The new Investigatory Powers Act 2016

McTell

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No
Just voted for and not much said in the press here.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/19/extreme-surveillance-becomes-uk-law-with-barely-a-whimper

Investigatory Powers Bill: Commons stages - News from Parliament - UK Parliament


Do they need it, seeing as they're one of the Five Eyes (FVEY) ??

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Eyes


Object is to ID terrorists and child abusers, but "suspicionless surveillance" is now a fact of life in the UK. Maybe it always was, now it's legal. If the spooks want to zoom in on someone, they get a minister's permit that has to be checked by a judge.

Good, bad or let's wait and see???
 


Dame_Enda

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The Cameron and May govts have overseen an increasingly Orwellian level of controls on the internet.

It must be acknowledged though that unlike Ireland they have Parliamentary committee oversight of MI5/6
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I think it is one of those Acts that in the end will be framed not by the way it is written but in the way it is applied.

Abuses of the Investigatory Powers Act will surface in the courts I suspect in the end and there is the other thing of considerable embarrassment acting as an amendment to the Act when inevitably the security services and the police attempt to misuse it.

It is difficult sometimes to get across to people who have no nefarious activity in mind how these powers can be abused until in fact there is widespread outrage at an abuse of them.

And I suspect this will be the case here.
 

rainmaker

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Mar 26, 2012
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Just voted for and not much said in the press here.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/19/extreme-surveillance-becomes-uk-law-with-barely-a-whimper

Investigatory Powers Bill: Commons stages - News from Parliament - UK Parliament


Do they need it, seeing as they're one of the Five Eyes (FVEY) ??

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Eyes


Object is to ID terrorists and child abusers, but "suspicionless surveillance" is now a fact of life in the UK. Maybe it always was, now it's legal. If the spooks want to zoom in on someone, they get a minister's permit that has to be checked by a judge.

Good, bad or let's wait and see???
Relax - in practice it wont be as sinister as it sounds there.
 

McTell

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Oct 16, 2012
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No
Relax - in practice it wont be as sinister as it sounds there.



World Wide Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee says Investigatory Powers Bill is anti-democratic

'Snoopers law creates security nightmare' - BBC News

The "double-lock" - approval by a judge - boils down to the judge checking if the form has been filled in - not whether it's fair or not.


Tim Berners-Lee, who invented the wwweb, is worried

The inventor of the world wide web answered three questions about the new law:
What is your view of this legislation now that it has passed?
This snoopers charter has no place in a modern democracy - it undermines our fundamental rights online. The bulk collection of everyone's internet browsing data is disproportionate, creates a security nightmare for the ISPs who must store the data - and rides roughshod over our right to privacy. Meanwhile, the bulk hacking powers in the Bill risk making the internet less safe for everyone.
You previously tweeted "dark, dark days" about the bill passing. But early in November you told the Today Programme: "I feel it's important that we strengthen the accountability provisions." Was that strong enough - and do you regret not shouting louder?
Well, there's been sustained opposition to the Bill at almost every stage of its development. I spoke out about it strongly when it was first floated in May 2015, and as the Bill went through parliament, technology businesses united in opposition to it, civil society (including the Web Foundation) was strongly critical and a number of committees tasked with reviewing the Bill made sweeping criticisms.
So yes, now that the Bill has passed, I am left wondering what more I could have done personally, but government does seem to have been determined to railroad the Bill through, despite opposition from many diverse quarters.
Why do you think MPs didn't listen to opponents of the bill?
This Bill has come at an unprecedented time. Brexit - and other global political developments - have taken up the bulk of MPs time and attention in the past 18 months.
MPs were asked to review an incredibly complex Bill with over 500 pages of supporting documents in a tight timescale while other seismic political events were unfolding around them. The fact that most MPs are not technologists likely also played a role - they may simply not have understood just how intrusive the laws they were considering were.
 


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