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Tourist numbers

hammer

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Jul 6, 2009
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Visitor numbers drop by 900,000 - The Irish Times - Tue, Feb 23, 2010

We really need to get Bord Failte out there encouraging people to come to the Green Isle.

900,000 @ €1,000 per head takes nearly €1 billion out of economy multiplied by whatever approriate multiplier.

What is we had a airport tax for Irish people holidaying abroad for the next 5 years - say €50 per person if you are out of country for more than 5 days. Might encourage people to holiday at home. This together with a reduced minimum wage in hospitality sector could help maintain & create employment at home. Might also help the NAMA figures with income for hotel owners / developers

No airport tax for visitors. Let us encourage Europeans & Britains mainly into the economy.
 


Grumpy Jack

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Oct 26, 2008
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People won't come here while it is so expensive to stay, eat and drink in Ireland.

Bottom line is that we are too expensive for most US, EU and UK tourists. And even where prices have dropped, we are still seen as too expensive.

I was in Galway at the weekend and a room in a pretty basic three-star hotel cost €120 for the night.

Mind you, the hotel was booked out and Galway was buzzing. Most restaurants and bars were packed out for a wet night in February so things can't be too bad down there.
 

consultant

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Nov 22, 2009
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Here in Ireland we have a lot to offer the visitor. Unfortunately, we don't package it very well, don't make it financially attractive and rely too much on stags/hen parties, John Hinde postcards and our 'cead mile failte'.

Bord Failte and successive Ministers for Tourism have failed miserably to market Ireland. Equally, the industry itself needs to get its act together and define exactly what of our attributes will attract visitors then market them.
 

st333ve

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How do they know how many people visit?
I go down all the time and Ive never met anyone with a clipboard ticking a box.

You cant expect the same amount of people during a recession.

Are Bord Failte looking more money because of this because no amount of advertising will make 1 bit of difference.
 
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Its economics. For my husband and I to travel to Ireland (not peak) it would be approx $6K for 2 weeks (includes pretty much everything including spending money but not the exchange rate) - same trip to sunny California $3K and no exchange rate.
 

FlyOver

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Feb 22, 2010
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I tried to do my best for the Irish economy this past year. Made two trips, once during the off season in February and once during in-season at the end of July. Spent most of my time in Co. Kilkenny but travel about both times. I got great airfare on both trips (< $500.00 RT both times) and did OK with a B&B in Galway (Salthill) during Race Week (350Euro 3 nights for 2 people) and 4euro Guinness :) The only thing I felt was not a good deal was the car hire. Fecking AVIS dinged me for 200Euro for a scratches on the bumper that came from gravel falling off a truck in from of me on the M50!! Second trip used local care hire and was not stiffed for any additional charges :)
 
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Grumpy Jack

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There are good bargains to be found in parts of Ireland. Last September, myself, the missus and the mutt got a pet-friendly cottage - difficult at the best of times - at a lovely guesthouse near Kinsale for a week for about €300. Spend the week going into Kinsale and touring around west Cork. Good craic, great food and fantastic value all in. Some places in Ireland know how to treat tourists while others still take the p1ss.
 

John Mitchel

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Feb 23, 2010
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I heard some guy from the Tourism Board on George Hook denying that the fact that the hotel industry is now dominated by foreign workers had anything to do with it. He said that the important thing was that the workers be trained. This is bunk. It is of course a minimum requirement that workers know their jobs, but to claim that the foreign tourist doesn't care whether the hotel receptionist is a local or someone from Minsk is rubbish, of course they do.
Would this Tourism guy (sorry I didn't catch his title) really suggest that someone from Moldova would be a good choice to drive a busload of American tourists around the King of Kerry, for example, just because he can drive? That's nonsense.
 

Twin Towers

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There are good bargains to be found in parts of Ireland. Last September, myself, the missus and the mutt got a pet-friendly cottage - difficult at the best of times - at a lovely guesthouse near Kinsale for a week for about €300. Spend the week going into Kinsale and touring around west Cork. Good craic, great food and fantastic value all in. Some places in Ireland know how to treat tourists while others still take the p1ss.
That is the kind of holiday that Ireland does well though it takes a certain type of independent and self propelled tourist.
 
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The only thing I felt was not a good deal was the car hire. Fecking AVIS dinged me for 200Euro for a scratches on the bumper that came from gravel falling off a truck in from of me on the M50!! Second trip used local care hire and was not stiffed for any additional charges :)
I felt that the car rental compies over there were just awful. Not just Avis but Hertz, Auto Europe - name them. They added additonal surcharges when we went to pick-up the car and left us with no recourse but to pay them, gave us 2 door mini-micros when we paid for mid-sizes, broken radios etc.. to argue w/them would require taking a day out from our vacation to do so. Honestly if you know a local guy that comes recommended you are better off - the convenience isnt worth the customer service headaches. Not to mention having to argue w/them through your credit card company for the next 6 months.
 

McDave

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Jul 10, 2008
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People have less money to play with. And Ireland is particularly badly affected because we are far too expensive. I don't believe the situation will fundamentally change. Landlords are not lowering rents for the hospitality industry so restaurants and pubs have limited scope to reduce prices. Even the oversupply of hotels doesn't seem to be affecting room rates as the larger developments are transferred to NAMA and held/bankrolled by the taxpayer.

We will regain some of our tourism when economic conditions in other countries improve. But because competitive forces in Ireland are very weak, I don't believe we can maximise our position when the better times return.
 

mr_anderson

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Dec 12, 2007
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The moment Ireland can offer me guaranteed sunshine is the moment I holiday at home.

(yea yea I know ... give it another 3 years with global warming etc ...)
 

Electric Sheep

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Feb 19, 2009
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299
I heard some guy from the Tourism Board on George Hook denying that the fact that the hotel industry is now dominated by foreign workers had anything to do with it. He said that the important thing was that the workers be trained. This is bunk. It is of course a minimum requirement that workers know their jobs, but to claim that the foreign tourist doesn't care whether the hotel receptionist is a local or someone from Minsk is rubbish, of course they do.
Would this Tourism guy (sorry I didn't catch his title) really suggest that someone from Moldova would be a good choice to drive a busload of American tourists around the King of Kerry, for example, just because he can drive? That's nonsense.
He's right as far as I'm concerned. When I travel to Ireland the problem is the service, whether that service is provided by an Irish National or a Foreign National. There is a serious problem with the quality of service, the quality of hotel rooms, the overall quality of the product offered in Irish hotels. I've stayed in hotels of all price ranges, and the problem seems to be across the board.

It's been over a year, maybe things have improved, but I doubt it.
 

Caothaoir

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Jan 30, 2009
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418
Is this a surprise to anyone?

We've spent the last 15 years or so destroying one of the greatest assets this country has: our magnificent countryside - gruesome mock-Georgian monstrosities, sprawling housing estates (around often tiny villages), exquisitely unattractive "holiday homes" etc.
And our towns and cities have fared no better.

Which right minded tourist is going to pay good money to see that?
 

jimmyfour

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Oct 10, 2007
Messages
195
Visitor numbers drop by 900,000 - The Irish Times - Tue, Feb 23, 2010

We really need to get Bord Failte out there encouraging people to come to the Green Isle.

900,000 @ €1,000 per head takes nearly €1 billion out of economy multiplied by whatever approriate multiplier.

What is we had a airport tax for Irish people holidaying abroad for the next 5 years - say €50 per person if you are out of country for more than 5 days. Might encourage people to holiday at home. This together with a reduced minimum wage in hospitality sector could help maintain & create employment at home. Might also help the NAMA figures with income for hotel owners / developers

No airport tax for visitors. Let us encourage Europeans & Britains mainly into the economy.
Yes it is a huge amount of potential income lost.

Your idea of an airport tax on Irish people holidaying abroad is insanity. They probably wouldn't come back. Reliance on economic-barrier style taxes like VRT and STamp Duty instead of developing sustainable industries is what got us into this mess.

A sustainable tourist industry has to stop gouging tourists (and Irish visitors). There are unsurfaced and poorly maintained roads, no cycle tracks, etc.,. .
 

Panopticon

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May 27, 2009
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You may have noticed that Irish prices for basic tourist services, like accommodation and dining out, are ludicrously high. This is the core of the problem rather than the nationality of hotel workers or the construction of houses in the greater Dublin area. Land and labour simply command too much of the service industry's turnover.
 

John Mitchel

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Feb 23, 2010
Messages
33
He's right as far as I'm concerned. When I travel to Ireland the problem is the service, whether that service is provided by an Irish National or a Foreign National. There is a serious problem with the quality of service, the quality of hotel rooms, the overall quality of the product offered in Irish hotels. I've stayed in hotels of all price ranges, and the problem seems to be across the board.

It's been over a year, maybe things have improved, but I doubt it.
Are you an American tourist?
 

hammer

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Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
58,180
You may have noticed that Irish prices for basic tourist services, like accommodation and dining out, are ludicrously high. This is the core of the problem rather than the nationality of hotel workers or the construction of houses in the greater Dublin area. Land and labour simply command too much of the service industry's turnover.
The Government hasn`t helped some cost headings

Rates
Light & Heat
Minimum wage ( In Spain & Portugal it is €3.50 )

Other costs out of sync
Wages
Rent
Insurance
Bank fees
 

Ulster-Lad

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Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,989
The cost of the Euro is not helping this either. It is currently 1.35 (Dollars) to 1 Euro. At the rate given of €120 per night for a hotel in Galway, that is 160 Dollars. Then comes the cost of travel and food etc.. I have family in America that would love to visit but simply can not afford to do it.
 
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