Tourism is bad for the biozone, so how can we end it? And if not, why not?

McTell

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No
More difficult thinking for those of us who prefer the knee-jerk reaction.

Tourism is a big part of our economy, especially outside the cities. Hell, we even rebuilt newgrange from scratch in the 1960s to allow our american cousins to imagine stuff in 3-D.

But tourism also "costs" 10% of the carbon put in our climate, so - like the government jet - it's one of those things that must be ended now, so that we can virtuously save millions of 3rd-worlders from frying while they starve to death.

Item on bord failte agenda: how can we close down without losing our jobs?


Tourism's carbon impact three times larger than estimated - BBC News


A new study says global tourism accounts for 8% of carbon emissions, around three times greater than previous estimates.
The new assessment is bigger because it includes emissions from travel, plus the full life-cycle of carbon in tourists' food, hotels and shopping.
Driving the increase are visitors from affluent countries who travel to other wealthy destinations.
The US tops the rankings followed by China, Germany and India.


Tourism is a huge and booming global industry worth over $7 trillion, and employs one in ten workers around the world. It's growing at around 4% per annum.
Previous estimates of the impact of all this travel on carbon suggested that tourism accounted for 2.5-3% of emissions.....
 


TheField

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Close down Ryanair? That'd stop the masses from escaping from our blessed isle and make them holiday at home. Win, win.
 

enuffisenuff

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The tourism ship has sailed and it ain't stopping for anyone....
 

Marcos the black

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Surely as bio fuels become more prevalent the impact of tourism will also reduce in line with this?
 

Schuhart

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Tourism is a big part of our economy, especially outside the cities.
Not as big as people think.
Whatever way you look at it, agriculture, forestry and fishing only account for about 3% of our GNP – even after you strip out multinationals’ profits.

So what about tourism? According to Failte Ireland That’s 3.8% of GNP – including domestic tourism. Yet, from the way they go on, you’d swear this (along with agriculture) was the backbone of the country.

Agriculture and Tourism combined account for maybe 7% of our GNP. That’s not to be sniffed at. But neither should it be oversold, as we clearly earn 93% of our income elsewhere.
Now, that only amplifies your point. Shooting from the hip, that's tourism generating only 3.8% of GNP, but adding 10% to emissions. It could be worse - like Agriculture generating nearly 30% of our emissions, to generate only 3% of GNP.

The problem is rural Ireland. Economically, socially and culturally bankrupt. But with a drowning man's grip on politics.
 

McTell

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No
Tourism was 8.7 Bn in 2017, that's a lorra plastic leprechauns.

https://www.rte.ie/news/business/2017/1228/929923-irish-tourism-industry-confederation/


According to new figures from the Irish Tourism Industry Confederation, the country earned an estimated €6.5 billion from overseas tourism in 2017.
This included €4.9 billion spent by overseas visitors when in Ireland and €1.6 billion spent with Irish airline and ferry companies.
A total of €1.9 billion was generated in domestic tourism revenue and a further €300m earned from Northern Ireland visitors.
 

Schuhart

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Tourism was 8.7 Bn in 2017, that's a lorra plastic leprechauns.
It is. But it compares to 2016 GNP of €226 billion.

In other words, still only about 3.8% of GNP.

What's challenging is framing a coherent strategy for rural Ireland. The tourism and agriculture rhetoric allows us to pretend something is happening. Along with this kind of nonsense
'It's not all pub-orientated': Shane Ross defends new rural bus service ahead of pilot project

Ross has been attempting to push through his new drink driving bill through the Dáil. The new legislation will see an automatic disqualification for drivers on their first offence of driving while over the permitted 50mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood.

This law has been met with opposition from rural TDs including Michael and Danny Healy Rae. Ross denied that these new bus services had anything to do with his legislation, which has been held up by the Healy Raes as well as a number of other opponents of the Bill.

There are eight new bus services in Kerry county due to this pilot scheme.
But if your question is "why not", this is the mire you'll have to swim in. Tell folk that international promotion of the Wild Atlantic Way is a bad thing, point out that tourism earnings are surprisingly lower than the rhetoric would suggest, and see how far you get.
 

McTell

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No
It also employs 230,000 of our lower paid. All to be lost entirely if we get anal about climate change.


Expenditure by international visitors to Ireland was up 6% on the previous year as tourism added another 25,000 new jobs in 2017 with the sector now employing 230,000 people nationwide. A remarkable 8.9 million international visitors came to Ireland in 2017.


But then a fleet of solar powered ships sailing from cherbourg or holyhead would be OK.
 

Volatire

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Dreary greenies would like you to stay at home waiting to die eating GMO-free tofu.

Ignore these fücking morons.

Get off your butt, get out there and explore this astonishing planet.
 

Trainwreck

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Dreary greenies would like you to stay at home waiting to die eating GMO-free tofu.

Ignore these fücking morons.

Get off your butt, get out there and explore this astonishing planet.

The operative word; "you".



 

Gin Soaked

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Go vegan. No more farting cows. And way less carbon emissions than Air travel.
 

Schuhart

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It also employs 230,000 of our lower paid. All to be lost entirely if we get anal about climate change.
Indeed, that's the impression created. Although the CSO data suggests there's 168,000 people employed in accommodation and food services (which is presumably the core of tourism-related employment).

However, would anyone suggest that all of those 168,000 jobs depends on tourists?
 

Burnout

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I have a life.
All those big liners that arrive in Dublin....where does all the poop go?
 

Turbinator

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Such rubbish - Tourism pays to maintain alot of wildlife in the likes of Africa, without it the likes of the Serengeti would be turned over to industrial farming etc.
 

Schuhart

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All those big liners that arrive in Dublin....where does all the poop go?
.
S.I. No. 269/2006 - Sea Pollution (Prevention of Pollution by Sewage from Ships) Regulations 2006

Discharge of sewage.

4. (1) The discharge of sewage from a ship is prohibited, except when -

(a) the ship is discharging comminuted and disinfected sewage using a system approved by the Minister in accordance with Regulation 9(1)(b) at a distance of more than 3 nautical miles from the nearest land, or sewage that is not comminuted or disinfected at a distance of more than 12 nautical miles from the nearest land, provided that, in any case, the sewage that has been stored in holding tanks shall not be discharged instantaneously but at a moderate rate of discharge (which shall be set by the Minister based upon standards developed by the IMO) when the ship is en route and proceeding at not less than 4 knots,

(b) the ship has in operation an approved sewage treatment plant that has been certified by the Minister to meet the operational requirements referred to in Regulation 9(1)(a), and -

(i) the test results of the plant are laid down in the ship's Certificate, and

(ii) the effluent does not produce visible floating solids or cause discoloration of the surrounding water,

(c) the discharge is necessary for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship and those on board or saving life at sea,

or

(d) the discharge results from damage to a ship or its equipment, if all reasonable precautions have been taken before and after the occurrence of the damage, for the purpose of preventing or minimising the discharge.

(2) When the sewage is mixed with wastes or waste water covered by other Annexes to the MARPOL Convention, the requirements of those other Annexes shall be complied with in addition to the requirements of these Regulations.
 

Fritzbox

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The problem is rural Ireland. Economically, socially and culturally bankrupt. But with a drowning man's grip on politics.
Oh fükk off - clown.
 

valamhic

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More difficult thinking for those of us who prefer the knee-jerk reaction.

Tourism is a big part of our economy, especially outside the cities. Hell, we even rebuilt newgrange from scratch in the 1960s to allow our american cousins to imagine stuff in 3-D.

But tourism also "costs" 10% of the carbon put in our climate, so - like the government jet - it's one of those things that must be ended now, so that we can virtuously save millions of 3rd-worlders from frying while they starve to death.

Item on bord failte agenda: how can we close down without losing our jobs?


Tourism's carbon impact three times larger than estimated - BBC News


A new study says global tourism accounts for 8% of carbon emissions, around three times greater than previous estimates.
The new assessment is bigger because it includes emissions from travel, plus the full life-cycle of carbon in tourists' food, hotels and shopping.
Driving the increase are visitors from affluent countries who travel to other wealthy destinations.
The US tops the rankings followed by China, Germany and India.


Tourism is a huge and booming global industry worth over $7 trillion, and employs one in ten workers around the world. It's growing at around 4% per annum.
Previous estimates of the impact of all this travel on carbon suggested that tourism accounted for 2.5-3% of emissions.....
Everything our government can do to reduce tourism is being dome, but it takes time. Miles and miles of electricity pylons are planned, we have 2,900 mega watts of industrial wind turbines to blight the scenic high ground and solar farms are planned for the plains. This should drive away all but the most determined tourists.
 


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