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"There is a revolution coming, Cowen..."


seabhac siulach

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Yet another warning of revolution in today's Irish Independent:

There's a revolution coming, Taoiseach - Letters, Opinion - Independent.ie
"There is a revolution coming, Cowen, Coughlan Hanifan, Lenihan, Kenny and co. And when it does, it will be a proper one. "

Those of you (like myself) who make a note of such things, may have noticed a number of such predictions and warnings over the last 18 months: desperate calls for change, for some new vision. It is clear there is a great disaffection in the population (or at least among the percentage of them that write letters!). Allied to this is the surge in the founding of new parties: a sign of despair in the paltry display offered by all the established parties. People are calling for change, for revolution. And, these calls are becoming more frequent.

However, how realistic is the aspiration for change, for revolution (and do people realise what it would truly entail, are they really willing to pay the possible blood price)? All previous revolutions in Irish history have been based on an underlying philosophy, Irish republicanism. What philosophy could conceivably take its place, in order to foment revolution in an apathetic Ireland? In truth, the likelihood of a revolution in Ireland, at present, must be ranked very low, considering that there is no unifying philosophy or party in place that could provide a revolutionary nucleus. At least none, that has articulated a compelling case for change, as opposed to tinkering at the edges of the present system. Do the many advocating new parties really think that Ireland needs yet another right wing party, devoid of vision, whose only policy is to cut taxes? The offerings of the small pre-existing leftist parties, by contrast, do not offer much, appearing cliched, opportunistic and tokenistic: avid advocates of every 'right-on' cause du jour (the Socialist Workers Party and their off-shoots as classic examples).

Merely calling for revolution will not make it happen. In 1916, an uprising was possible because years of effort had gone in to patiently building up the architecture of the IRB, The Irish Volunteers, etc. Where is the equivalent nowadays? A vague sense of unease with the money being ploughed into Anglo Irish Bank, a despair at the level of unemployment or emigration will not do it. Where, indeed, is the evidence that there is available the calibre of people, the 'shock minority', who would willingly sacrifice themselves in order to awaken others from apathy, as in 1916?

So, I ask, where is the organisation, the people, that would provide the revolution that is so glibly called for? What chance revolution in the post-Celtic Tiger Ireland of 2010?
 

rubensni

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How's he going to lead his revolution from Australia? Via Twitter and Facebook?
 

smitchy2

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There is pretty much no chance that a revolution will happen in this country.
Protests have been few and far between. Any that does happen are frowned upon and characterised as wasters who are not doing their bit to tighten their belts.

Why does he mention Kenny in this?
There is no history of emigrants having much of an influence on politics at home.
 

nonpartyboy

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I dunno, when middle class married women are ringing joe and telling him moaning on his programme is a waste of time and we need action, the ******************** can't be too far from the fan.
 

johnfás

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The analogy of 1916 is always hilarious. You wouldn't let a large proportion of them run a p1ss up in a brewery and most of the rest were the gombeens who developed the Irish political system and elite which we have today.

Just because we had a largely unsuccesful coup 90 odd years ago doesn't mean that those involved were anything like the members of the Philadelphia Convention. That delusion is part of the gombeen narrative which runs through Irish politics.
 

MPB

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We will not need a revolution to get rid of this lot.

Bankruptcy and the IMF will look after the changes this country will have to face.
 

Cael

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The ruling oligarchy is depending on the "surplus population" emigrating, as they did in the past. Emigration is the pressure valve that keeps Ireland a backward, corrupt, semi-feudal, cess pit, ruled over by a few inbred landowners and their bankers.
 

jpc

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The analogy of 1916 is always hilarious. You wouldn't let a large proportion of them run a p1ss up in a brewery and most of the rest were the gombeens who developed the Irish political system and elite which we have today.

Just because we had a largely unsuccesful coup 90 odd years ago doesn't mean that those involved were anything like the members of the Philadelphia Convention.
Sad but true.
Especially true after the death of Collins.
 

Cael

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Just because we had a largely unsuccesful coup 90 odd years ago doesn't mean that those involved were anything like the members of the Philadelphia Convention.
In all fairness, the Philadelphia Convention was mostly attended by slavers and genocidists.
 

TimBuckII

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Yes I am
There is pretty much no chance that a revolution will happen in this country.
Protests have been few and far between. Any that does happen are frowned upon and characterised as wasters who are not doing their bit to tighten their belts.
It will never happen because for it to happen the majority of the population need to accept that they ********************ed it all up over the years. It's much easier to stay in denial and blame someone else.

The difference between previous revolts is that this time we did it to ourselves this time and we kinda liked doing it.
 

Cael

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Daniel O'Connell's brother, a priest, publically thanked God that the average Irishman would rather watch his children starve rather than break "the law."
 

SevenStars

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Sad but true.
Especially true after the death of Collins.
All revolutionary struggles will attract the best but also the worst of their generations....Thus we have figures that resemble St Francis such as Patrick Pearse or Moses such as James Connolly...And barely human psychopaths such as Collins.

The day he was shot down like the sodomitical dog he was was a great day for Ireland.
 

Cassandra Syndrome

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Back in the 1840s rather than revolting against the Corn Laws we chose to starve to death. We are the most submissive, masochistic, 2 faced people on the planet. Freud was right when he said the Irish are the only people you cannot psychoanalyse.

B1tch about the system in private, but then lick the arses of the elite in public. We haven't changed a bit.

I bet you back in 1845 on the internet political forums there were Pollyanna government apologist posters on glorifying the British and saying that the Corn Laws were just and telling dissenters to shut up and that they were doomsayers and nutjobs and to be grateful to have the dignity to starve to death for the good of the feudal elite and their depopulation agenda...
 

Aindriu

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All revolutionary struggles will attract the best but also the worst of their generations....Thus we have figures that resemble St Francis such as Patrick Pearse or Moses such as James Connolly...And barely human psychopaths such as Collins.

The day he was shot down like the sodomitical dog he was was a great day for Ireland.
What a load of drivel!

Pearse and Connolly were both dreamers. Collins could have been the best president this island ever had!
 

Aindriu

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Back in the 1840s rather than revolting against the Corn Laws we chose to starve to death. We are the most submissive, masochistic, 2 faced people on the planet. Freud was right when he said the Irish are the only people you cannot psychoanalyse.

B1tch about the system in private, but then lick the arses of the elite in public. We haven't changed a bit.

I bet you back in 1845 on the internet political forums there were Pollyanna government apologist posters on glorifying the British and saying that the Corn Laws were just and telling dissenters to shut up and that they were doomsayers and nutjobs and to be grateful to have the dignity to starve to death for the good of the feudal elite and their depopulation agenda...
Good post! I like the analogy.
 

splashy

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For all the talk about reforming politics, there's been little about reforming the Irish electorate. The people now bemoaning the government and the excess of the Celtic Tiger are the ones who fostered them (excepting the objectors, of course).

Just because they claim to have seen the error of their ways does not mean they are any different. The same politicians will not fix the political system, and the the same joe soaps will not fix the mentality of the Irish people without some serious introspection -which most have avoided in favour on blaming politicians, the fruit of their own gombeen attitude.

As to the idea of a revolution, no-one in the country is in dire enough straits to try it. Hungry people revolt, the disaffected don't. We'd be better served by proving we're worthy of any change by voting correctly -and there is a correct way to vote at the moment- to get a government that, at the very least, is free of the corruption and incompetence that the Irish have tolerated for a long while now.
 

foreignfield80

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Crank writes letter.

I've been to a couple of protests, they were NAMA ones, last year, about 500 people turned up. Now I hear people whining and moaning about bank bail outs etc, usually from the comfort of their armchairs and bar stools.
Nothing is going to happen here, people are too indebted and fearful, NAMA could pass without as much as a whimper from the masses.
 

SevenStars

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What a load of drivel!

Pearse and Connolly were both dreamers. Collins could have been the best president this island ever had!
Because they were pure hearted and not power hungry psychopathtic sexual perverts like Collins they were dreamers?

Both showed organizational skills well above average...Particularly Connolly who was one of the most admired organizers of the IWW in the USA in his day precisely for his cop on.
 
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