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The rise of Anti-Semitism in Germany

silverharp

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interesting NY Times article on the rise of anti semitism in Germany, Jewish people (200k in Germany) are being advised to not wear anything that would identify them as being Jewish. The question as i see it is , does the German state owe Jewish people a particular duty of care, i would say hell yeah but they seem to be treated as if they are expendable.
do Jewish people have a future in Germany, should they knuckle under and hide their identities?



an example of how it doesnt pay to identify as Jewish if going to school
....The first few days there seemed to go well. Solomon, an affable kid with an easy smile, bonded with one classmate over their common affection for rap music. That classmate introduced him to a German-Turkish rapper who would rap about “Allah and stuff,” Solomon told me. In return, he introduced the classmate to American and British rap. Solomon had a feeling they would end up being best friends. On the fourth day, when Solomon was in ethics class, the teachers asked the students what houses of worship they had been to. One student mentioned a mosque. Another mentioned a church. Solomon raised his hand and said he’d been to a synagogue. There was a strange silence, Solomon later recalled. One teacher asked how he had encountered a synagogue.

“I’m Jewish,” Solomon said.

“Everyone was shocked, especially the teachers,” Solomon later told me about this moment. After class, a teacher told Solomon that he was “very brave.” Solomon was perplexed. As Gemma explained: “He didn’t know that you’re not meant to tell anyone.”

The following day, Solomon brought brownies to school for his birthday. He was giving them out during lunch when the boy he had hoped would be his best friend informed him that there were a lot of Muslim students at the school who used the word “Jew” as an insult. Solomon wondered whether his friend included himself in this category, and so after school, he asked for clarification. The boy put his arm around Solomon’s shoulders and told him that, though he was a “real babo” — Kurdish slang for “boss” — they couldn’t be friends, because Jews and Muslims could not be friends. The classmate then rattled off a series of anti-Semitic comments, according to Solomon: that Jews were murderers, only interested in money.

Over the next few months, Solomon was bullied in an increasingly aggressive fashion. One day, he returned home with a large bruise from a punch on the back. On another occasion, Solomon was walking home and stopped into a bakery. When he emerged, he found one of his tormentors pointing what looked like a handgun at him. Solomon’s heart raced. The boy pulled the trigger. Click. The gun turned out to be a fake. But it gave Solomon the scare of his life.

in a huge piece of irony
An incident that garnered considerable attention and highlights some of the complexities of this new dynamic occurred on a Berlin street in April 2018, when a 19-year-old Syrian of Palestinian descent took off his belt and flogged a young Israeli man named Adam Armoush, who was wearing a yarmulke. The attacker yelled “Yehudi!” — Arabic for “Jew.” Armoush recorded the attack with his phone for “the world to see how terrible it is these days as a Jew to go through Berlin streets,” as he later put it in a television interview. Schuster advised Jews in cities against openly wearing yarmulkes outside. Almost lost in the uproar was Armoush’s bizarre admission that he was not Jewish but rather an Israeli Arab. He said he received the yarmulke from a friend along with a caveat that it was not safe to wear outside. Armoush said he initially debated this. “I was saying that it’s really safe,” he said. “I wanted to prove it. But it ended like that.”
 


former wesleyan

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Dame_Enda

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I don't think there's much Christian anti semitism in Germany. There is however a growing problem of Islamist anti-semitism in France particularly, and perhaps in some cases in Germany. I think though that a lot of it has to be seen in the context of coming from countries that have been in a state of war with Israel for 70 years, or being descended from refugees from those conflicts in some cases. There would have been a lot of anti British sentiment for a long time from persons of Irish descent in the US and Australia during British rule and to some extent during the NI conflict.

Just as the end of the NI conflict improved British-Irish relations greatly (though there have been disagreements over Brexit and some harsh words exchanged), I think a peace deal in the Middle East would help reduce anti semitism.
 

The Field Marshal

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Funny how anti semitism is lambasted whilst anti catholocism gets a free pass.
 

Beachcomber

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interesting NY Times article on the rise of anti semitism in Germany, Jewish people (200k in Germany) are being advised to not wear anything that would identify them as being Jewish. The question as i see it is , does the German state owe Jewish people a particular duty of care, i would say hell yeah but they seem to be treated as if they are expendable.
do Jewish people have a future in Germany, should they knuckle under and hide their identities?



an example of how it doesnt pay to identify as Jewish if going to school

Looks like it's Muslims that are the source of this hatred of Jewish people.
 

Dame_Enda

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One of the things that fuels anti semitism is when the politicians equate it with criticism of Israel. This risks making anti semitism respectable by wrongly equating it with support for the oppressed Palestinians. In fact support for Palestine is not anti semitic. Many Jews support Palestine.

In Ireland most of our politicians are either indifferent to the conflict in the Middle East or are pro Palestinian. Yet anti semitic incidents in Ireland are very low compared to the rest of Europe. This proves my point.
 

former wesleyan

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One of the things that fuels anti semitism is when the politicians equate it with criticism of Israel. This risks making anti semitism respectable by wrongly equating it with support for the oppressed Palestinians. In fact support for Palestine is not anti semitic. Many Jews support Palestine.

In Ireland most of our politicians are either indifferent to the conflict in the Middle East or are pro Palestinian. Yet anti semitic incidents in Ireland are very low compared to the rest of Europe. This proves my point.
Do they use anti-semitic themes to do that ? And why, if they don't, can't non-Jews do the same ?
 

Barroso

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interesting NY Times article on the rise of anti semitism in Germany, Jewish people (200k in Germany) are being advised to not wear anything that would identify them as being Jewish. The question as i see it is , does the German state owe Jewish people a particular duty of care, i would say hell yeah but they seem to be treated as if they are expendable.
do Jewish people have a future in Germany, should they knuckle under and hide their identities?



an example of how it doesnt pay to identify as Jewish if going to school
Support for Israel is dropping in the US and in Germany, the two key allies.
So NY Times tries to whip up some support for poor ickle put upon Israel via made-up stories about violence against jews in Germany.

The fact is though that most jews in Germany are refugees from the zionist war machine. I recently read an article that estimated there are a million israeli jews in the US who have fled from the place; and there are hundreds of thousands more in Europe. The place will fall apart through its own weight as the better-educated and the young in general leave in droves.
 

Dame_Enda

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Another thing that doesnt help the fight against anti semitism is when governments treat Likud and the nationalist side in Israeli politics as the sole legitimate representatives of Judaism. This is reflected in the backlash from the British Israeli lobby when Corbyn met with a leftwing Jewish group recently. The British Board of Deputies seems uncritical of Israel, even when the Gaza massacre happened. The ADL in the US began as a reaction to an anti semitic lynching in Georgia but instead of focusing on preventing such things, they have become a more or less permanent apologist for the Israeli governments policies.
 

former wesleyan

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Another thing that doesnt help the fight against anti semitism is when governments treat Likud and the nationalist side in Israeli politics as the sole legitimate representatives of Judaism. This is reflected in the backlash from the British Israeli lobby when Corbyn met with a leftwing Jewish group recently. The British Board of Deputies seems uncritical of Israel, even when the Gaza massacre happened. The ADL in the US began as a reaction to an anti semitic lynching in Georgia but instead of focusing on preventing such things, they have become a more or less permanent apologist for the Israeli governments policies.
Th JVL ? Whose leader Jenny Manson admitted that she only identified as a Jew in order to defend Corbyn . That " leftwing " group ?
 

Dame_Enda

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The Zionists also had Jewish supporter of Palestine, Jackie Walker, thrown out of Labour for questioning why other groups are not included in the definition of the Holocaust.

Jackie Walker (activist) - Wikipedia

There are parallels with how the Catholic Church in Ireland used to get mobs to hound those who spoke out of turn on issues it disagreed with.
 

Dame_Enda

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Sadly there's a lot of Jew hating on the Irish intolerant Left.
Many Jews oppose Israel's treatment of the Palestinians just as many Irish Catholics opposed the Magdalene launderies and Industrial schools in the past. Then as now, the religious Establishment tries to silence criticism.
 

Peter72

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Many Jews oppose Israel's treatment of the Palestinians just as many Irish Catholics opposed the Magdalene launderies and Industrial schools in the past. Then as now, the religious Establishment tries to silence criticism.
That in no way diminishes my previous point.
 

owedtojoy

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Support for Israel is dropping in the US and in Germany, the two key allies.
So NY Times tries to whip up some support for poor ickle put upon Israel via made-up stories about violence against jews in Germany.

The fact is though that most jews in Germany are refugees from the zionist war machine. I recently read an article that estimated there are a million israeli jews in the US who have fled from the place; and there are hundreds of thousands more in Europe. The place will fall apart through its own weight as the better-educated and the young in general leave in droves.
Anti-Semitic attacks have increased in Europe and the US.


Jews may be leaving Israel, but that is because the country is becoming less liberal and tolerant of differences.
 

owedtojoy

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Many Jews oppose Israel's treatment of the Palestinians just as many Irish Catholics opposed the Magdalene launderies and Industrial schools in the past. Then as now, the religious Establishment tries to silence criticism.
For most of their existence, the Magdalene Laundries were not opposed, and then maybe only by a handful. Can you name one single political figure that spoke up about them?

Quiet criticism began in the 1960s with more tolerant social attitudes, but it took years.

Of course, many Jews do oppose the Palestinian policies of Israel, but the peace movement and the Left generally in Israel became divided and weakened.
 

Dame_Enda

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I agree it took an incredibly long time before the launderies were criticised. Criticism of the ban on condoms started much earlier though with the womens train protests. There are parallels though. Like with Israel, the Religious Establishment tries to close down debate, just as the Catholic hierarchy did with divorce, contraception, LGBT rights etc. There are parallels between the role of the RCC during the Crusades and that of some of the Jewish rightwing clergy in their support for the Occupation and settlements.

On of the reasons this happens is that Reform Judaism is not recognised by the Israeli state, no doubt because they fear doing so would strengthen the liberal bloc over there. It has been reported that Bibi has been pressuring Western governments including Germany to cancel state funding for liberal Israeli groups like the New Israel Fund. Western govts are being pressured into suppressing liberal Jewish voices by the Likud government, under the pretence of "fighting anti semitism". In doing so it alienates leftwing and liberal opinion in the West.
 
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