Tourism Numbers



jimmyfour

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Oct 10, 2007
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Those are quite scary numbers, ~ 20% down for the biggest markets. Britain dropping may be due to the abnormally weakened sterling (although that is changing), but the Euro drop is alarming.
 

jpc

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Jun 14, 2007
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Costs,
Perception of product.
Weather the past few seasons.
Worldwide economic difficulty.
Older visitors with a connection dying out.
Would be the main problems.
 

liamfoley

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I think we must be pricing ourselves out of the market for the lower to mid end of the market, I mean why would people pay the prices they do? Irish charm only counts for so much.
 

Fluter

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Feb 2, 2009
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2,667,500 visitors from abroad is still damned good considering the kind of overpriced, bad service that still dominates here. But the numbers will keep continue going down, and I'd imagine much more sharply from now on. It's amazing how many businesses, in particular restaurants/cafes, have no strategy to hold customers by offering good value deals. Or maybe not so amazing really.
 

Staropramen

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Good article here, sums it up really.

“The Celtic Tiger was no friend to tourism,” says Jim Deegan of Railtours Ireland. “We became too busy; tourism slid down the pecking order. Tourists were only getting in the way of us getting in the way of ourselves – whether it was roads, airports or public transport. We started losing the welcome. We were meeting customers who were saying ‘You’re the first Irish we’ve met’. Now you see people going out of their way because they’re appreciative again.”

On the issue of the frosty fáilte, Shaun Quinn believes “it was partly because more international staff were being employed, but there was also an age factor. Women who were working in the home and wanted a part-time job in the industry were fantastic, even if their confidence was a bit low. Where you had teenagers or younger employees, that’s where you got the frosty fáilte. Maybe we all needed a jolt.”

It's all smiles as 'Ireland of the welcomes' reopens for business - The Irish Times - Sat, May 02, 2009
 

liamfoley

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Kind of tells us what people come to Ireland for, not our world class museums or scenery but to meet the Irish,
 

Fluter

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Good article here, sums it up really.

“The Celtic Tiger was no friend to tourism,” says Jim Deegan of Railtours Ireland. “We became too busy; tourism slid down the pecking order. Tourists were only getting in the way of us getting in the way of ourselves – whether it was roads, airports or public transport. We started losing the welcome. We were meeting customers who were saying ‘You’re the first Irish we’ve met’. Now you see people going out of their way because they’re appreciative again.”

On the issue of the frosty fáilte, Shaun Quinn believes “it was partly because more international staff were being employed, but there was also an age factor. Women who were working in the home and wanted a part-time job in the industry were fantastic, even if their confidence was a bit low. Where you had teenagers or younger employees, that’s where you got the frosty fáilte. Maybe we all needed a jolt.”

It's all smiles as 'Ireland of the welcomes' reopens for business - The Irish Times - Sat, May 02, 2009
In many other European countries, it is normal to see older people employed in the food/drink sectors. It is seen as a profession, not a part-time job for students
 

Staropramen

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In many other European countries, it is normal to see older people employed in the food/drink sectors. It is seen as a profession, not a part-time job for students
Its not a profession here in Ireland, it is a vocation. If you dont love it, find another career.
 

Harmonica

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I would guess rural areas will suffer worse as possibly more reliant on the old americans. City breaks to places like Dublin might hold up.

Recessions may not stop people taking holidays but they certainly take smaller or less expensive holidays.

In my experience people love coming to Dublin for business. Celtic Tiger ensured bars busy all week long....
 

YUKON REBEL

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Why the hell would americans come here anymore? Ive heard countless Americans tell me that they didnt know we dont speak english in Ireland, they were in shock when they got to a hotel and found hardly anyone able to speak english and all the staff talking foreign laungages, they said what happened the polite friendly gift of the cap Irish that we were expecting but no they get someone who cant speak english with no gift of the gap will more than likely give you a short answer and doesnt know anything about where there ancestors might have come from, the americans who come to Ireland want to stay in hotels where actual Irish people work and can entertain them with there tales, if they wanted to talk to someone from Eastern Europe or India then they would of went on holidays there and thats what many americans have told me.
 

Staropramen

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Good point YT, I attended a "Managing Staff Diversity in the Workplace" module hosted by the good people at Failte Ireland. They claimed diversity was a unique selling point. I sh*t you not.

I asked them if that was true, why themselves and Tourism Ireland did not advertise the diverse nationalities working in the hospitality industry when advertising abroad. Cue the akward silence.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z637wCpchg8&feature=related"]YouTube - People and Culture[/ame]
 

Electric Sheep

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Ridiculously high prices and ridiculously low standards. Kilkenny city is a good example of low quality hotels charging high quality prices.
 

Gruffalo

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Some of my friends were going to go to Ireland (I am Irish, they are not) for a few days recently. For various reasons, none of us drive. When we looked it up we felt it was too awkward and expensive to get around to do and see the things we wanted to.
 

dmc444

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Well with a weak Dollar and strong Euro, it does make it less attractive for Americans to come here.

Ireland does need to lower its prices to both remain competitive in tourism and in various aspects of the economy.

I have many American friends whom think Ireland is a beautiful country but they do find it very expensive but the recession should lower prices.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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The rip-off culture in the pub-sector is part of the problem. The rest can be accounted for by a mixed-basket of problems including falling incomes, increased savings resultant on the natural caution that comes with a recession and yes - the strong euro which makes holidaying here more expensive.
 

Ted Maul

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There seems to be a view in Ireland that somehow Tourism "just happens" like some form of naturally occurring phenonemen. I don't really think that we've taken it and its possibilities seriously in this country. All the old assumptions no longer hold true.

The boom didn't do much for the industry either - Poor landscape management, bad planning and poor quality built environment, tax incentive driven product, and a general F*** You attitude, etc eroded a lot of our distinctiveness.

It'll be hard to reclaim lost ground.
 

Christel

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Some of my friends were going to go to Ireland (I am Irish, they are not) for a few days recently. For various reasons, none of us drive. When we looked it up we felt it was too awkward and expensive to get around to do and see the things we wanted to.
That's one of the things tourism policy didn't take into account: That tourists might want to go around individually by public transport.

By public transport I don't mean cruising.

What was subsidised wasn't cheap, affordable or individualist tourists, but mainly hotels and resorts. B&Bs suffered. A certain kind of tourism and of tourists were not provided for and put off, not least by the physical built development in the country. Take this together with the global economic situation, the news about Ireland, the prices, experiences of those who have been here and their witnessing of the change here during the boom: There isn't much left why Ireland should attract individual tourism which I think was once important.

I had many visitors from the continent throughout the nineties. Some came again and again, even bought a holiday home. It stopped around 2001/2. Holiday home was sold. Ireland had changed to something that wasn't why they came here. One loyal visitor was here four weeks ago and after a walk through Carrick-on-Shannon and its new empty shopping arcades and office buildings said later: I keep thinking about it. It's like a ghost town. There was more life there in 1994, when I first came here.

Still Waterways Ireland seems to think it has to make the last natural part of the Shannon into a cannal for a few cruisers which in my oppinion won't come, not that way at least.
 

Gruffalo

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That's one of the things tourism policy didn't take into account: That tourists might want to go around individually by public transport.

By public transport I don't mean cruising.

What was subsidised wasn't cheap, affordable or individualist tourists, but mainly hotels and resorts. B&Bs suffered. A certain kind of tourism and of tourists were not provided for and put off, not least by the physical built development in the country. Take this together with the global economic situation, the news about Ireland, the prices, experiences of those who have been here and their witnessing of the change here during the boom: There isn't much left why Ireland should attract individual tourism which I think was once important.

I had many visitors from the continent throughout the nineties. Some came again and again, even bought a holiday home. It stopped around 2001/2. Holiday home was sold. Ireland had changed to something that wasn't why they came here. One loyal visitor was here four weeks ago and after a walk through Carrick-on-Shannon and its new empty shopping arcades and office buildings said later: I keep thinking about it. It's like a ghost town. There was more life there in 1994, when I first came here.

Still Waterways Ireland seems to think it has to make the last natural part of the Shannon into a cannal for a few cruisers which in my oppinion won't come, not that way at least.
I have done quite a bit of travelling myself and I really think that Ireland has still failed to respond to the type of traveller that has been created by the low-cost airline boom. People no longer need to book packaged holidays. A lot of people like to arrive on a cheap flight and make their way around, changing their itinerary as necessary. Ireland does really allow this as when you leave Dublin, you nearly have to go back to Dublin again to go somewhere else.

Also the tourism and public transport websites are a disgrace. As most people research their own trip, this cannot be doing us any favours.
 


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