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Malcolm Redfellow

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I dusted off another movie today I had been meaning to watch, The Best Man (1964), Henry Fonda is the leading candidate at a presidential convention, it's really good stuff for all ye political anoraks, even today it resonates.
Good on yer, ger12. A man of discretion and good judgement.

I relished The Best Man on its first run: I think at that cinema round the corner from the GPO — the Capitol(?), which would be an ironic name. Only from the screen credits did I get Gore Vidal as the author. Later still before I realised it was a screen adaptation from his 1960 Broadway play. Even more later, I nailed a paperback copy of the script. And, finally, a DVD of the original.

I interpreted the three main characters as:
  • Henry Fonda's "William Russell", the intellectual, as a parody of every well-meaning liberal Democrat from Veep Henry Wallace to Adlai Stevenson (now there's a tradition which persists, and fails each four years, down to the present).
  • Cliff Robertson's "Senator Joe Cantwell", the young thruster: too close to JFK (though, of course, it was also Nixon) — it seems — for the Gore Vidal/Kennedy relationship. "Cantrell" has a nice scene in the movie, seated in back of huge open Cadillac with a handful of index-cards: "Buy him. Burn him."
  • Lee Tracey's "President Art Hockstader", the Grand Old Man of the piece, with more than a bit of the Truman/Ike rustic basics about him. His put-down of "Russell" as an agnostic: "In those days we poured God over everything like ketchup."
My own taste? Lavish Hollywood musicals, but natch. And anything that involves a swash-buckling swing from the chandelier: e.g.: either version of The Prisoner of Zenda (Ronald Coleman in 1937, or Stewart Granger in 1952).


Anyone for those two magnificent Jacques Demy musicals, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and The Young Girls of Rochefort, if only to pant over the Dorléac sisters? Or wallow in Michel Legrand's soundtrack music?

 

ger12

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Good on yer, ger12. A man of discretion and good judgement.

I relished The Best Man on its first run: I think at that cinema round the corner from the GPO — the Capitol(?), which would be an ironic name. Only from the screen credits did I get Gore Vidal as the author. Later still before I realised it was a screen adaptation from his 1960 Broadway play. Even more later, I nailed a paperback copy of the script. And, finally, a DVD of the original.

I interpreted the three main characters as:
  • Henry Fonda's "William Russell", the intellectual, as a parody of every well-meaning liberal Democrat from Veep Henry Wallace to Adlai Stevenson (now there's a tradition which persists, and fails each four years, down to the present).
  • Cliff Robertson's "Senator Joe Cantwell", the young thruster: too close to JFK (though, of course, it was also Nixon) — it seems — for the Gore Vidal/Kennedy relationship. "Cantrell" has a nice scene in the movie, seated in back of huge open Cadillac with a handful of index-cards: "Buy him. Burn him."
  • Lee Tracey's "President Art Hockstader", the Grand Old Man of the piece, with more than a bit of the Truman/Ike rustic basics about him. His put-down of "Russell" as an agnostic: "In those days we poured God over everything like ketchup."
My own taste? Lavish Hollywood musicals, but natch. And anything that involves a swash-buckling swing from the chandelier: e.g.: either version of The Prisoner of Zenda (Ronald Coleman in 1937, or Stewart Granger in 1952).


Anyone for those two magnificent Jacques Demy musicals, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and The Young Girls of Rochefort, if only to pant over the Dorléac sisters? Or wallow in Michel Legrand's soundtrack music?

I felt a little sorry for Joe in the end, I'm not sure why, he was such unsavoury character. I do love Fonda, yet his character was a tad irritating.

Lee Tracey was great.

I'm a she btw. Wouldn't be a great fan of the big swashbuckling musicals, although I quite enjoy the like of Deanna Durbin in His Butlers Sister (1943).

They really don't make them like that these days ...
 

silverharp

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39 Steps is one I can always re watch when its on.
 

Seanie Lemass

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Moby Dick, directed by John Huston, with Gregory Peck, and our own Noel Purcell as a sailor and partly shot in Youghal, is great film.


Not sure if entire film is on utube.

The recent film based on the "true story" - In the Heart of the Sea, with Brendan Gleeson, is excellent too.
 

ger12

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Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951).

Ava Gardner and the oh very sexy James Mason. Set in the 1930's, it's mysterious and fascinating. A dark love story.
 

ger12

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This time of the year, two beautiful movies come to mind.

The great Jimmy Stewart in It's a Wonderful Life (1946).

And David Niven, Loretta Young and Cary Grant in The Bishops Wife (1948).
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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I'm a she btw.
Apologies for a typical and chauvinist assumption.

I felt a little sorry for Joe in the end, I'm not sure why, he was such unsavoury character. I do love Fonda, yet his character was a tad irritating.
Odd, that. Both Cantwell and Russell are seriously flawed characters; but each of us chooses the one nearest our own inadequacies? Russell comes out well: he — after all — "chooses" the next candidate (Governor Merwin); he dishes Cantwell and without using the "dirt" he has on the man; keeps his own sense of integrity; he rebuilds a relationship with his estranged wife. But it's the cynical Gore Vidal who shines through:
Jensen (Russell's campaign manager): You don't even know Merwin. Nobody knows him. He's a man without a face.
Russell: Don't underestimate him. Men without faces tend to get elected President, and power or responsibility or honour fill in the features, usually pretty well.
Would it were so.
 

redhead

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I felt a little sorry for Joe in the end, I'm not sure why, he was such unsavoury character. I do love Fonda, yet his character was a tad irritating.

Lee Tracey was great.

I'm a she btw. Wouldn't be a great fan of the big swashbuckling musicals, although I quite enjoy the like of Deanna Durbin in His Butlers Sister (1943).

They really don't make them like that these days ...
Was thinking of that last night, used to show all those movies on BBC2 on a Saturday afternoon in the early 80's, along with other classics, such a great movie education...
 

Truth.ie

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Odd Man Out.
James Mason plays a wounded IRA Chief trying to make his way to safety across Belfast.
Set in the 1940s.


I showed Papillon and One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest to my younger family members and they all sat through both without fidgeting or footering about on their mobiles.
They thought they were great movies.
Few movies can achieve cross-generational emotions.
 

Seanie Lemass

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Was thinking of that last night, used to show all those movies on BBC2 on a Saturday afternoon in the early 80's, along with other classics, such a great movie education...

Channel Four late night - Friday I think - was absolute gold mine of noir. that would have been around early to mid 80s.

Hard to believe it has descended into probably the biggest purveyor of sh1te outside of the worst US cable channels ....
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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One "seasonal" film for which I hold considerable affection: the "Film Four" piece, Singleton's Pluck. Ben Singleton (Ian Holm) navigates his flock of Norfolk geese to the London market, despite every opposition around. Directed by Richard Eyre, no less.

Sentimental, but fun. And it seems to have vanished, without trace.
 

redhead

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Anyone for those two magnificent Jacques Demy musicals, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and The Young Girls of Rochefort, if only to pant over the Dorléac sisters? Or wallow in Michel Legrand's soundtrack music?

Les Demoiselles is often overlooked in favour of the brollies but for anyone who is a fan of Gene Kelly it is a magnificent showcase of his skills as a choreographer as well as dancer and the production design is spectacular.
 

ger12

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Alfred Hitchcock directed Rebecca (1940), Daphne du Maurier's 1938 novel.

 

Truth.ie

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Channel Four late night - Friday I think - was absolute gold mine of noir. that would have been around early to mid 80s.

Hard to believe it has descended into probably the biggest purveyor of sh1te outside of the worst US cable channels ....
Was that the season with the Red Triangle warning on the screens (meant to warn of explicit sex or violence) but was in reality just the clickbait of the 80's.
 

Franzoni

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343 if you have a Sky box has a lot of old B&W films... mainly old British films.....

One of my favs...the folks were big fans of the old films so we saw a lot of them growing up...

 

danger here

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If by old you mean anything not super modern or blockbustery then I'm yer only man (don't tell my wife) :)




















 

Dasayev

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A couple of films from the 40s that I don't think have been mentioned - Notorious with Grant and Bergman, and the musical On The Town.
 

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