This day in Irish History 1798 : Battle of Vinegar Hill, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford.

Pizza Man

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In a nutshell, the Brits won and the pikemen lost. Depressing stuff. The defeat was followed by lots of murder, mayhem, rape, pillage, atrocities, the usual stuff when the Brits come to visit. Oh and Father Murphy was hanged. :-(

On the positive side, it gave us the ballad "Fr Murphy of the County Wexford" better known as Boolavogue which helped to ensure that the brave pikemen of '98 would be remembered.

"By 18 June, the British had surrounded county Wexford with between 13,000 and 18,000 troops and were ready to pour into Wexford to crush the insurgency. The rebel leadership issued a call to all its fighters to gather at Vinegar Hill to meet the army in one great, decisive battle. The number assembled was estimated at between 16,000 and 20,000, but the majority lacked firearms and had to rely on pikes as their main weapon. The camp also included many thousands of women and children who were staying there for protection against the rampaging military.

The British plan, as formulated by Gerard Lake, envisaged the complete annihilation of the rebels by encircling the hill and seizing the only escape route to the west, the bridge over the Slaney."
....... and so on.

But it's an important day in the long and depressing history of failed Irish rebellions. Yez can do the rest of the research yourselves, I'm too busy.
 


PBP voter

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Fr Murphy hated unmarried mothers.

So I'm afraid in the current climate we have to condemn him. We must destroy all the statues of him ASAP.
 

GabhaDubh

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I believe the first use of grapeshot, as the Insurgents were civilians the women and their children traveled with them, mass casualties. Local oral lore is that the order went out “Kill everyone who speaks English” the reasoning, as the Wexford Insurgents were English speaking and the British forces consisted of German, Welsh and Irish speaking North Cork Militia, English was a quick identifier.
 

Analyzer

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The Brits should have invested in better propaganda - much more effective at keeping the peasants under control than standing armies.
 

redneck

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http://www.politics.ie/forum/history/187659-protestants-murdered-rebels-county-wexford-1798-a.html

Another trick the " United Irishmen " had was to put a prod in a barrel , drive spikes through it and roll it down the hill.

Great craic altogether. :D
The North Cork milita introduced the torture known as "pitchcapping" and "half hanging" into this island. It is rumored that they were ag caint as Gaeilge.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Oulart_Hill

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitchcapping
 

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redneck

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A lot of the United Irishmen were Protestants.
 

Dame_Enda

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Courageous but doomed resistance. The United Irishmen only won battles in guerilla tactics. Climbing to the top of a hill that can be surrounded was the height of foolishness.
 

Dame_Enda

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As were all the victims at Scullabogue
Not true there were a fair few Catholics there too. I would point out that the massacre happened in reaction to the massacre by the British in New Ross.
 

APettigrew92

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http://www.politics.ie/forum/history/187659-protestants-murdered-rebels-county-wexford-1798-a.html

Another trick the " United Irishmen " had was to put a prod in a barrel , drive spikes through it and roll it down the hill.

Great craic altogether. :D
I think the first response to the thread you posted answered it pretty well - "this happens in every revolution. All the time. Everywhere."

Luckily the Protestants never did anything to the Catholic population of this country either prior to or immediately after that reprisal. Sure, Cromwell and his boys only came over here to dance at the crossroads and try the local whiskey.
 

GDPR

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In a nutshell, the Brits won and the pikemen lost. Depressing stuff. The defeat was followed by lots of murder, mayhem, rape, pillage, atrocities, the usual stuff when the Brits come to visit. Oh and Father Murphy was hanged. :-(

On the positive side, it gave us the ballad "Fr Murphy of the County Wexford" better known as Boolavogue which helped to ensure that the brave pikemen of '98 would be remembered.

"By 18 June, the British had surrounded county Wexford with between 13,000 and 18,000 troops and were ready to pour into Wexford to crush the insurgency. The rebel leadership issued a call to all its fighters to gather at Vinegar Hill to meet the army in one great, decisive battle. The number assembled was estimated at between 16,000 and 20,000, but the majority lacked firearms and had to rely on pikes as their main weapon. The camp also included many thousands of women and children who were staying there for protection against the rampaging military.

The British plan, as formulated by Gerard Lake, envisaged the complete annihilation of the rebels by encircling the hill and seizing the only escape route to the west, the bridge over the Slaney."
....... and so on.

But it's an important day in the long and depressing history of failed Irish rebellions. Yez can do the rest of the research yourselves, I'm too busy.
Yes indeed.

A thousand pounds I would lay down
To liberate you in Wexford Town

Northern ballad.
 

Catalpast

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Wrote this up for my Blog today:

21 June 1798: The Battle of Vinegar Hill/Cath Chnoc Fhíodh na gCaor was fought on this day. The engagement was fought near the town of Enniscorthy in County Wexford. While not the last battle of the Rising of that year it was the most decisive - for after that date there was no real hope that the Insurrection could succeed without Foreign Intervention.

After the outbreak of the Rising in May under the United Irishmen forces were organised to try and break out of County Wexford and spread the Revolt. These attempts though were repulsed and eventually the Insurgents main force fell back on Vinegar Hill for a final stand.

Here perhaps 20,000 men women and children had gathered in a huge makeshift camp to escape the depredations of the Military. They were in a blood lust against those who they considered to be ‘rebels’. Massacres and atrocities had been committed by people on both sides but the general consensus is that the Yeomanry and Militia were the worst and the hapless peasants of the Countryside the chief victims.*

A number of columns of the British Army under General Lake advanced upon Enniscorthy from various points on the compass. His intention was to completely surround the town and hill and force a capitulation. Lake divided his force into four columns to accomplish this; three columns, under Generals Dundas, Duff and Needham were to assault Vinegar Hill, while the fourth column, under General Johnson, was to storm Enniscorthy and its bridge.

The battle began at dawn with an artillery bombardment by the British. This had a devastating impact on the masses of people gathered on the hill and it can only be expected that many took any opportunity they had to flee to safety. As the day wore on the net tightened and despite two charges by the pikemen it was hopeless against such a well armed force. Eventually those that could made a break for it as General Needham was unable to close in on his assigned position in time and a gap was open to which to escape. Through it flowed a mixture of fighters and peasants who had the incentive to get out while the going was good.

But many others were either too tired, shocked or plain terrified to risk it and remained to await their fate. It was not to be a good one. When the hill fell many were put to the sword or shot out of hand. Recent archaeological scanning of the site indicates large pits on the north side of the hill that are believed to be mass graves of those who were captured on that day. Though the graves have not yet been excavated perhaps the remains of 1,000 to 2,000 unfortunates are believed to be buried under the soil of Vinegar Hill.

* I am very much afraid that any man in a brown coat who is found within several miles of the field of action, is butchered without discrimination.
Marquis Cornwallis to the Duke of Portland 28 June 1798.
 

Roberto Jordan

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I think the first response to the thread you posted answered it pretty well - "this happens in every revolution. All the time. Everywhere."

Luckily the Protestants never did anything to the Catholic population of this country either prior to or immediately after that reprisal. Sure, Cromwell and his boys only came over here to dance at the crossroads and try the local whiskey.
Indeed, the inference seems to be the croppies should have stayed lying down.......
 

valamhic

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In a nutshell, the Brits won and the pikemen lost. Depressing stuff. The defeat was followed by lots of murder, mayhem, rape, pillage, atrocities, the usual stuff when the Brits come to visit. Oh and Father Murphy was hanged. :-(

On the positive side, it gave us the ballad "Fr Murphy of the County Wexford" better known as Boolavogue which helped to ensure that the brave pikemen of '98 would be remembered.

"By 18 June, the British had surrounded county Wexford with between 13,000 and 18,000 troops and were ready to pour into Wexford to crush the insurgency. The rebel leadership issued a call to all its fighters to gather at Vinegar Hill to meet the army in one great, decisive battle. The number assembled was estimated at between 16,000 and 20,000, but the majority lacked firearms and had to rely on pikes as their main weapon. The camp also included many thousands of women and children who were staying there for protection against the rampaging military.

The British plan, as formulated by Gerard Lake, envisaged the complete annihilation of the rebels by encircling the hill and seizing the only escape route to the west, the bridge over the Slaney."
....... and so on.

But it's an important day in the long and depressing history of failed Irish rebellions. Yez can do the rest of the research yourselves, I'm too busy.
Reasonable explanation. There are two lessons I take from it.

1) It proves President Trump is correct to support the 2nd amendment. Had these Irish men had a firearms industry like their counterparts in the American revolution they might have won. Lefties always want disarming the citizenry.

2) It shows the lengths communities will go to in order to prevent uncontrolled migration. This was invasion by military force
uncontrolled migration is invasion by EU force and in America by leftie lib loon intervention.
 


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