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The layman's guide to the size of the Universe


Hewson

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For those who have a passing interest in astronomy this short video puts our place in the grand scheme of things astronomical in perspective.

When you look up at the night sky it's fascinating to remember that you're a time traveller, as well as a paid-up citizen of that great expanse of time, space and mystery that is, in every sense, your home.


[video]http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2013/feb/11/how-big-universe-sand-video1?INTCMP=SRCH[/video]
 

ruserious

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Just goes to show that there must be other life out there.

I'm also interested on the odds of us individually existing at all when you take in all the butterfly effects down through the generations.
 

Hewson

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Just goes to show that there must be other life out there.

I'm also interested on the odds of us individually existing at all when you take in all the butterfly effects down through the generations.
The chances of this little speck in space being the only inhabited world are insignificant. The Universe is, in all likelihood, teeming with life.

We're hoping to find evidence of some kind of primitive lifeform, even extinct ones, on Mars via the Mars Rover. Imagine the repercussions if we do.
 
L

longshortgrass

The chances of this little speck in space being the only inhabited world are insignificant. The Universe is, in all likelihood, teeming with life.

We're hoping to find evidence of some kind of primitive lifeform, even extinct ones, on Mars via the Mars Rover. Imagine the repercussions if we do.

The moons of Jupiter probably are the only candidates in our lifetime for live life, particularly in the seas of Europa....
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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The chances of this little speck in space being the only inhabited world are insignificant. The Universe is, in all likelihood, teeming with life.

We're hoping to find evidence of some kind of primitive lifeform, even extinct ones, on Mars via the Mars Rover. Imagine the repercussions if we do.
Considering we still haven't found Shergar, I don't fancy our chances
 

Hewson

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The moons of Jupiter probably are the only candidates in our lifetime for live life, particularly in the seas of Europa....
Hmmm. Jupiter is a strange planet. Dozens of moons, but Europa, as you rightly point out is the one with the most life-potential.


Europa, closer to Jupiter than Ganymede, is the smoothest natural body in the solar system. It resembles a billiard ball until seen very close-up. At that distance you can start to see dark, deep, and narrow cracks. In scale, though, the relief is no bigger than a line on a billiard ball made with a felt-tipped marker. Geologists think that Europa has liquid water underneath the icy surface - and possibly life.
 

Hewson

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Considering we still haven't found Shergar, I don't fancy our chances
I'm still hoping that they'll have left home already and are on the way here. :shock:

Mind you, depending on where they might land, the visit could be very brief.
 

ShankillFalls

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I notice that on this discussion of the possible existance of alien lifeform I got an ad for Lucinda Creighton TD.

Coincidence? I think not!
 
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The chances of this little speck in space being the only inhabited world are insignificant. The Universe is, in all likelihood, teeming with life.

We're hoping to find evidence of some kind of primitive lifeform, even extinct ones, on Mars via the Mars Rover. Imagine the repercussions if we do.
The current machine cannot detect life on Mars. All it can do is determine whether the conditions for life once existed.

That's to be the focus of a future mission.
 

H.R. Haldeman

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The chances of this little speck in space being the only inhabited world are insignificant. The Universe is, in all likelihood, teeming with life.

We're hoping to find evidence of some kind of primitive lifeform, even extinct ones, on Mars via the Mars Rover. Imagine the repercussions if we do.

I think it was Karl Sagan who said that one of two things must be true - either we're alone in the Universe, or we're not, and it's hard to say which of those two scenarios would be more mind-blowing.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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I'm still hoping that they'll have left home already and are on the way here. :shock:

Mind you, depending on where they might land, the visit could be very brief.
Has anybody examined the Healy-Raes? The assumption that they are human seems a big leap.
 

Hewson

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I think it was Karl Sagan who said that one of two things must be true - either we're alone in the Universe, or we're not, and it's hard to say which of those two scenarios would be more mind-blowing.
It would be the former for me. A bit like waking up one day to find yourself alone in the world. Literally.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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The current machine cannot detect life on Mars. All it can do is determine whether the conditions for life once existed.

That's to be the focus of a future mission.
Des, you've highlighted something which really grinds my gears!

Why do we, as earthlings, presume to know what conditions life needs to exist? Why do we assume life needs water? I've heard Brian Cox (I think that's his name) saying there can be no life without traces of water, and that smacks of arrogance, or lack of thinking, to me.

Glad that's off my chest :)
 

Hewson

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Has anybody examined the Healy-Raes? The assumption that they are human seems a big leap.
Strangely enough, or not, my first thought when I wrote that post was what the reaction of potential visitors would be if Jackie was to be asked for directions.

'Yerra, Jasus, lads, ye don't want to be shtartin' from here at all at all . . .'
 
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