The systematic cruelty of the UK's benefit system.

O

Oscurito

Mr Gritty Social Realism aka Ken Loach has done it again - producing another film about those who have fallen through the net of British society and seem destined to end their days permanently poor and permanently excluded.

In his latest film, I, Daniel Blake, he deals with the case of a middle-aged unemployed man whose doctor says he's too ill to work. However, the staff members at the local job centre say he's fine and so he must sign on for job seekers' allowance. To be eligible for this, he must be able to show his efforts to apply for work on a weekly basis.

Daniel Blake doesn't exist but the people in the video below do. Mervyn Newton's doctor says he's not fit for work because of poor eyesight and arthritis in his hands but the medical non-experts at the job centre say that he is. Lacking computer skills, he's forced to hand-write letters every week to the tiny number of local employers to inquire about jobs. Even if there were any jobs, he wouldn't stand a chance against far younger competitors. However, he has to keep doing it to get 70 pounds a week in job seekers allowance.

What's it like here? Is it that bad?

The Guardian: I, Daniel Blake review – a battle cry for the dispossessed


[video=youtube;cKaX5wMyMqQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKaX5wMyMqQ[/video]
 


Novos

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You just hate those Brits. That's fine but it does them no harm, it just poisons the hater. That you.
 

Dub01

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Mr Gritty Social Realism aka Ken Loach has done it again - producing another film about those who have fallen through the net of British society and seem destined to end their days permanently poor and permanently excluded.

In his latest film, I, Daniel Blake, he deals with the case of a middle-aged unemployed man whose doctor says he's too ill to work. However, the staff members at the local job centre say he's fine and so he must sign on for job seekers' allowance. To be eligible for this, he must be able to show his efforts to apply for work on a weekly basis.

Daniel Blake doesn't exist but the people in the video below do. Mervyn Newton's doctor says he's not fit for work because of poor eyesight and arthritis in his hands but the medical non-experts at the job centre say that he is. Lacking computer skills, he's forced to hand-write letters every week to the tiny number of local employers to inquire about jobs. Even if there were any jobs, he wouldn't stand a chance against far younger competitors. However, he has to keep doing it to get 70 pounds a week in job seekers allowance.

What's it like here? Is it that bad?

]
I signed on once in London back in the eighties. I spent two days queuing and going through aggressive interviews. At the end of the two days they gave me a cheque for four quid and told me to come back the next day.

I never went back. Some experiences are just too humiliating to repeat twice.
 

sadcitizen

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The exact same things are happening here now, in the sense that wretched, afflicted auld people are having to justify their daily existence to 22 year olds in Jobpath each week to avoid penalties. We at least have a decent rate of welfare in comparison to the UK.
 
O

Oscurito

The exact same things are happening here now, in the sense that wretched, afflicted auld people are having to justify their daily existence to 22 year olds in Jobpath each week to avoid penalties. We at least have a decent rate of welfare in comparison to the UK.
From what I can determine, he's getting the equivalent of about 80 euro per week. No wonder his fridge is empty.
 

talkingshop

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Mr Gritty Social Realism aka Ken Loach has done it again - producing another film about those who have fallen through the net of British society and seem destined to end their days permanently poor and permanently excluded.

In his latest film, I, Daniel Blake, he deals with the case of a middle-aged unemployed man whose doctor says he's too ill to work. However, the staff members at the local job centre say he's fine and so he must sign on for job seekers' allowance. To be eligible for this, he must be able to show his efforts to apply for work on a weekly basis.

Daniel Blake doesn't exist but the people in the video below do. Mervyn Newton's doctor says he's not fit for work because of poor eyesight and arthritis in his hands but the medical non-experts at the job centre say that he is. Lacking computer skills, he's forced to hand-write letters every week to the tiny number of local employers to inquire about jobs. Even if there were any jobs, he wouldn't stand a chance against far younger competitors. However, he has to keep doing it to get 70 pounds a week in job seekers allowance.

What's it like here? Is it that bad?

The Guardian: I, Daniel Blake review – a battle cry for the dispossessed


[video=youtube;cKaX5wMyMqQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKaX5wMyMqQ[/video]
That sounds weird - do they not refer him for their own medical assessment?
 

GDPR

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Yeah, JSA is 67 quid a week - and you work for it. Very hard to explain to posters on here who think the unemployed in NI are swaddled in luxury.

They can also send you where they like to any job vacancy that you appear minimally qualified to do or in many cases is well below your skills level, and you must produce fb on how the interview went.

Interesting in the film that it appears to be his GP who says he is not fit to work. In those circs, he wouldnt be applying for JSA but disability benefit. Usually, the Work Capability Assessment is carried out by ATOS, the govt medical inspection team, and they would bump him off disability and back on to JSA.
 

Kevin Parlon

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People who describe imperfect benefit systems (money given to you by other people because those other people have elected to create a system in which the unfortunate and disadvantaged are assisted by everyone else) as "systematic cruelty" don't understand how the benefits system works, don't understand the word "systematic" and don't understand the meaning of the word "cruelty".
 

GDPR

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The way the UK system works is they try to minimise the numbers on the live register by forcing them into any available employment at all, but most of this will be minimum wage. So they boost their income by tax credits.

Its basically subsidising the employer.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Yeah, JSA is 67 quid a week - and you work for it. Very hard to explain to posters on here who think the unemployed in NI are swaddled in luxury.

They can also send you where they like to any job vacancy that you appear minimally qualified to do or in many cases is well below your skills level, and you must produce fb on how the interview went.

Interesting in the film that it appears to be his GP who says he is not fit to work. In those circs, he wouldnt be applying for JSA but disability benefit. Usually, the Work Capability Assessment is carried out by ATOS, the govt medical inspection team, and they would bump him off disability and back on to JSA.
You mean to tell me that they are not all rolling around in luxury on Benefit Street, like they tell me in the British newspapers?

Surely the Daily Mail would not lie to me?
 
O

Oscurito

People who describe imperfect benefit systems (money given to you by other people because those other people have elected to create a system in which the unfortunate and disadvantaged are assisted by everyone else) as "systematic cruelty" don't understand how the benefits system works, don't understand the word "systematic" and don't understand the meaning of the word "cruelty".
Unless you have information to the contrary, the word "systematic" is appropriate given that producing evidence that one has been applying for jobs is an inherent part of the system.

Likewise, "cruelty" seems to be appropriate given that a guy with arthritis in his hands is being forced to write letters with his bare hands on a weekly basis to apply for jobs that don't seem to exist.

I was going to add "and pointless" after "systematic". What do ya think, a Chaoimhín?
 

popular1

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I signed on once in London back in the eighties. I spent two days queuing and going through aggressive interviews. At the end of the two days they gave me a cheque for four quid and told me to come back the next day.

I never went back. Some experiences are just too humiliating to repeat twice.
You must have been very niave
I know people that had 3 claims going including rent allowance and working at the same time.in the eighties.
I also.know of.occasions when the rent cheques kept coming for months after people stopped signing and had left the country.
 

storybud1

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The sense of entitlement to other peoples money is mindblowing and defeatist. get a sh1t job and work your way up. It is really that fooking simple. Life owes you nothing that you have not put it, hence the queues at Calais and Greece.

If you think that is too much then you have wasted your opportunity.
 

talkingshop

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Unless you have information to the contrary, the word "systematic" is appropriate given that producing evidence that one has been applying for jobs is an inherent part of the system.

Likewise, "cruelty" seems to be appropriate given that a guy with arthritis in his hands is being forced to write letters with his bare hands on a weekly basis to apply for jobs that don't seem to exist.

I was going to add "and pointless" after "systematic". What do ya think, a Chaoimhín?
It's reasonable that applying for jobs would be part of the system. Why shouldn't it be? However if someone is medically unfit for any work, that is a different thing - then, as another poster pointed out, they should be on disability benefit.
 
O

Oscurito

It's reasonable that applying for jobs would be part of the system. Why shouldn't it be? However if someone is medically unfit for any work, that is a different thing - then, as another poster pointed out, they should be on disability benefit.
Yes, but Mr Parlon took specific issue with my use of the word "systematic". My usage of the word would only be wrong if what I'm talking about weren't part of the system. Clearly, it is.
 

Old Mr Grouser

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I signed on once in London back in the eighties. I spent two days queuing and going through aggressive interviews. At the end of the two days they gave me a cheque for four quid and told me to come back the next day.

I never went back. Some experiences are just too humiliating to repeat twice.
That's typical.

This is something you just couldn't make up - Man, 80, admits benefit fraud in York - and ends up receiving more benefits (From York Press)

In England a man of 80 - he and his wife are both invalids - was taken to court for Benefit Fraud, fined £85 and given a a six-month suspended prison sentence.

He had received £19,005.88 he was not entitled to. He pleaded that he had made an innocent mistake, and he had agreed to a repayment plan; so far he'd repaid £626.

During the investigation it came to light that he and his wife were not claiming all the benefits that they were entitled to - two sets of Carer's Allowances - so they're now getting substantially more money than before.

I wonder what the Court Fees were, and how much the two sets of lawyers were paid.
Meanwhile the real rogues get away with massive benefits-fraud year in year out.

But it's easier to check and jump on the vulnerable people who won't fight back.


[video=youtube;n8Kxq9uFDes]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8Kxq9uFDes[/video]
 


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