The warm and fuzzy thread

Rural

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Here's a "dawn Picture" I took outside a couple of weeks ago. A red sky in the morning is supposed to be a bad thing, but it looks beautiful all the same.:)


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Dawn. Anytime of the year. Especially spring and summer though. When there is no-one else up or around.

Best time of the day. I often get up at dawn even on the weekends. Can always have a nap later to make up for any lost sleep.
 


Blokesbloke

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I think I'm in love with you a little bit today, BB, for not using that offensive (to me) British Isles phrase.
You're welcome... I like to have a term which encompasses us all because I do think there is a connection, but British Isles doesn't sound right to me.

I think Atlantic Islands sounds rather nice. That way we're together but equal.
 

Blokesbloke

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Oh and of course a proper open real fire!

I really, really want to get a house one day - in a modern flat now which is nice enough but I want an old-fashioned house.

If I can get one with original windows and an original working fireplace I will be a very happy boy.... sadly this is less and less common now.
 

Blokesbloke

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I have an odd affection which I think is very British for things which are just slightly going wrong.

It's difficult to explain but my best mate owns a canal boat and whilst it's certainly lovely to go cruising down the canal on a sunny day - his boat is on a rural canal so you go past fields and the cows sometimes come into the canal to cool off and it's all lovely and bucolic, especially for a Brummie lad.

However, once we went and it started out sunny but then it started to rain and got quite cold.

My friend was well pissed off and insisted we set off back to the mooring, but I had a wonderful time.

He put the canopy up on the boat but I insisted on my side panel being left off, so it was almost dry but the odd bit of rain got in.

It's a very old boat so the windscreen had a windscreen wiper but it only cleared a bit of the windscreen.

I was quite cold so I said I'd "drive" if he'd make me a nice cup of tea, which took ages as the kettle only boils very slowly on a limited power supply on the boat.

It was perfect. I was protected from most of the rain but not all of it. I was coldish but had my tea to warm me up having waited ages for it. I could partially see out of the windscreen but not fully. The little boat chugged along bravely and it was all so wonderfully British - trundling along slowly and rather inefficiently in bad weather but muddling along somehow and making the best of it.

I loved it and it was my favourite trip, far more than the perfect sunny days. My mate was baffled at first but my obvious joy cheered him up too and we ended up having a rare old time.

Can anyone else understand this or am I just a freak?
 

Blokesbloke

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I also have an odd fondness for overcooked, dried-out and stale food.

I went to a carvery once and I said I wanted some of the steak pie, my friend said no cos they only had one piece left which had been done to death under a heat lamp - that was PERFECT! It was a little bit dried out, just how I like it.

I also love stale biscuits which have gone a bit soft, and when I left the top off some Pringles they went all soft too.

Delicious!
 

Blokesbloke

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The more I read my old posts back the more odd I realise I am.

I think apart from the poofiness I was born in the wrong time. I like old-fashioned things.
 

Blokesbloke

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Here's a "dawn Picture" I took outside a couple of weeks ago. A red sky in the morning is supposed to be a bad thing, but it looks beautiful all the same.:)


[/URL]free image uploader[/IMG]
Lovely! Is that near your house?

Chimney pots in the distance - do people still have real fires?

Do the childer still skip to school through the fields?
 

Blokesbloke

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Oh and a crisis, how I love a crisis.

When proper snow falls and everything stops - the police won't send anyone out in a car unless it's a dire emergency, the buses and trains stop and there's a sense of a national emergency.

It's such fun.

I look with envy at the 1970s with the constant strikes and power cuts.

It's all so cosy.

How I love cosiness.
 

Rural

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I have an odd affection which I think is very British for things which are just slightly going wrong.

It's difficult to explain but my best mate owns a canal boat and whilst it's certainly lovely to go cruising down the canal on a sunny day - his boat is on a rural canal so you go past fields and the cows sometimes come into the canal to cool off and it's all lovely and bucolic, especially for a Brummie lad.

However, once we went and it started out sunny but then it started to rain and got quite cold.

My friend was well pissed off and insisted we set off back to the mooring, but I had a wonderful time.

He put the canopy up on the boat but I insisted on my side panel being left off, so it was almost dry but the odd bit of rain got in.

It's a very old boat so the windscreen had a windscreen wiper but it only cleared a bit of the windscreen.

I was quite cold so I said I'd "drive" if he'd make me a nice cup of tea, which took ages as the kettle only boils very slowly on a limited power supply on the boat.

It was perfect. I was protected from most of the rain but not all of it. I was coldish but had my tea to warm me up having waited ages for it. I could partially see out of the windscreen but not fully. The little boat chugged along bravely and it was all so wonderfully British - trundling along slowly and rather inefficiently in bad weather but muddling along somehow and making the best of it.

I loved it and it was my favourite trip, far more than the perfect sunny days. My mate was baffled at first but my obvious joy cheered him up too and we ended up having a rare old time.

Can anyone else understand this or am I just a freak?
You're not a freak, perfection is so overrated, what's wrong with muddling through and enjoying the experience?

When I lived in London, myself and the other female housemate were kindly dropped home after a night out, so I invited the driver and his girlfriend in for tea, Tina (my housemate) was saying that there was nothing in the house, but there was flour, eggs, milk, sugar and tea, so I made the pancakes and Tina made the tea. It went down a treat, I'm tellin' ya!:D
 

Rural

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Lovely! Is that near your house?

Chimney pots in the distance - do people still have real fires?

Do the childer still skip to school through the fields?
It's from the garden of the house, our house is behind me and the house in the picture is a holiday home.
 

GDPR

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The sight of the mountains in Connemara with the lake before it, when I get to the folks house in Galway. A deep satisfaction seeps through my bones, I'm home.
 

Ellen Ripley

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I have an odd affection which I think is very British for things which are just slightly going wrong.

It's difficult to explain but my best mate owns a canal boat and whilst it's certainly lovely to go cruising down the canal on a sunny day - his boat is on a rural canal so you go past fields and the cows sometimes come into the canal to cool off and it's all lovely and bucolic, especially for a Brummie lad.

However, once we went and it started out sunny but then it started to rain and got quite cold.

My friend was well pissed off and insisted we set off back to the mooring, but I had a wonderful time.

He put the canopy up on the boat but I insisted on my side panel being left off, so it was almost dry but the odd bit of rain got in.

It's a very old boat so the windscreen had a windscreen wiper but it only cleared a bit of the windscreen.

I was quite cold so I said I'd "drive" if he'd make me a nice cup of tea, which took ages as the kettle only boils very slowly on a limited power supply on the boat.

It was perfect. I was protected from most of the rain but not all of it. I was coldish but had my tea to warm me up having waited ages for it. I could partially see out of the windscreen but not fully. The little boat chugged along bravely and it was all so wonderfully British - trundling along slowly and rather inefficiently in bad weather but muddling along somehow and making the best of it.

I loved it and it was my favourite trip, far more than the perfect sunny days. My mate was baffled at first but my obvious joy cheered him up too and we ended up having a rare old time.

Can anyone else understand this or am I just a freak?
That reads remarkably like an extract from 'messing about in boats' in The Wind in the Willows.
Ratty and Mole's picnic on the river..



You're Mole. :)
 

Rural

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Some get warm and fuzzy for all the wrong reasons though.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-sJwwQURPVZ0/USLLuI_3zSI/AAAAAAAAARw/NmDAv5XLt9M/s1600/****+hamster.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 45466

Taking a dump
Knobbly, constipated ones can be gruesome. Plop.........plop.......PLOP.....grrrrrrrrrr.....plip plop.. yearghhhhhhhhh....

OTOH, the undulating movement of the intestinal tract as a 2 lb brown trout makes its way down stream is a most satisfying experience.

I also enjoy sunsets in December.
 

Mushroom

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Knobbly, constipated ones can be gruesome. Plop.........plop.......PLOP.....grrrrrrrrrr.....plip plop.. yearghhhhhhhhh....

OTOH, the undulating movement of the intestinal tract as a 2 lb brown trout makes its way down stream is a most satisfying experience.
On that very important topic, may I introduce you to the Bristol Stool Chart?




We should all aiming to produce a regular supply of warm, fuzzy type 3 or type 4.
 

ger12

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Feb 25, 2011
Messages
47,680
Knobbly, constipated ones can be gruesome. Plop.........plop.......PLOP.....grrrrrrrrrr.....plip plop.. yearghhhhhhhhh....

OTOH, the undulating movement of the intestinal tract as a 2 lb brown trout makes its way down stream is a most satisfying experience.

I also enjoy sunsets in December.
On that very important topic, may I introduce you to the Bristol Stool Chart?

We should all aiming to produce a regular supply of warm, fuzzy type 3 or type 4.
A match made in heaven. These budding romances are warm and fuzzy.
 

ger12

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