The Toughest Trade

gerhard dengler

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Did any of ye watch it?

Donegal GAA player Michael Murphy playing rugby at Clermont Auvergne, while ex-Wales and British & Irish Lions player Shane Williams playing GAA football with Glenswilly GAA team.

It was a really interesting programme.

Of course it is far easier for a professional to play an amateur sport than it is for an amateur player to adapt to professional sport.

The setup with Clermont is as professional as you are going to get in rugby. The facilities, the criteria selection is second to none. But fair dues to Michael Murphy he did really well.

Shane Williams is a class act and he seemed to adapt to GAA football easily.

The interesting part is the skill set and how each acquired the basics so easily.
 
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Did any of ye watch it?

Donegal GAA player Michael Murphy playing rugby at Clermont Auvergne, while ex-Wales and British & Irish Lions player Shane Williams playing GAA football with Glenswilly GAA team.

It was a really interesting programme.

Of course it is far easier for a professional to play an amateur sport than it is for an amateur player to adapt to professional sport.

The setup with Clermont is as professional as you are going to get in rugby. The facilities, the criteria selection is second to none. But fair dues to Michael Murphy he did really well.

Shane Williams is a class act and he seemed to adapt to GAA football easily.

The interesting part is the skill set and how each acquired the basics so easily.
There seems to be a growing awareness among professional sports coaches that some sports can borrow skills or techniques from others. A couple of county cricket clubs in the UK draft in hurlers for a couple of sessions in preseason training to aid in some fielding drills as well as switch-hitting. I think that Peter Schmeichel may have been in the vanguard of this - his star jump was essentially copied from Olympic Handball. Hockey, also, has borrowed heavily from hurling, with the game now no longer a one-sided affair. Players are now expected to be able to hit off both sides.

It says a lot for hurling that it has had its effect on other sports.
 

Levellers

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Very interesting programme. I have to say I was astounded at the facilities at Clermont.
 

Betson

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I did not see it , I will try and get it later on the RTE player.

They had a few programs last year that were entertaining as well , a hurler went to Australia to play Cricket and an English cricketer came to a Hurling club over here. There was also an exchange between a Gaelic Footballer and an American Footballer.
 

gerhard dengler

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There seems to be a growing awareness among professional sports coaches that some sports can borrow skills or techniques from others. A couple of county cricket clubs in the UK draft in hurlers for a couple of sessions in preseason training to aid in some fielding drills as well as switch-hitting. I think that Peter Schmeichel may have been in the vanguard of this - his star jump was essentially copied from Olympic Handball. Hockey, also, has borrowed heavily from hurling, with the game now no longer a one-sided affair. Players are now expected to be able to hit off both sides.

It says a lot for hurling that it has had its effect on other sports.
Yeah, the cross pollination of skills is interesting to witness in these programmes. Clermont appeared to be impressed with Murphy's fitness (for an amateur) and his co-ordination skills for catching the ball and passing the ball. He'd never played rugby before but his skills of catching the high ball in GAA appears to have been beneficial. Similarly Shane Williams speed was an obvious skill on the GAA pitch.

Last year cricketer Steve Harmison swapped cricket for hurling. He did quite well playing for a club in Tipperary, which is interesting because although he's a cricketer he's not a noted batsman at Test Cricket level. But what skills he does possess as a batsman helped with his hurling adventure. Brendan Maher the Tipperary hurling captain went to, I think, it was Adelaide and he fared reasonably well
at batting even if it was just for one over in front of a full house. Maher made the point that before the GAA club was formally founded in his parish that some of antecedents had played for one of the three cricket clubs in his parish in the 1800's.

A former boss of mine played in the Walker Cup (Golf). Long retired at the time from competitive golf, one of his golfing buddies was the former Kilkenny great DJ Carey. The boss used say that Carey had the skills to become not only the best amateur golfer, but he'd have a serious chance of making it as a competitive professional.
 

gerhard dengler

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I did not see it , I will try and get it later on the RTE player.

They had a few programs last year that were entertaining as well , a hurler went to Australia to play Cricket and an English cricketer came to a Hurling club over here. There was also an exchange between a Gaelic Footballer and an American Footballer.
That was the black American footballer who played for the Aidan O'Shea's team? He was a superb. Again like Shane Williams he appeared to pick up the skills of football relatively easily. What I remember from that programme was his speed of his cadence.

A great friend of mine to this very day, he was born with literally innate sporting talent. His hand/eye co-ordination is phenomenal.
He is blessed with arms which can throw a ball (or anything else) with pinpoint accuracy and speed. Whether it is a sliothar or a cricket ball or even a stone, ask him to throw at a target and he can do it either while standing still or running.

I'll give you a good one. A group of us were out at U.C.D. sports campus in the late 1980's.

One of the group was out there on business. So while he was doing his thing, myself and this friend of mine were walking the periphery of the track. Out in the middle doing some training was the Olympian Terry McHugh. We walked over to him and we asked if he minded us watching him throw (the javelin). McHugh had no problem. My friend watched McHugh throw and throw. He said to me "you know I'm going to ask him if he'd let me throw because I reckon, I could throw further than him"!

Lo and behold, he walked up and asked McHugh, and in fairness, McHugh let him throw. They might have done half a dozen throws each before McHugh said "I haven't seen you on the circuit before, are you home from abroad?"
My friend said that he lived in Dublin and had never thrown a javelin before in his life. McHugh was literally dumb struck asking him how did he learn to throw like he does. My friend told him that he's always been interested in playing sports when throwing projectiles was involved but javelin was one sport he'd never tried.

McHugh could not believe what he was hearing. He refused to accept that this chap had never thrown a javelin before. McHugh wanted to get his details because he reckoned with some work on his technique, this guy had the ability to go as far as he wanted. Of course the same guy never had any interest in taking up the javelin, he just wanted to see if he could beat Terry McHugh's distances. He wasn't far off those distances.
 
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That was the black American footballer who played for the Aidan O'Shea's team? He was a superb. Again like Shane Williams he appeared to pick up the skills of football relatively easily. What I remember from that programme was his speed of his cadence.

A great friend of mine to this very day, he was born with literally innate sporting talent. His hand/eye co
 
Joined
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Messages
39,552
That was the black American footballer who played for the Aidan O'Shea's team? He was a superb. Again like Shane Williams he appeared to pick up the skills of football relatively easily. What I remember from that programme was his speed of his cadence.

A great friend of mine to this very day, he was born with literally innate sporting talent. His hand/eye co-ordination is phenomenal.
He is blessed with arms which can throw a ball (or anything else) with pinpoint accuracy and speed. Whether it is a sliothar or a cricket ball or even a stone, ask him to throw at a target and he can do it either while standing still or running.

I'll give you a good one. A group of us were out at U.C.D. sports campus in the late 1980's.

One of the group was out there on business. So while he was doing his thing, myself and this friend of mine were walking the periphery of the track. Out in the middle doing some training was the Olympian Terry McHugh. We walked over to him and we asked if he minded us watching him throw (the javelin). McHugh had no problem. My friend watched McHugh throw and throw. He said to me "you know I'm going to ask him if he'd let me throw because I reckon, I could throw further than him"!

Lo and behold, he walked up and asked McHugh, and in fairness, McHugh let him throw. They might have done half a dozen throws each before McHugh said "I haven't seen you on the circuit before, are you home from abroad?"
My friend said that he lived in Dublin and had never thrown a javelin before in his life. McHugh was literally dumb struck asking him how did he learn to throw like he does. My friend told him that he's always been interested in playing sports when throwing projectiles was involved but javelin was one sport he'd never tried.

McHugh could not believe what he was hearing. He refused to accept that this chap had never thrown a javelin before. McHugh wanted to get his details because he reckoned with some work on his technique, this guy had the ability to go as far as he wanted. Of course the same guy never had any interest in taking up the javelin, he just wanted to see if he could beat Terry McHugh's distances. He wasn't far off those distances.
I have a feeling that I know who you're talking about. Were his initials DS?
 

Roy Feen

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Look at the Aussie full back Israel Folau. He's had a career in League, Union and AFL.

Some people are just all rounders I guess.
 

retep

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Sorry, I posted this on the main GAA 2017 thread without realising there was an existing thread:

Just wondering about anyone's thoughts on The Toughest Trade? Seems poor Lee Chin has gotten himself into a spot of bother with his claims of a drinking culture in Ice hockey which he has now retracted. When this is combined with the revelation in December from the Mayo about the trouble that Aidan O'Shea's participation in last years series where he went for an NFL tryout, ya kinda got to question of these social sporting experiments beyond their curious entertainment value and of course the attractive brand publicity for AIB, the series sponsor.

Like so much reality tv style programming it's all very contrived for a particular tv audience, in this case probably the off season GAA fan, although it does seem to feel the need to offer qualifiers for the non GAA head such as the intro of DJ Carey in tonight's programme just in case a viewer never heard of him.

In reality I suspect outside of Ireland, unfortunately this program or social experiment wouldn't register. And whilst i suppose it does cast an insight into the dedication and professionalism of GAA players in an amateur code when contrasted along side professional opposites, it is something of a stretch to even begin to draw any further meaningful parallels.


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gerhard dengler

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Sorry, I posted this on the main GAA 2017 thread without realising there was an existing thread:

Just wondering about anyone's thoughts on The Toughest Trade? Seems poor Lee Chin has gotten himself into a spot of bother with his claims of a drinking culture in Ice hockey which he has now retracted. When this is combined with the revelation in December from the Mayo about the trouble that Aidan O'Shea's participation in last years series where he went for an NFL tryout, ya kinda got to question of these social sporting experiments beyond their curious entertainment value and of course the attractive brand publicity for AIB, the series sponsor.

Like so much reality tv style programming it's all very contrived for a particular tv audience, in this case probably the off season GAA fan, although it does seem to feel the need to offer qualifiers for the non GAA head such as the intro of DJ Carey in tonight's programme just in case a viewer never heard of him.

In reality I suspect outside of Ireland, unfortunately this program or social experiment wouldn't register. And whilst i suppose it does cast an insight into the dedication and professionalism of GAA players in an amateur code when contrasted along side professional opposites, it is something of a stretch to even begin to draw any further meaningful parallels.


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I can see the basis for holding that view.

As someone who's intrigued with sport performance generally, I find it fascinating to see how proficient practitioners in one sport adapt to performing in another sport.
 

The_SR

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How did Lee Chin get picked for this? He had a chance at professional sport last year and decided to go drinking instead. Irony overload
 

Clanrickard

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How did Lee Chin get picked for this? He had a chance at professional sport last year and decided to go drinking instead. Irony overload
Do you mean with Wexford Youths?
 

TedHankey

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Sorry, I posted this on the main GAA 2017 thread without realising there was an existing thread:

Just wondering about anyone's thoughts on The Toughest Trade? Seems poor Lee Chin has gotten himself into a spot of bother with his claims of a drinking culture in Ice hockey which he has now retracted. When this is combined with the revelation in December from the Mayo about the trouble that Aidan O'Shea's participation in last years series where he went for an NFL tryout, ya kinda got to question of these social sporting experiments beyond their curious entertainment value and of course the attractive brand publicity for AIB, the series sponsor.

Like so much reality tv style programming it's all very contrived for a particular tv audience, in this case probably the off season GAA fan, although it does seem to feel the need to offer qualifiers for the non GAA head such as the intro of DJ Carey in tonight's programme just in case a viewer never heard of him.

In reality I suspect outside of Ireland, unfortunately this program or social experiment wouldn't register. And whilst i suppose it does cast an insight into the dedication and professionalism of GAA players in an amateur code when contrasted along side professional opposites, it is something of a stretch to even begin to draw any further meaningful parallels.

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I wouldn't read too much into the Chin comments, I suspect he only spoke of what he saw and heard. Smoke in a bottle. If he has retracted it i'm sure it'll blow over. What was the issue with O Shea?

The program itself is quite silly really. I agree it seemed very contrived, players of both home codes not even attempting to seriously engage against the traded player during the "match" part as an example. Not that I would have expected seasoned players of one sport to take a novice seriously of course but it just highlighted the ridiculousness of it. A waste of time and money, not unusual for rte.
 

The_SR

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Do you mean with Wexford Youths?
Yes. Signed a lucrative short term contract and then decided not to bother. I find it odd he was selected considering his proven allergy to hard work.
 

TedHankey

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Yes. Signed a lucrative short term contract and then decided not to bother. I find it odd he was selected considering his proven allergy to hard work.
What do you mean he decided not to bother? Did he break the contract?
 

The_SR

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What do you mean he decided not to bother? Did he break the contract?
Yes. He refused to show for the play-off and decided to go to a do instead. So it's a bit odd he was picked for this show
 

rockofcashel

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Yes. He refused to show for the play-off and decided to go to a do instead. So it's a bit odd he was picked for this show
Um.. did he not just head back to the GAA because the play offs werent part of the deal ?
 

TedHankey

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Yes. He refused to show for the play-off and decided to go to a do instead. So it's a bit odd he was picked for this show
He has explained this already it seems.

A lot of people have it wrong, These keyboard warriors and those guys, they think they know it all. They think they have their facts right too.

My agreement with the club: Shane [Keegan] contacted me and I was still involved with the club [hurling] here in Wexford. I was going away to New York for a weekend to hurl over there with Ulster in the New York county final. Shane had rang me the day before I was leaving for New York and he needed me to sign a contract before I left for New York because by the time I got back from New York, the deadline was finished for anybody else to sign for the club.

I had explained to Shane that I wasn't really comfortable about signing a contract. I didn't want to rush into anything because my previous experiences with contracts was that I was bound by one and I couldn't play any other sport and this is not what I wanted happening again because I didn't want anything interfering with my hurling or GAA when it came back around.

I explained it to Shane and Shane simply notified me that it was not a professional contract, it is an amateur contract I would be signing and they just needed a signature to just say I am a member of the club. It didn't say on the contract that the club had a hold over me or that they could control anything to do with me. It was totally off my own back so, basically, it was almost like a volunteering role. I was doing it off my own time and my own will to play for the club. That's the type of contract I signed.

It was basically as if I signed for a local Sunday league team.
https://www.sportsjoe.ie/football/lee-chin-explains-wexford-youths-contract-choosing-star-awards-final-game-101542
 


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