The maddness of govs new urban development plan

theObserver@hotmail.com

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Simon Coveney T.D., Minister for Housing has announced plans to fast track 30,000 new homes over the next 3-4 years. Most of the development will take place in Dublin.

Obviously Dublin needs development and housing, but the government have opted to further destroy our countryside by covering scenic areas with rushed and sprawling housing estates. In particular the Shanganagh-Woodbrook park area in Shankill, one of the finest parks in the country IMO, is to be turned into a concrete slab for 2,300 new homes. Cherrywood, another area badly already ruined, is so get 8000 new homes which will to led to massive traffic congestion along the already struggling N11.

I get so frustrated when the government destroys yet more of our beautiful country side. Yes we need housing but it's overwhelming obvious Dublin city needs to build up, not out. We need 20 - 30 story buildings in the city center for young 'professionals' and scenic areas around the suburbs for families.

Mr. Simon Coveney T.D., Minister for Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government, today (10th November) announced fast-track delivery arrangements for 30,000 new homes in major urban centres in Dublin, Cork and other urban locations around the country. The Minister was speaking at the launch of Pillar 3 - Building More Homes – under the Government’s “Rebuilding Ireland – an Action Plan for Housing and Homelessness.”

The Minister added, “If we are to achieve two of the core objectives of the Action Plan – increasing supply to a minimum of 25,000 homes per annum and providing the 47,000 social homes committed to, we must speed up the processes that lead to housing delivery and we must make it more efficient to deliver the homes that people need and where they need them. For my part, I have made a number of changes to the planning system to speed up the processes and reduce building costs, with more coming under fast-track planning legislation published this week and I have made funding available under Local Infrastructure Housing Activation Fund (€200m) and in Rebuilding Ireland I have set out a series of actions to ensure the restoration of a functioning housing supply system. Today is a very good start by identifying the sites with the greatest potential for development and both I and the Government now want to see developers getting on with building the homes that people need.”
Coveney announces plans to fast-track delivery of 30,000 homes | Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government
 


ShoutingIsLeadership

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The road network is already full beyond capacity at most times of the day, between Bray, Shankill and Cherrywood.

That's also a lovely park, as you have mentioned, and forms a lovely natural border between Dublin and Wicklow
 

theObserver@hotmail.com

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The road network is already full beyond capacity at most times of the day, between Bray, Shankill and Cherrywood.

That's also a lovely park, as you have mentioned, and forms a lovely natural border between Dublin and Wicklow
I think most of the housing is going in the grounds around the old castle in Shankill beside the main park. But that area has community grounds and allotments and overlaps with the main park so both will be affected. So frustrating.
 

ger12

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Why don't they build up? Who's objecting to it?
 

locke

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I saw a good point made on this recently that even if we accept that families want to live in three and four bedroom suburban houses, a lot of that stock is currently occupied by single people house-sharing. These are people who don't necessarily want to live in those houses. It also places a burden on local amenities (especially parking), which weren't designed to accommodate that number of adults.

Building apartments can free up suburban houses, if it can provide the opportunity for people who don't want to live in suburban houses to get out of those house shares.
 

Sister Mercedes

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I saw a good point made on this recently that even if we accept that families want to live in three and four bedroom suburban houses, a lot of that stock is currently occupied by single people house-sharing. These are people who don't necessarily want to live in those houses. It also places a burden on local amenities (especially parking), which weren't designed to accommodate that number of adults.

Building apartments can free up suburban houses, if it can provide the opportunity for people who don't want to live in suburban houses to get out of those house shares.
Agree. Young professionals value access to work and amenities higher than having a couple of spare bedrooms and a garden they only look out at. While my neighborhood is full of elderly widows who'd love to downsize from a 3/4 bedroom house, but there's no suitable accommodation.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Our urban planning is dictated by country mucksavages brought up on a diet of one off bungalows, and heritage types who don't want plebs interfering with their rosy-eyed views of decrepit, lifeless and derelict Georgian Dublin.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Dublin's situation beside mountains, beside the sea and with a huge enclosed park in the north west side all gives great opportunities for fantastic views from higher rise apartments.

There is not a single square inch of this city that UNESCO recognises as a heritage site, yet our planners seem to think that it is all too precious to disturb.
 

Spanner Island

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Hey!

This is Ireland... you know... the place where lessons are never learned and people keep indulging those who never learn lessons...

Urban sprawl... brilliant... exactly what we need... it's not like we've done it before and it wasn't a massive f*** up... :roll:

Green belt... f*** it... who needs it? This is Ireland... plenty of green somewhere... 40 shades of it and more... somewhere...

We need front and back gardens too... coz we ain't livin' in no skyscraper yokes... even if the suburbia obsession means concreting over eveything coz that's how we roll...

High rise in the city centre for all those young professionals...

I've been saying it for years... although it's probable that by the time the f***wits who control development and planning give the go ahead for that all the jobs will be going or gone courtesy of Brexit, Trump and the EU targeting the economic policies that for better or worse, are the foundation of our economic policy and have been for decades now...
 

wombat

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I get so frustrated when the government destroys yet more of our beautiful country side. Yes we need housing but it's overwhelming obvious Dublin city needs to build up, not out. We need 20 - 30 story buildings in the city center for young 'professionals' and scenic areas around the suburbs for families.
Get off your ar5e, start talking to people, convince them that you have a better solution and when the local elections happen, put your name on the ballot and get elected. If you are convincing enough, you may even help get like minded people elected to support your plans.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Get off your ar5e, start talking to people, convince them that you have a better solution and when the local elections happen, put your name on the ballot and get elected. If you are convincing enough, you may even help get like minded people elected to support your plans.
Unfortunately people don't care about the housing crisis as much as they care about protecting their own house prices.
 

GDPR

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When the lands in question are proposed to be zoned for housing or whatever it may be, then that's the time to be making a fuss, getting your point across and convincing others. When the thing is zoned, the horse has bolted. Just saying.
 

wombat

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To be honest, a lot of the land being used for housing in the Dun Laoghaire was only fit for rearing sheep, it makes a lot more sense to me to build in the Dublin foothills than on the plains of Meath.
 

theObserver@hotmail.com

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Why don't they build up? Who's objecting to it?
Dublin council for one. They say it will ruin the aesthetics of the city and overshadow existing low rise buildings.

Last August the council voted to limit building size to seven stories in the inner city (around 28 meters) and just 14 in the suburbs. And that's actually an increase ! Previously the limit was just 19 meters or around six stories for the inner city.

Last May councillors voted to limit the height of apartments in low-rise areas of the inner city to 24 metres and to 13m in low-rise areas of the suburbs. Most of Dublin apart from 13 specific areas falls into the low-rise category.

Dublin City Council chief executive Owen Keegan had wanted to set 28m as the maximum height for low-rise apartments in the city centre (the same height currently permitted for office blocks) and 16m as the height for suburban apartments.

The Department of the Environment has written on behalf of Mr Coveney to the council warning that the restrictions would have a negative impact on the delivery of much-needed housing the city.

The limit of 13m, which would confine an apartment block to four storeys, was of particular concern as it would seriously undermine the viability of developing apartments, said the Department.
Dublin City Council asked to reverse apartment height limits

And of course the Green party and People Before Profit opposed the tiny increase. In other words, we have a Green party who is choosing to destroy the environment with housing instead of building up the city center !

“We’re concerned that the chief executive [Owen Keegan] is looking for fairly tall buildings and we want to bring that down a bit,” says Green Party councillor Ciarán Cuffe.

Both the People Before Profit Alliance and Cuffe’s party have made party motions that propose reducing the allowed heights of buildings.
Here is why councillors don't think taller buildings will tackle Dublin's housing crisis
 

theObserver@hotmail.com

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When the lands in question are proposed to be zoned for housing or whatever it may be, then that's the time to be making a fuss, getting your point across and convincing others. When the thing is zoned, the horse has bolted. Just saying.
Most of this was agreed and planned about eight years ago then shelved because of the recession. This is the first people like me are hearing about it.
 

GDPR

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Most of this was agreed and planned about eight years ago then shelved because of the recession. This is the first people like me are hearing about it.
Plenty of stuff in construction has been stalled for the past 8 years, the zoning or plan quite possibly remains the same, but one would have to check that out. I'm only familiar with the Cherrywood plan, and it looks to be a decent plan with Luas runnning through it. SIL has been consistent in saying that there is gridlock on the M50 in the area. Much of that traffic is coming from further south, Wicklow and Wexford. Of course we really need to grasp the nettle on upgrading, converting existing buildings in our cities and towns to meet residential and job needs.
 

theObserver@hotmail.com

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Get off your ar5e, start talking to people, convince them that you have a better solution and when the local elections happen, put your name on the ballot and get elected. If you are convincing enough, you may even help get like minded people elected to support your plans.
To paraphrase the Muslim lad, I can't even get a girl I like to have to drink with me never mind persuading the famously short sighted Irish to elect me. Plus, I would need House of Cards level of cunning to navigate the developers and the corruption.
 

wombat

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Plenty of stuff in construction has been stalled for the past 8 years, the zoning or plan quite possibly remains the same, but one would have to check that out. I'm only familiar with the Cherrywood plan, and it looks to be a decent plan with Luas runnning through it.
Cherrywood is a properly planned development, scares the sh1t out of Irish Developers as the yanks are keeping the rental part, real alternative to the buy to let scam.
 

GDPR

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Cherrywood is a properly planned development, scares the sh1t out of Irish Developers as the yanks are keeping the rental part, real alternative to the buy to let scam.
Does the buy to let scheme or scam as you say take up much of the market?
 


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