• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please us viua the Contact us link in the footer.

To the left or to the right?


ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,254
I have been wondering that if we are to "manage" the crisis perhaps we need to go one way or the other. While I wished this government well nearly two years ago I have been deeply disappointed by many of the decisions made by both parties. It feels like the worst elements of left and right politics have been played out with the common theme of reform half heartedly being attempted.

Now I don't envy any government in these grave economic times, but is the mish mash of left and right politics, and the vested interests so tied to each side, preventing government from functioning as best it might with the best interests of the country at heart?
 


Hewson

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
8,337
Two horses tethered together, pulling in opposite directions. Labour looking after PS vested interests with barely a nod to those on social welfare. Fine Gael showing the country where its own interests lie by looking for an across-the-board cut of 3% in social welfare, regardless of whether you're comfortably off or living in dire poverty.

Neither party is fit to govern alone but together they're hogtied to the status quo.

Personally, I've given up on politics here.
 

hiker

Well-known member
Joined
May 9, 2005
Messages
1,961
It feels like the worst elements of left and right politics have been played out with the common theme of reform half heartedly being attempted.
Vote For The Hokey-Pokey Party... :)
 

drummed

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Messages
37,436
Two horses tethered together, pulling in opposite directions. Labour looking after PS vested interests with barely a nod to those on social welfare. Fine Gael showing the country where its own interests lie by looking for an across-the-board cut of 3% in social welfare, regardless of whether you're comfortably off or living in dire poverty.

Neither party is fit to govern alone but together they're hogtied to the status quo.

Personally, I've given up on politics here.



Me to. I'm putting my faith in VooDoo from now on. It must be better.
 

Mountaintop

Well-known member
Joined
May 19, 2011
Messages
1,263
[/B]


Me to. I'm putting my faith in VooDoo from now on. It must be better.
AAhhh...you really think if I hadn't sacrificed that chicken the last referendum would've passed????

....and if not me, then who do you think is responsible for turning our political class into zombies????
Bwahaha
 

'orebel

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
20,532

Mr. Bumble

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
18,252
I have been wondering that if we are to "manage" the crisis perhaps we need to go one way or the other. While I wished this government well nearly two years ago I have been deeply disappointed by many of the decisions made by both parties. It feels like the worst elements of left and right politics have been played out with the common theme of reform half heartedly being attempted.

Now I don't envy any government in these grave economic times, but is the mish mash of left and right politics, and the vested interests so tied to each side, preventing government from functioning as best it might with the best interests of the country at heart?
The alternative to centre left/right parties, such as we have now, is further polarisation leading to far right or far left extremes.
 

Mr. Bumble

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
18,252

ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,254
Two horses tethered together, pulling in opposite directions. Labour looking after PS vested interests with barely a nod to those on social welfare. Fine Gael showing the country where its own interests lie by looking for an across-the-board cut of 3% in social welfare, regardless of whether you're comfortably off or living in dire poverty.

Neither party is fit to govern alone but together they're hogtied to the status quo.

Personally, I've given up on politics here.
Yeh, there are two horses pulling in opposite directions. It's not working though is it? Wouldn't one or the other be more effective in opposition?
 

ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,254
The alternative to centre left/right parties, such as we have now, is further polarisation leading to far right or far left extremes.
Yes, but wouldn't it also lead to a more effective opposition, one that could keep the other in line?
 

Asparagus

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
4,882
Two horses tethered together, pulling in opposite directions. Labour looking after PS vested interests with barely a nod to those on social welfare. Fine Gael showing the country where its own interests lie by looking for an across-the-board cut of 3% in social welfare, regardless of whether you're comfortably off or living in dire poverty.

Neither party is fit to govern alone but together they're hogtied to the status quo.

Personally, I've given up on politics here.
So two narrow minded lobby groups running the economy.

Makes you pine for a "broad church"
*shudder*
 

Hewson

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
8,337
So two narrow minded lobby groups running the economy.

Makes you pine for a "broad church"
*shudder*
Well you hear reports that Labour is 'at war with itself', and you wonder who exactly are the two factions. There can only be two factions in a Party like Labour: those who have genuine left-liberal ideals and those whose ideals have always had a price tag attached. The latter includes Gilmore, Rabbitte, Quinn and a few of the newer hangers-on like Kathleen Lynch (she should really be in Fine Gael), Jan O'Sullivan and Alex White. Shortall got stick for resigning but it's glaringly obvious now, post-Budget, that she could not stay true to her principles and remain within a Party that has sold its soul.

Gilmore, like the Grand Old Duke of York, led his men out of the Cabinet room before the Budget only to lead them all back in again. This might have been his idea of making a point. If it was you can only marvel at just how pathetic his concept of real leadership has become.

Fine Gael is deeply divided too. There are a lot of frustrated people there who see Kenny for what he is: ineffectual, clueless, limp and not even remotely media-friendly. But they're stuck with him for now and their trajectory is only going to go one way, and it isn't up.

If we were to have a Party with a centre to left-of-centre philosophy and a social conscience, it would be Fianna Fail in theory. In practise, unfortunately, it's not.

What we're left with in Irish politics is three political parties that form a kind of pink and blue Rubik cube. You can mix and twist the combination any way you wish, but in the end you'll always end up with the same basic shape.
 

Mr. Bumble

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
18,252
Yes, but wouldn't it also lead to a more effective opposition, one that could keep the other in line?
Perhaps, but, because the far left/right parties tend to have more fanatical ideologues, what tends to happen is that one or the other dominates and so society lurches on way or the other. Ultimately, it's always democracy that suffers in the end.
 

ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,254
Perhaps, but, because the far left/right parties tend to have more fanatical ideologues, what tends to happen is that one or the other dominates and so society lurches on way or the other. Ultimately, it's always democracy that suffers in the end.
I guess my question is can we rebuild this country with a bit of the left and a bit of the right when the coffers are empty. In good times I can see a L/R coalition working but in these grave economic times coalition doesn't appear to bring out the best of either side.
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,385
Two horses tethered together, pulling in opposite directions. Labour looking after PS vested interests with barely a nod to those on social welfare. Fine Gael showing the country where its own interests lie by looking for an across-the-board cut of 3% in social welfare, regardless of whether you're comfortably off or living in dire poverty.
Do you think people who are "comfortably off" should be in receipt of social welfare?
 

hiding behind a poster

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,385
Yeh, there are two horses pulling in opposite directions. It's not working though is it? Wouldn't one or the other be more effective in opposition?
Didn't the Budget deficit drop from 10.6% to 8.2% this year, ahead of target?
 

ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,254

ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
48,254
Didn't the Budget deficit drop from 10.6% to 8.2% this year, ahead of target?
Is the CPA deal sustainable? Should there have been an unproportional targeting of carers ahead of all other social welfare payments in budget 2013?
 

Mr. Bumble

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
18,252
I guess my question is can we rebuild this country with a bit of the left and a bit of the right when the coffers are empty. In good times I can see a L/R coalition working but in these grave economic times coalition doesn't appear to bring out the best of either side.
I think centrist parties are exactly what is needed in times of economic crisis. Once the electorate hitch their wagon to, say, a far right party, all sorts of agendas emerge that have little or nothing to do with the economy.
 

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top