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The Real Role of Newgrange?


MauriceColgan

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The Boyne Valley Revision - Winter Solstice conference with Martin Brennan at Newgrange

What are the views of those interested in the matter on the above link apart from it being a very expensive lecture.
I always thought the theories a little TOO theoretical.
All that effort to build those many monumental structures must have had a great plan in mind.

Those Ancient Irish engineers certainly did a great job for our modern day tourist figures. Newgrange is always humming whenever we go there throughout the year... for the lovely cake. :)
 

The Caped Cod

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There is a tendancy in the study of megalithic monuments to label the unknown or unexplained as a 'tomb'. Given the links between early astrology and spirituality (the druids being a prime example) it is unsurprising to find human remains in these monuments, but dismissing them as simple tombs seems to take away from the amazing celestial alignment of some of them like the great pyramid in Eygpt, Newgrange or Stonehenge, or indeed some of the incredible monuments of the south AMerican Aztecs, Incas and Mayans.
My guess is that these monuments represented observatory and church, as well as a tomb for kings, however I think that perhaps it was the kings who wished to be associated with the granduer of the monument rather than the other way around.
 

FakeViking

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:) I had to look that up.

Seriously, the grub at the Newgrange interpretive centre is worth the trip! Besides we need more Irish accents there.

People from all over the world arrive in their thousands........everyday it it seems.
Haven't tried the grub in the IC but Newgrange is a gem, particularly on a frosty winter morning! Note to self: visit more often!
 

yehbut_nobut

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they were centres of initiation into the Hibernian mysteries. So there!
 

Fing Fers

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:) I had to look that up.

Seriously, the grub at the Newgrange interpretive centre is worth the trip! Besides we need more Irish accents there.

People from all over the world arrive in their thousands........everyday it it seems.
The catering company in the Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre recently lost the contract, heard the news yesterday, no more good grub.
 

MauriceColgan

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The catering company in the Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre recently lost the contract, heard the news yesterday, no more good grub.
Drat! Investigation called for. We shall be visiting Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre in the near future!

The nearby Farmhouse cafe may not be open? So pub grub in Slane may be the answer, or 30 minutes back home for a delicious Welsh Rarebit!!
 

Fing Fers

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Drat! Investigation called for. We shall be visiting Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre in the near future!

The nearby Farmhouse cafe may not be open? So pub grub in Slane may be the answer, or 30 minutes back home for a delicious Welsh Rarebit!!
You could go to Daly's in Donore, only 5 mins away. The restaurant in the center will more than likely stay open, just a change of catering staff, cost cutting measures and all that.
 

sickpuppy

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My guess is that these monuments represented observatory and church, as well as a tomb for kings, however I think that perhaps it was the kings who wished to be associated with the granduer of the monument rather than the other way around.
you may have a point, i believe Queen Maeve's grave in sligo is on a tomb that is a lot older
 

MauriceColgan

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You could go to Daly's in Donore, only 5 mins away. The restaurant in the center will more than likely stay open, just a change of catering staff, cost cutting measures and all that.
Thanks. We would visit anyway to see the Americans quaking on the vibrating foot bridge over the river Boyne when a heavy and lumbering very large guy crossed. :)

Meath Attractions - Things to see in County Meath Ireland Looks decent enough with all those other places close by. Seen most but not all of them. Roll on Spring!
 

MauriceColgan

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The high cross's in Monasterboice are forgotten also left unprotected.

Concern over Muiredach's Cross at Monasterboice

That was 2004 and not many changes since then.
Perhaps those historic crosses should be treated with a solution of silicone? Rainwater would then run off them rapidly.

We have been slow to appreciate our magnificent and very ancient culture. But thanks to those webpages we will see it's a growth industry. Cultural tourism would be enormous if the powers that be could be moved to real action, and imagination!
 
S

SeamusNapoleon

I took a module in Archaeology last year and my lecturer rememebers Brennan from when she worked on the Boyne Valley (Knowth or Dowth, I can't recall) in the 80s as a postgrad student.

She said that the archaeologists in Ireland at the time has their theories and stuck with them. They reacted with real hostility and ridiculing if anybody souhgt to put across other theories - on any prehistoric sites.

My lecturer spoke of being in the food tent at the dig site and the head archaeologist come in saying, 'That nut is coming up the road again, nobody is to talk to him' (referring to Brennan).

He was never allowed onto the sites to test his own theories out.
Even when he was proven right at Rathcairn - with media witnesses - the establishment academics refused to acknowledge this.

Fair play to him. I'm gonna try and get up for this talk.
 

The Caped Cod

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Perhaps those historic crosses should be treated with a solution of silicone? Rainwater would then run off them rapidly.

We have been slow to appreciate our magnificent and very ancient culture. But thanks to those webpages we will see it's a growth industry. Cultural tourism would be enormous if the powers that be could be moved to real action, and imagination!
Indeed, but when we have a government who think that the hill of Tara would make a good truck-stop I've the feeling many of our cultural monuments will lie forgetten and uncared for by all but a few for a while to come.
 

MauriceColgan

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I took a module in Archaeology last year and my lecturer rememebers Brennan from when she worked on the Boyne Valley (Knowth or Dowth, I can't recall) in the 80s as a postgrad student.

She said that the archaeologists in Ireland at the time has their theories and stuck with them. They reacted with real hostility and ridiculing if anybody souhgt to put across other theories - on any prehistoric sites.

My lecturer spoke of being in the food tent at the dig site and the head archaeologist come in saying, 'That nut is coming up the road again, nobody is to talk to him' (referring to Brennan).

He was never allowed onto the sites to test his own theories out.
Even when he was proven right at Rathcairn - with media witnesses - the establishment academics refused to acknowledge this.

Fair play to him. I'm gonna try and get up for this talk.
Thanks. Very interesting I will have to read some of his stuff, if I have not already. My wife is a demon for moving books from place to place, room to shed!

As for a truck stop at Tara.... the offending road is miles away. Not like the major road passing close to Stonehenge in the UK.
 

Fing Fers

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Perhaps those historic crosses should be treated with a solution of silicone? Rainwater would then run off them rapidly.

We have been slow to appreciate our magnificent and very ancient culture. But thanks to those webpages we will see it's a growth industry. Cultural tourism would be enormous if the powers that be could be moved to real action, and imagination!
I stopped of at Monasterboice today, nothing has been done since the last time I was there. I can see those crosses falling over in the near future. One of them is eroded at the bottom and its very obvious, another has a very obvious crack with no sign of repair. Those crosses are very top heavy, it wouldn't take much to bring them down should they be weakened in any way. As everything in this country nothing will be done until the worst happens. The site there is totally neglected.

If you've ever been out at the site, there is a house next door, its got nice stone piers at the front gate more than likely built from the rubble left over from the deteriorating round tower also located in the site.
 
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