The wisdom of siring children in old age

O

Oscurito

Whenever women that are deemed to be past child-bearing age give birth to a child, there tends to be a degree of tut-tutting from medical folks and child welfare professionals. There tends to be discussion of how old she’ll be when the child is in his/her teenage years, twenties etc. - that’s assuming she lives to see the child reach those ages.

There are also references about how a woman in her sixties or early seventies (for example) could not possibly relate to the problems and challenges faced by a child growing up in this modern and fast-changing age. It’s hard enough for women born in the 1970s or 1980s to know what it’s like to be a child now. So, the assumption is that for a women born in the 1940s or early 1950s, it’s going to be so much harder.

73 year old Mick Jagger has just had a baby boy with his partner. Melanie Hamrick. Jagger will be 91 when the lad reaches voting age. Rupert Murdoch was 72 when his daughter, Chloe was born. Even though the same arguments apply, guys don’t seem to face the same criticism. Why is this? And - whilst legislation really isn’t an option - should we be at least having a discussion about this issue to register society’s disapproval?

Surely, as far as is possible, a child should expect to have BOTH his/her legal parents/guardians around during the formative years of their lives until he/she reaches adulthood.
 
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silverharp

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if you are hyper wealthy go for it as long as both parents arent ancient
 

Half Nelson

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People should take their beaks out of others' private business.
 

Half Nelson

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Unless their conduct is placing other people at risk.
Your reasoning is for the birds, like so much of the p.c. drivel we have to listen to.

If a child is born with a disability or bad health then it's nonsense to blame the parent because the child would not exist otherwise.. except on planet If-only.

But we have to listen to know-alls deciding whose life is worth living and whose is not.
 

Half Nelson

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Says the vociferous opponent of equal civil recognition for couples of the same gender.
Says the airheaded poster who can't get his facts (or his spelling) straight.
 

silverharp

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There are more risks to the child if either parent is "ancient".
I meant in terms of there being at least 1 parent being around until the kid reaches adulthood. if you are talking about genetic health then Im sure they will do some kind of screening
 

Ardillaun

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One wonders why Mick doesn't get the tubes clipped. Does it make him more attractive (if that's the word) to women that they might hit the jackpot?
 
O

Oscurito

Your reasoning is for the birds, like so much of the p.c. drivel we have to listen to.

If a child is born with a disability or bad health then it's nonsense to blame the parent because the child would not exist otherwise.. except on planet If-only.

But we have to listen to know-alls deciding whose life is worth living and whose is not.
This is not about taking away anyone's rights to reproduce. It's about having an honest discussion about the risks of parents' producing children in their advanced years. Perhaps, if we had more discussion of the issue, more people would bring their family-raising plans forward to some degree.
 
D

Deleted member 48908

The general definition of "old age" is above 65.

However, when it comes to producing children, two decades before that is high risk.
I sired my daughter in my early forties. She seems fine.

Am I older than the parents of her peers? Yeah, but neither she nor I have ever had any issues as a result.

Siring kids deeper into their late fifties and beyond is probably not a great idea for men. I'm in my fifties now, and while I'm still very active and physically fit, I just don't have the same amount of energy that I had fifteen years ago. I believe that to be a good father, a man needs to be energetic and involved, regardless of coming home from a long day at work, he still needs to be able to go and play sports, or for a swim, or help with homework, or take the child to their extracurricular activities.
 


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