Time for Irish-language curriculum to follow Basque model?

Breanainn

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If reform of the Irish-language curriculum is to be undertaken, the system employed in the Basque Country seems a useful exemplar to revive a minority language. There, four alternative curricula are employed, and no compulsion is required:

X - 0.6% Education solely in Spanish
A - 26.2% " in Spanish, but Basque is taught as a subject.
B - 23.2% 50/50 Basque and Spanish
C - 50.2% Education in Basque, Spanish taught as a subject.

The percentages opting for B and C have increased notably in recent years, the total figures for Basque,-speakers have risen from 24% to 33% in the last 20 years, and 57% of those aged under 24 now speak Basque as their first language:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basque_language#Demographics
 


RetiredProvo

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It will be interesting to see over the next 10 years or so the results that the bourgeoning popularity of Gaelscoileanna will have had. Increased Multiculturalism and its impact on the mainstay education system will see the Gaelscoileanna over-subscribed and education through Irish as the best way to set one's child apart from the others....
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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It will be interesting to see over the next 10 years or so the results that the bourgeoning popularity of Gaelscoileanna will have had. Increased Multiculturalism and its impact on the mainstay education system will see the Gaelscoileanna over-subscribed and education through Irish as the best way to set one's child apart from the others....
Gaelscoileanna have always been over subscribed.

Racists thinking ahead I suppose.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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How did the basques achieve that? is that 50% figure growth? what is the history of education through basque.
 

Toland

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The major problem the Basques had was finding enough teachers capable of covering the different methods.

They ploughed on through because they had the political cover to do so.

I'd love to see the same happening in Ireland. Both the numbers and the political cover would be an even bigger problem, though.

And Basque language rules on who gets into the civil service are the elephant in the language-education room. The public service is by far the biggest employer in a country/region with the same huge youth unemployment rate as the rest of Spain.

By the way, if you want to watch the local football on telly in the Basque Country, you either watch it with the commentary in Basque or you turn the sound down and look for a radio or online commentary in Spanish.
 

hollandia

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It will be interesting to see over the next 10 years or so the results that the bourgeoning popularity of Gaelscoileanna will have had. Increased Multiculturalism and its impact on the mainstay education system will see the Gaelscoileanna over-subscribed and education through Irish as the best way to set one's child apart from the others....
Gaelscoileanna have always been over subscribed.

Racists thinking ahead I suppose.
Except that anyone with any direct experience of gaelscoilleanna knows that this is bollix.
 

Hillmanhunter1

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If reform of the Irish-language curriculum is to be undertaken, the system employed in the Basque Country seems a useful exemplar to revive a minority language. There, four alternative curricula are employed, and no compulsion is required:

X - 0.6% Education solely in Spanish
A - 26.2% " in Spanish, but Basque is taught as a subject.
B - 23.2% 50/50 Basque and Spanish
C - 50.2% Education in Basque, Spanish taught as a subject.

The percentages opting for B and C have increased notably in recent years, the total figures for Basque,-speakers have risen from 24% to 33% in the last 20 years, and 57% of those aged under 24 now speak Basque as their first language:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basque_language#Demographics
The underlying assumption of this post is that the revival of the Irish language is desirable, and that it is a worthy project for the expenditure of public funds.

It is neither.

Languages come and go, let it go.
 

DJP

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If reform of the Irish-language curriculum is to be undertaken, the system employed in the Basque Country seems a useful exemplar to revive a minority language. There, four alternative curricula are employed, and no compulsion is required:

X - 0.6% Education solely in Spanish
A - 26.2% " in Spanish, but Basque is taught as a subject.
B - 23.2% 50/50 Basque and Spanish
C - 50.2% Education in Basque, Spanish taught as a subject.

The percentages opting for B and C have increased notably in recent years, the total figures for Basque,-speakers have risen from 24% to 33% in the last 20 years, and 57% of those aged under 24 now speak Basque as their first language:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basque_language#Demographics
If we ever have an oversupply of Irish speaking teachers both at primary and second level we could look at this I think. Currently there is a shortage of Irish speaking second level teachers.

There is a campaign around Marino for a new gaelscoil primary who have enough demand but the new school was awarded to another patron. If it was easier to establish gaelscoileanna it would be a great help. You would think that this would happen sooner rather than later with the 20 Year Strategy for the Irish Language which came in at the end of 2010 but it hasn't happened yet.
 

Toland

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The underlying assumption of this post is that the revival of the Irish language is desirable, and that it is a worthy project for the expenditure of public funds.

It is neither.

Languages come and go, let it go.
Why not let it come?

The demand is there, and the failure to meet that demand is scandalous.
 

mr_anderson

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I'll be sending my kids to the french school in Foxrock.
A second language is critical these days, but I just don't see the use for Irish.

As a parent, my job is to equip them best for the world they'll be sent into.
Irish is a subject they can return to any time in their lives should they feel the interest.
 

Hillmanhunter1

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Why not let it come?

The demand is there, and the failure to meet that demand is scandalous.
I'm not anti Irish, I'm just wholly ambivalent about it. I do think that it adds no value, (from an economic or social perspective) and that expenditure from the public purse should add value to the welfare of the nation.

Now the failure to teach a modern European language in primary school (especially in this post-Brexit world) - that's a real scandal
 

redneck

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The underlying assumption of this post is that the revival of the Irish language is desirable, and that it is a worthy project for the expenditure of public funds.

It is neither.

Languages come and go, let it go.
Tá tú ag caint ráiméis. If Irish goes, the present Irish state will be gone too. Slán
 

redneck

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I'm not anti Irish, I'm just wholly ambivalent about it. I do think that it adds no value, (from an economic or social perspective) and that expenditure from the public purse should add value to the welfare of the nation.

Now the failure to teach a modern European language in primary school (especially in this post-Brexit world) - that's a real scandal
There is nothing to stop you and your kin learning any language. What would your view be if we decided to learn "German" for example. Would you accuse us of being "Nazis" LOL.
Learn any foreign language as long as it's not German says Mr Hillmanhunter.
 

redneck

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Irish economy has full employment. So the education system must be doing something right. Basque country has not full employment. So O.P is wrong.
Ceapaim go bhfuil an O.P mícheart!
 

DJP

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Now the failure to teach a modern European language in primary school (especially in this post-Brexit world) - that's a real scandal
If you mean continental language then the Gaelscoileanna are planning on starting that.
 

Filibuster

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I’ve non-Irish relatives who go to gaelscoil and I really think this idea that they’re a little zone of ethnic purity is absolute nonsense and it’s actually quite a nasty slur on the vast majority of parents who do send kids there, most of whom that I’ve encountered anyway, are extremely openminded.

My Chinese relatives have found the gaelscoil experience to be more open minded and more progressive than mainstream English speaking schools, other than Educate Together.

Of course you’ll get xenophobic or racist parents trying to find the least ethnically diverse school possible, but that’s not a fault of the Gaelscoil system, and it’s absolutely not their philosophy at all in anyway. It’s the polar opposite!

I wonder sometimes if there’s a bit of a bias towards trying to paint Irish language enthusiasts in a bad light sometimes. I’ve seen similar accusations made against Welsh speakers, usually by right wing English speakers who just don’t like different languages being used.
 

mr_anderson

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Irish economy has full employment. So the education system must be doing something right. Basque country has not full employment. So O.P is wrong.
Ceapaim go bhfuil an O.P mícheart!

The irony is that it's all helped by having an English-speaking population.
 


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