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Time for Irish feminists to find something else to do?


Mr. Bumble

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Sep 7, 2010
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18,254
According to the 2012 Global Gender Gap, as measured by the World Economic Forum (Ireland 'better place' for women than UK - The Irish Times - Wed, Oct 24, 2012), Ireland is ranked fifth in the world for equality between women and men based on four criteria:

Economic participation and opportunity
Educational attainment
Health and survival
Political empowerment

The UK is 18th while the USA is 26th. There are still areas where women lag behind men, such as earnings and Oireachtas representation, but we are obviously to the fore in eliminating the gender gap and the momentum appears to be upward as we moved from tenth to fifth in the past six years. Thus, the drive for women's rights in Ireland is embedded in our society and is unstoppable.

So, is Irish feminism's work done? Is Irish feminism now irrelevant?
 

Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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8,338
According to the 2012 Global Gender Gap, as measured by the World Economic Forum (Ireland 'better place' for women than UK - The Irish Times - Wed, Oct 24, 2012), Ireland is ranked fifth in the world for equality between women and men based on four criteria:

Economic participation and opportunity
Educational attainment
Health and survival
Political empowerment

The UK is 18th while the USA is 26th. There are still areas where women lag behind men, such as earnings and Oireachtas representation, but we are obviously to the fore in eliminating the gender gap and the momentum appears to be upward as we moved from tenth to fifth in the past six years. Thus, the drive for women's rights in Ireland is embedded in our society and is unstoppable.

So, is Irish feminism's work done? Is Irish feminism now irrelevant?
Their job won't be complete until you learn to wear a saddle without bucking up and dismounting them.
 
D

Deleted member 17573

According to the 2012 Global Gender Gap, as measured by the World Economic Forum (Ireland 'better place' for women than UK - The Irish Times - Wed, Oct 24, 2012), Ireland is ranked fifth in the world for equality between women and men based on four criteria:

Economic participation and opportunity
Educational attainment
Health and survival
Political empowerment

The UK is 18th while the USA is 26th. There are still areas where women lag behind men, such as earnings and Oireachtas representation, but we are obviously to the fore in eliminating the gender gap and the momentum appears to be upward as we moved from tenth to fifth in the past six years. Thus, the drive for women's rights in Ireland is embedded in our society and is unstoppable.

So, is Irish feminism's work done? Is Irish feminism now irrelevant?
Feminism's agenda and ambitions extend far beyond equality.
 

Mr. Bumble

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Feminism's agenda and ambitions extend far beyond equality.
In what way? So far, posters (male presumably) seem to see feminism as a threat. Which, from a male perspective, is somewhat valid in that if 'they' get something then 'we' have to give something.
 

Hewson

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Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
8,338
In what way? So far, posters (male presumably) seem to see feminism as a threat. Which, from a male perspective, is somewhat valid in that if 'they' get something then 'we' have to give something.
Feminism isn't a threat. It's just irrelevant.

The battle for equal treatment of both sexes in law is long won. What's left are the harpies who can never get enough of anything, especially airtime.
 

Mr. Bumble

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Feminism isn't a threat. It's just irrelevant.

The battle for equal treatment of both sexes in law is long won. What's left are the harpies who can never get enough of anything, especially airtime.
Well, you could say "A lot done, more to do".
 

Hewson

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Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
8,338
B

birthday

According to the 2012 Global Gender Gap, as measured by the World Economic Forum (Ireland 'better place' for women than UK - The Irish Times - Wed, Oct 24, 2012), Ireland is ranked fifth in the world for equality between women and men based on four criteria:

Economic participation and opportunity
Educational attainment
Health and survival
Political empowerment

The UK is 18th while the USA is 26th. There are still areas where women lag behind men, such as earnings and Oireachtas representation, but we are obviously to the fore in eliminating the gender gap and the momentum appears to be upward as we moved from tenth to fifth in the past six years. Thus, the drive for women's rights in Ireland is embedded in our society and is unstoppable.

So, is Irish feminism's work done? Is Irish feminism now irrelevant?
http://www.google.ie/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&ved=0CDIQFjAC&url=http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/releasespublications/documents/latestheadlinefigures/lreg_sep2012.pdf&ei=ShiIUK7TLYWZhQeMpYCQAg&usg=AFQjCNHWG2eynvl4aRzwPumJL-CD75M0AA

Well imagine if the unemployment figures for males and females were reversed?
In Sep 12 males on live register 273,789 with females at 155,546.
 

Eddie C

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Feb 6, 2012
Messages
338
If Ireland gets 'fifth' place in the world on four criteria, how many bloomin' well criteria are there? We don't know that do we? How many women on the boards of top companies? Oireachtas representation - it lags way behind other countries. And womens' pay in general lags behind their male counterparts because womens' employment is so full of work like cleaners and son on are usually poorly paid whereas we know that teachers and son, women are are employed in the professions are paid the same as men - rightfully so.

Now onto feminism.... Only lately the Irish Times ran a piece about the generation gap and mentioning the 70s and all these 'ideas' which ran through us one of which was 'feminism'? One, well one notion of feminism , was a notion that (apparently) ran like 'women didnt have any interest no longer in child-rearing and a career was foremost'.
That was the (apparent) idea and I bought into it...
 

Mr. Bumble

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Toland

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Are you John Waters in disguise?:D
John Waters has an uncanny tendency to pick on the right issue and then to say precisely the stupidest thing possible about it.

That men effectively have narrower choices available to them than women and that committed fathers are badly abused by the system is nigh on undeniable.
 

potholedogger

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Are you John Waters in disguise?:D
60% of university places are going to females. Females are 50% more likely to go to university than males. Males are not realising their potential. We need more males in teaching to provide more coaching and motivating.
 

Toland

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www.aggressive-secularist.com
60% of university places are going to females. Females are 50% more likely to go to university than males. Males are not realising their potential. We need more males in teaching to provide more coaching and motivating.
If the education gap at secondary level was in favour of boys rather than girls, we would assume that the system is wrong. Because the gap is in favour of girls, the generalised assumption is that boys are simply not as capable as girls.

I think the education gap between boys and girls needs to be addressed, and that the main problem is that the current system simply suits boys less than it suits girls.
 

Eddie C

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(part II of my post - and Jaysus NO I'm not John Waters....)
And so a generation ago I married taking a big (stupid) hotchpotch of notions/ideas re: feminism that basically Ireland soon would be like Germany and so on where the population was not replenishing and children would longer be even <seen> anywhere, the women would all be out working, children would become a 'thing of the past...'
Soon I was find out all these I possessed, 'notions' on feminism were, just all wrong so I feel I took up wrong ideas about women, what they want and so on.
Even as recent as the talk on this 'Fifty Shades' novel has illustrated the idea of both women and men wanting different things.
So today, that's me and 'feminism' but I do agree with women looking for demanding rights for themselves.
 

Diawlbach

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Jul 20, 2011
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If the education gap at secondary level was in favour of boys rather than girls, we would assume that the system is wrong. Because the gap is in favour of girls, the generalised assumption is that boys are simply not as capable as girls.

I think the education gap between boys and girls needs to be addressed, and that the main problem is that the current system simply suits boys less than it suits girls.
Actually, the system was changed to suit girls to narrow the gap. It now, effectively, discriminates against boys. Third level doesn't. The result is, those boys who get to third level are a self-selected cohort of those who can do as well or better than girls in an entrance system that is loaded against them. Small wonder they then do better in the neutral system. Small wonder this is then used as a claim that there's something unfair at third level, where the balance between diligence and risk-taking is no longer skewed so strongly in favour of the former.
 
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