The "Millennial Question"

sic transit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,397
Interesting point. But maybe some get worked up because they have been given a lesser stake in society, and therefore have different things to occupy their minds?
It's more likely to be a skills deficit. In academic areas for instance most 3rd level institutions are forced to run courses to undo the rote learning of LC.
 


stopdoingstuff

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,407
They do have a political correctness problem though. They also seem to have little issue with sacrificing privacy, whether it is to the state or to the tech companies. They are also extremely emotional and in need of a good slap to the head on occassion. We can't pin all this on economics.
 

Armchair Activist

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
2,036
I had the pleasure of working with a couple in my last place. One young lady from England stood out particularly well. 21 years old, with her only previous substantial work experience being in mobile phone retail in the UK. She had no sense of her place in the office hierarchy, when someone showed her another way of doing something in work she got up and stormed out crying, before the poor ops manager had to go after her to be told the colleague had been condescending towards her wtf! This used to happen on a weekly basis.
I think there is a mojor shift in consumer demands going on, particuarly with the younger people.

Older generations considered a job as divine, regardless of its nature. IT could be working in a land-mine factory for heavens sake. It could have been a marketing job for a tobacco company but they accepted it and got on with it.

The younger generation today are incredibly social/politically aware. They don’t want to participate in a system that designs or makes products of little impact. If giving the chance they want to help the world and people. I think as time goes on, there will be an industrial/economic shift towards creating more products or services that litterllay make people happy. Not just materials as the older generation would have us believe. Something to be applauded in my opinion.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
49,839
It's more likely to be a skills deficit. In academic areas for instance most 3rd level institutions are forced to run courses to undo the rote learning of LC.


I spent much of my college life without the first clue of what was going on!
 

sic transit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,397
I spent much of my college life without the first clue of what was going on!
Many of us do but we eventually got the hang of it. This is about the absence of basic skills like critical thinking when they start.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
49,839
They do have a political correctness problem though. They also seem to have little issue with sacrificing privacy, whether it is to the state or to the tech companies. They are also extremely emotional and in need of a good slap to the head on occassion. We can't pin all this on economics.


Sacrificing privacy...completely agree. Nothing is private nowadays. I sometimes feel like Gene Hackman in Enemy of the State, in comparison
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
49,839
Many of us do but we eventually got the hang of it. This is about the absence of basic skills like critical thinking when they start.


Is the critical thinking problem confined to that generation? Would Bertie Ahern have been elected, a housing bubble created, if it was?
 

Armchair Activist

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
2,036
Many of us do but we eventually got the hang of it. This is about the absence of basic skills like critical thinking when they start.
They have the arrogance to call it a 'smart economy'

If anyone knows, the current standard of technology is in deep learning, artificial neural networks, Big Data analytics and the like.

The lads in goverment are still pondering around about social media.
 
Last edited:

sic transit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,397
Is the critical thinking problem confined to that generation? Would Bertie Ahern have been elected, a housing bubble created, if it was?
I'm not sure but less so in previous generations ,I suspect, on account of how kids are now taught. There have been concerns at 3rd level about the approach of LC for most of the century at least. Bertie would win any time. He's a master populist.
 

sic transit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,397
They have the arrogance to call it a 'smart economy'

If anyone knows, the current standard of technology is in deep learning, artificial neural networks, Big Data analytics and the like.

The lads in goverment are still pondering around whether or not to teach young people computer science.
Many of the CompSc graduates are quite useless and often have little knowledge of their subject. All the fancy smart economy stuff comes post-graduate.
 

stopdoingstuff

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,407
Sacrificing privacy...completely agree. Nothing is private nowadays. I sometimes feel like Gene Hackman in Enemy of the State, in comparison
I think there is just a very uncritical attitude towards authority out there, whether State or corporate.
 

Armchair Activist

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
2,036
Many of the CompSc graduates are quite useless and often have little knowledge of their subject. All the fancy smart economy stuff comes post-graduate.
meaning we're well behind.
 

sic transit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,397
meaning we're well behind.
We are going to be anyway and very dependent on FDI to get it up and running. Education cycles take 5-6 years to deliver any numbers. I'm less concerned about it TBH just as long as we are getting good quality graduates, who will be able to adapt.
 

APettigrew92

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
2,701
In terms of allowing the highly educated prosper from the economy, they've done a good job of it. At least for the techies and financers. Little has been done to adapt the education system to normal folk who cannot afford grinds, private schools or summer camps. Most people are smart if giving the chance, but the reality is that the system has failed most people..
Right you are.

If you travel to a German Secondary School (from Realschule to Gymanisum), you'd fine that many Abitur students have their hearts set on internships with car companies, electronics manufacturers and other secondary industries. I think the figure often ranges between 40%-60% depending on the class. These jobs hold a lot of prestige, too.

This is taken into account when States do up their budgets and Governments make considerations for workers rights.

In Ireland, if you mentioned that you were leaving school to do an internship as a carpenter, a sheet metal worker or a bus driver, which are as necessary if not more necessary than the likes of Gender Studies or Political Science, you would get laughed at, ridiculed and derided.

We've built an unhealthy and unrealistic culture where services are the supposed lifeblood of Ireland's economy yet Apple and the others hardly pay any tax and hire disproportionate numbers of foreign graduates.

It not only divides society along economic and cultural lines, it also ignores the reality that economies are more complex than just services. The Indo and their ************************ehawks wrote any number of baseless arguments on the "laziness" of bus drivers, clearly a shot at their supposed intellectual laziness, while they let the likes of Holly Carpenter write in their lifestyle section and Fionnan "my-wife-is-FF-and-there-are-provos-hiding-under-my-bed" Sheehan is given a carte blanche to write whatever pleases the Dark Lord of the Media.

It is a web of contradiction, hypocrisy and weakness which lauds education as the saviour of the masses yet tacitly supports the dynastic nature of employment in most areas. It is intellectual when it chooses to be and luddite and phillistine when the Old Order is truly threatened. It is used as a hammer to beat down individuals from poorer backgrounds, ones who cannot afford to swan around South East Asia for months on end and come back to a Civil Service job conjured up by their father's contacts.
 

inherit the deficit

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2009
Messages
772
What I find is it isn't the younger generation turning to the likes of Trump and Farage and LePen it is the older. The haves trying to jealously protect what they have from the have nots.
 

Plebian

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2011
Messages
9,254
They seem to be a nice bunch of people in general which is a huge improvement on many of the manner free generation that raised them. There's a spark or an edge missing from them but maybe that's not a bad thing.
 
Last edited:

Armchair Activist

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
2,036
Right you are.

If you travel to a German Secondary School (from Realschule to Gymanisum), you'd fine that many Abitur students have their hearts set on internships with car companies, electronics manufacturers and other secondary industries. I think the figure often ranges between 40%-60% depending on the class. These jobs hold a lot of prestige, too.

This is taken into account when States do up their budgets and Governments make considerations for workers rights.

In Ireland, if you mentioned that you were leaving school to do an internship as a carpenter, a sheet metal worker or a bus driver, which are as necessary if not more necessary than the likes of Gender Studies or Political Science, you would get laughed at, ridiculed and derided.

We've built an unhealthy and unrealistic culture where services are the supposed lifeblood of Ireland's economy yet Apple and the others hardly pay any tax and hire disproportionate numbers of foreign graduates.

It not only divides society along economic and cultural lines, it also ignores the reality that economies are more complex than just services. The Indo and their ************************ehawks wrote any number of baseless arguments on the "laziness" of bus drivers, clearly a shot at their supposed intellectual laziness, while they let the likes of Holly Carpenter write in their lifestyle section and Fionnan "my-wife-is-FF-and-there-are-provos-hiding-under-my-bed" Sheehan is given a carte blanche to write whatever pleases the Dark Lord of the Media.

It is a web of contradiction, hypocrisy and weakness which lauds education as the saviour of the masses yet tacitly supports the dynastic nature of employment in most areas. It is intellectual when it chooses to be and luddite and phillistine when the Old Order is truly threatened. It is used as a hammer to beat down individuals from poorer backgrounds, ones who cannot afford to swan around South East Asia for months on end and come back to a Civil Service job conjured up by their father's contacts.
So where is it going?

What we might end up with is a large segment of society rejecting the institution of work for works sake. The internet, entertainment/social media etc may well be a replacement. I think this is what the older generation are afraid of. But what about it? Society will not collapse, technology and offshoring is replacing jobs anyway. People have the right to do what they want with their time.
 

danger here

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 9, 2010
Messages
2,549
The missing spark/edge is a very bad thing in the longterm. It's not unlike the idea of teachers running the State, except imagine INTO teachers trying to jostle for power in the dog eat dog real world and then wondering why the textbooks they read do not seem to matter an iota to how the real world functions.

Put it another way, people born in the 70s and 80s understand the concept of good times/bad times and how to adjust with the prevailing winds , a millennial will not and furthermore believes that that they don't need to, their world is fine. Then 20 years later when they are up against it, they may not be able to handle the pressure.
 

toughbutfair

Well-known member
Joined
May 28, 2009
Messages
10,207
They were spoilt , most of them grew up an only child or with just one sibling and so felt entitled.

However, the recession knocked the stuffing out of them which will hold them in good stead in the future. I think they now understand that the good economy won't last forever and there will be another recession so they need to save money.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 20, 2005
Messages
4,611
the factory iam working in mid 20's to 30's cut every corner, early 20's late teenagers put there head down and are good workers.

it has been discussed in the smoking shed the possible differences. One was part of a generation that was promised the sun, moon and stars, the other came up in the recession.

unfortunate for them but over time the process appears to work itself out.
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top