The Red, White & Blue

Anglo Celt

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Can anyone explain to me why so many countries have red, white and blue flags? Coincidence? I can think of about 30 off the top of my head.
 


controller

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RED, WHITE, and BLUE are often colors the represent revolution and freedom, many of which are based upon the French tricolor.
 

shutuplaura

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Some flags are based on the US one - Liberia and Malaysia are anyway.
 

eoghanacht

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Primary colours. Christ some of you need to get a life.
 

Jakey

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I think I'm right in saying that both the French and the US took their colours from the Union Jack, and much of the rest of the world followed suit.
 

Observer

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I think I'm right in saying that both the French and the US took their colours from the Union Jack, and much of the rest of the world followed suit.
The Americans may have done; the French colours, though, were originally a combination of the colours of Paris (blue and red) and those of the Bourbons (white) - this would have been devised in the interval after the storming of the Bastille but before Louis XVI went and got his head chopped off.

Blue against white and red against white have a strong element of contrast, which is why they would have been widely used as colour schemes on their own even pre-18th century.
 

myhonorisloyalty666

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Red represents courage.
Blue represents the sky.
White represents purity.

White, the original colour of the masonic apron, was always considered an emblem of purity and innocence, exemplified in images such as the white lily or fallen snow.

Blue was used royally in France noticeably as the background to the fleur-de-lys. It became associated with terms of prestige such as blue blood, cordon bleu (originally the sash of the Order of the Holy Spirit), blue riband (of the Atlantic) and blue chip.

Red or crimson, the colour of fire and heat, is traditionally associated with war and the military. In Rome the paludamentum, the robe wom by generals, was red. The colour of blood is naturally connected with the idea of sacrifice, struggle and heroism. It also signifies charity, devotion, abnegation perhaps recalling the pelican that feeds its progeny with its own blood.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Red represents courage.
Blue represents the sky.
White represents purity.

White, the original colour of the masonic apron, was always considered an emblem of purity and innocence, exemplified in images such as the white lily or fallen snow.

Blue was used royally in France noticeably as the background to the fleur-de-lys. It became associated with terms of prestige such as blue blood, cordon bleu (originally the sash of the Order of the Holy Spirit), blue riband (of the Atlantic) and blue chip.

Red or crimson, the colour of fire and heat, is traditionally associated with war and the military. In Rome the paludamentum, the robe wom by generals, was red. The colour of blood is naturally connected with the idea of sacrifice, struggle and heroism. It also signifies charity, devotion, abnegation perhaps recalling the pelican that feeds its progeny with its own blood.
Which also is trimmed in blue for the 3rd degree, and red from the pelican in Rose Croix. So was George Washington the main influence on these colours :)
 

SlabMurphy

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RED, WHITE, and BLUE are often colors the represent revolution and freedom, many of which are based upon the French tricolor.
Don't know if it's true, but I once heard that our tricolour was designed as primarily a tribute to the French revolutionaries rather than a way of including the orangemen as part of the nation on it. We should have stayed with the old design of a harp on a green background. Hopefully some day we will go back to it.
 
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ManfredJudge

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Why is France mentioned in a discussion on Red, White, and Blue flags?
Did Star Trek teach you nothing?
 

antiestablishmentarian

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RED, WHITE, and BLUE are often colors the represent revolution and freedom, many of which are based upon the French tricolor.
The red and blue in the French tricolour represent the traditional colours of Paris, while the white represents the royal colour of the Bourbon family. The cockade of blue, white and red was meant to symbolise the humbling of the monarchy by the Parisian masses following the capture of the Bastille and the forced evacuation of the Royal family from Versailles to the Tuileries Palace.
 

stripey cat

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Don't know if it's true, but I once heard that our tricolour was designed as primarily a tribute to the French revolutionaries rather than a way of including the orangemen as part of the nation on it. We should have stayed with the old design of a harp on a green background. Hopefully some day we will go back to it.
The traditional colour of the Irish flag was blue, and Ireland is represented by blue in heraldry. The President still uses a blue flag I think, as do the British royals when they include us in their flag waving ceremonies.

The symbolism of green in the Irish flag comes from notions of a revolutionary growth and new beginnings. Green had been a colour associated with heraldic notions of regrowth and the Spring season, as well as agriculture, defence of the land, and respect for the common people. Colors of Heraldry - Knowledge Base, HouseofNames.com

It became common for revolutionaries to attach green boughs to their clothing to indicate their respect for the masses rather than for gentry.

This turned into green ribbons and green flags.

If we ever went back to the "original flag" it would really have to be blue.

The White and Orange of the current national flag do refer to the Protestant community and the desire of the flag's designers to see peace beteeen the two religious groups on the island at that time . In the words of Thomas Francis Meagher: "The white in the centre signifies a lasting truce between the 'Orange' and the 'Green,' and I trust that beneath its folds the hands of the Irish Protestant and the Irish Catholic may be clasped in generous and heroic brotherhood".
 

SideysGhost

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Wot stripey cat said. The harp-on-green only really became popular after 1798, and the closest to an "authentic original" flag is the harp-on-blue. But of course that flag is, like the county system, a British invention. There's a lot of argument about what flag (if any) O'Neill flew at Kinsale, or if there were any national emblems back in Brehonic times.

These days the flag of the pseudoRepublic should probably be a circle of brown envelopes enclosing a half-built apartment block in Roscommon, on a yellow background.
 


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