgates of immigration for votes.

doomed labour to the wilderness among the working classes.
And still Labour won general elections even after all that, one of them with a landslide. In fact they only narrowly lost in 2010 and the Tories and the Libems had to form an awkward coalition to remove them.

I'm afraid the analysis will have to run a little a deeper & closer to home for Labour than blaming immigrants and wars.

The party veered slightly left under Ed, who was only elected thanks to the union block vote - under Corbyn it has become rudderless, while he studies a map he's holding upside down while ignoring warnings from the crew.

The Tories were left to plant their flag unchallenged in the middle ground and they did so effectively.
 

im axeled

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 24, 2010
Messages
29,289
Our crowd show that the answer doesn't lie in the centre either. There is no easy fix for the mainstream left. What can they offer us? Identity issues are embraced by every party once they become popular. The left appears to stand for the public sector and little else.
or in our case very big buisness
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
23,973
I doubt 'Labour' as a brand will disappear but it may well have to implode and then re-invent itself at some stage if it's to be in any way relevant.

Currently it has manoeuvered itself into total irrelevance and even Corbynites will get tired and jaded with that over time.

The British public will get tired of the Tories too... I think the limit is about 10 years before people start thinking a change is as good as a rest... if only to have some fresh faces around...

It happened with the eFFing traitors here and with Labour in the UK... so 2030 is probably pushing it...

The Germans seem remarkably immune from such a need however... but there you go.

I think the Lib Dems will make a comeback of sorts in the meantime.
 

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
55,055
I doubt 'Labour' as a brand will disappear but it may well have to implode and then re-invent itself at some stage if it's to be in any way relevant.

Currently it has manoeuvered itself into total irrelevance and even Corbynites will get tired and jaded with that over time.

The British public will get tired of the Tories too... I think the boundary is about 10 years and then people start thinking a change is as good as a rest... if only to have some fresh faces around...

It happened with the eFFing traitors here and with Labour in the UK...

The Germans seem remarkably immune from such a need however... but there you go.

I think the Lib Dems will make a comeback of sorts in the meantime.
If you read the link, the question at its heart is 'who will speak for liberal Britain?'
The Lib Dems does seem like the obvious answer.
 

Se0samh

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
16,079
They won't.........the Tories are a disaster, as is slowly becoming clear.................Labour will regain most of that shift......under whatever leadership.......Corbyn will go when it suits......he's not personally ambitious.............:)

I see that I'm the only one predicting a Labour recovery....................well you heard it here first folks, hold me to it at the appropriate time........................that is if this place is still here then.....................;)
 

locke

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2007
Messages
3,173
I think the Lib Dems will make a comeback of sorts in the meantime.
That does seem the danger to them.

If they can win back the Social Democrat voters who abandoned them after the coalition Government. Then they are in the high teens and Labour in the low Twenties. Add some pro-European Tories and suddenly Labour and the Lib Dems are on very similar figures.

Most vulnerable in those circumstances would be middle-class, urban constituencies, although if they did lose that block of voters, it could enable them to refocus on getting working-class votes back from UKIP.
 

farnaby

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2006
Messages
1,930
Our crowd show that the answer doesn't lie in the centre either. There is no easy fix for the mainstream left. What can they offer us? Identity issues are embraced by every party once they become popular. The left appears to stand for the public sector and little else.
British Labour had their chance with the Brexit referendum and bottled it. A year ago the Tories were divided over Europe and that could have been exploited but Corbyn, with his anti-EU past, could not commit to Remain.

He and his fellow idealogues anyway lack organisational capability beyond setting up a PA system at a student protest so even when they supported Remain it failed to connect with swaying voters.

"Social progress"/identity politics are not a policy platform, they are the crumbs from the table left-wing parties are given while the centre/right wing fiercely defends capitalist economics.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top