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Toward A Declaration of the Inalienable Rights and Emancipation of the Irish Dead

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Citizens of the Republic both mobile and stationary!

A grievous injustice seated at the very heart of our society has been brought to my attention during other debates in which it has been stated that the Republic confers a right-to-life on foetuses and yet continues through inaction in its laws and constitution to remain silent on the rights of the dead.

As every proclamation of inalienable rights should be accompanied by a detailing of the injustices perpetrated previously against those rights I hereby beg to point to the following grave and penal customs visited habitually upon citizens of good name merely because they have suffered from rigor mortis.

(1) That the state does wilfully discriminate against our dead by way of implying that a clump of cells in embryo prior to any certification of birth has an automatic presumption of a 'right to life' in law and that no such protection in law exists for the recently interred.

(2) The state does make provision for the stripping of assets from the dead and by way of distribution of said assets to the beneficiaries of a will where it has been impressed upon the recently deceased that one must be made,or where the deceased dies intestate the state then profits most viciously in this asset-stripping by way of its policy of awarding to itself a substantial portion of the estate of the deceased.

(3) No efforts are made to canvass the dead in any local, European or national election campaign and all officially registered parties of the state stand condemned of a wilful policy of ignoral of the those rights that once enshrined in law for the zygote are blatantly denied the carcass.

(4) Nowhere is it said that the principle of 'habeous corpus' applies only to the living.

(5) The dead are routinely in this supposed democracy of our incarcerated in boxes and consigned to the earth in a policy of flagrant internment which flies in the face of point (4) above.

(6) The dead in Ireland are discriminated against in that Irish law as it stands guards ferociously the notion that the living are entitled to a good name and must not be defamed. No such protection exists for the good name of those who have recently joined the choir invisible.

(7) The perpendicular citizen on finding himself arrested in foreign parts is entitled to consular assistance from the representatives of the state in that jurisdiction. There is notably no such obligation on the state to represent the more horizontal of our citizenry.

There must surely not in this country of ours have existed such an egregious state of affairs where a substantial portion of the citizenry of the state have been orphaned of justice and their natural place in the substance of the people.

I hereby am proud to declare myself as an Irish citizen, a cleric in good standing, Vicar-General Designate of the Society of Jesus (auxiliary, ancillary and pro-tem) to be most humbly a spokesman for the Irish dead and a loyal servant to a constituency which is abused and disregarded by the failure of the state to recognise the right-to-life of the dead.

To rail against with all my might the continued penal law attitudes of the state's political representatives to the rights of the dead to participate fully in the progress and discussion of our society and further declare myself as caretaker to the inalienable right of the dead to participate without discrimination of any kind in the future direction of this great but forgetful nation.

Is mise le meas

Talbot

Some scholarly works debating the rights of the dead from two law schools in good standing- Marquette and Hofstra.

http://law.hofstra.edu/pdf/academics/journals/lawreview/lrv_issues_v37n03_cc4_smolensky_final.pdf

http://scholarship.law.marquette.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1382&context=elders
 
Last edited:


Lumpy Talbot

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No
The campaign gathers pace. Brearty S.J. down the country is signed up with a note that points out that the free travel on Irish rail ceases upon the very moment of death and is another example of the discriminatory practices aimed at the dead.

A cruel irony, he points out, when the dead are often referred to as the recently departed.

Their lack of personal mobility should not mean that they are denied the right to the same concessions as the elderly.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
The Dead in NI have been voting for generations!
Well then under the auspices and good intentions of the Good Friday Agreement and subsequent attempts at a national reconciliation the rights of the dead should be equal and inalienable on both sides of the border.
 

Mitsui2

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(3) No efforts are made to canvass the dead in any local, European or national election campaign and all officially registered parties of the state stand condemned of a wilful policy of ignoral of the those rights that once enshrined in law for the zygote are blatantly denied the carcass.
While I acknowledge your obviously genuine concern for the civil rights of the dear departed, Lumpy, I'm afraid this bit is slightly nonsensical. Whatever about being canvassed, Ireland has a long tradition of the dead voting.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
While I acknowledge your obviously genuine concern for the civil rights of the dear departed, Lumpy, I'm afraid this bit is slightly nonsensical. Whatever about being canvassed, Ireland has a long tradition of the dead voting.
Voting perhaps but not being canvassed. And the fact that their votes are counted without consultation or being asked for their first preference only copperfastens the inherent prejudice against them in the system.

Can any of the votes attributed to the dead in Ireland be truly said to be the honest scratch on the ballot?
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
It is one thing being disenfranchised. But quite another to have your vote used without your express consent.
 

Mitsui2

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It is one thing being disenfranchised. But quite another to have your vote used without your express consent.
Perhaps it is time for some kind of political alliance between the dead and the unborn. Both are disenfranchised through no fault of their own.
 

GDPR

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Of course the dead generations of any nation do make demands of honour - they demand to not be disgraced by the actions of the present generation. By our shameful lackey attitude and craven submission to British and EU occupation we shame the generations of patriots who have laid down their lives for Ireland's honour and sovereignty. Likewise the future generations demand that we give them life rather than murder them with abortion, and that we give them our nation's Irish language and culture rather than rear them as Anglomaniac slaves. They also demand that Ireland should be for them, and not be handed over to immigrants so that the gombeen elite here can have cheap labour and high rents.
 

A Voice

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A long OP. When I saw mitsui and cruimh liked it I just moved on. Saved me 5 minutes!
 

GDPR

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Of course the dead generations of any nation do make demands of honour - they demand to not be disgraced by the actions of the present generation. By our shameful lackey attitude and craven submission to British and EU occupation we shame the generations of patriots who have laid down their lives for Ireland's honour and sovereignty. Likewise the future generations demand that we give them life rather than murder them with abortion, and that we give them our nation's Irish language and culture rather than rear them as Anglomaniac slaves. They also demand that Ireland should be for them, and not be handed over to immigrants so that the gombeen elite here can have cheap labour and high rents.
I would feel answerable to certain groups of the dead, after all they suffered to create things for me or to insure what either God's Mercy or human creativity had given survived and was passed on. A piety- maybe not with a capital "P" but I think the word still applies- towards the dead is something universally human and those who lack it miss out on much that gives life depth and meaning.
 

GDPR

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Perhaps it is time for some kind of political alliance between the dead and the unborn. Both are disenfranchised through no fault of their own.
Anybody who does not factor in the demands of the righteous dead and the generations yet to be born in when coming to political conclusions is unlikely also to put the common good of the living before their individual interests and therefore is unfit to have any say in the running of society or the State.
 

Congalltee

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Perhaps it is time for some kind of political alliance between the dead and the unborn. Both are disenfranchised through no fault of their own.
One could have a sick mind a conjure up Frankenstein images of doctors asking the high court to decide whether the right to die of the brain dead out weighs the theoretical right to life of the unborn...oh wait.
 

IvoShandor

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yes
A long OP. When I saw mitsui and cruimh liked it I just moved on. Saved me 5 minutes!
But they may have been only "liking" it ironically.

The campaign gathers pace. Brearty S.J. down the country is signed up with a note that points out that the free travel on Irish rail ceases upon the very moment of death and is another example of the discriminatory practices aimed at the dead.
Their lack of personal mobility should not mean that they are denied the right to the same concessions as the elderly.
Ah, sure, they might as well try it on. The security people might be reluctant to ask for a ticket. In any case, they could always try the Ghost Train.
 
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Lumpy Talbot

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No
At one time we Irish buried our dead close to the house so that they wouldn't feel left out of things. We considered the 'veil' between life and death a very gossamer thing and that on occasion the dead could move through it and turn up to have the old tobacco pouch replenished or to carry on an argument about that briar hedge planted in the top field in 1472 and not a sickle taken to it since.

I am giving consideration to the calling of a public demonstration and march by the dead on the Dail around halloween this year.
 

Calvin J. Hamilton

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Course the dead have a say there are many people who vote for the 2 gombeen partys no matter how they wreck the economy and country because '' I always vote FF/FG because my great great grand pappy voted that way so did all the family''
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Funny how it is just assumed that one's ancestor would vote the same way down the centuries without ever considering switching their vote.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Apr 2, 2016
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Citizens of the Republic both mobile and stationary!

A grievous injustice seated at the very heart of our society has been brought to my attention during other debates in which it has been stated that the Republic confers a right-to-life on foetuses and yet continues through inaction in its laws and constitution to remain silent on the rights of the dead.

As every proclamation of inalienable rights should be accompanied by a detailing of the injustices perpetrated previously against those rights I hereby beg to point to the following grave and penal customs visited habitually upon citizens of good name merely because they have suffered from rigor mortis.

(1) That the state does wilfully discriminate against our dead by way of implying that a clump of cells in embryo prior to any certification of birth has an automatic presumption of a 'right to life' in law and that no such protection in law exists for the recently interred.

(2) The state does make provision for the stripping of assets from the dead and by way of distribution of said assets to the beneficiaries of a will where it has been impressed upon the recently deceased that one must be made,or where the deceased dies intestate the state then profits most viciously in this asset-stripping by way of its policy of awarding to itself a substantial portion of the estate of the deceased.

(3) No efforts are made to canvass the dead in any local, European or national election campaign and all officially registered parties of the state stand condemned of a wilful policy of ignoral of the those rights that once enshrined in law for the zygote are blatantly denied the carcass.

(4) Nowhere is it said that the principle of 'habeous corpus' applies only to the living.

(5) The dead are routinely in this supposed democracy of our incarcerated in boxes and consigned to the earth in a policy of flagrant internment which flies in the face of point (4) above.

(6) The dead in Ireland are discriminated against in that Irish law as it stands guards ferociously the notion that the living are entitled to a good name and must not be defamed. No such protection exists for the good name of those who have recently joined the choir invisible.

(7) The perpendicular citizen on finding himself arrested in foreign parts is entitled to consular assistance from the representatives of the state in that jurisdiction. There is notably no such obligation on the state to represent the more horizontal of our citizenry.

There must surely not in this country of ours have existed such an egregious state of affairs where a substantial portion of the citizenry of the state have been orphaned of justice and their natural place in the substance of the people.

I hereby am proud to declare myself as an Irish citizen, a cleric in good standing, Vicar-General Designate of the Society of Jesus (auxiliary, ancillary and pro-tem) to be most humbly a spokesman for the Irish dead and a loyal servant to a constituency which is abused and disregarded by the failure of the state to recognise the right-to-life of the dead.

To rail against with all my might the continued penal law attitudes of the state's political representatives to the rights of the dead to participate fully in the progress and discussion of our society and further declare myself as caretaker to the inalienable right of the dead to participate without discrimination of any kind in the future direction of this great but forgetful nation.

Is mise le meas

Talbot
Dead funny.

9.2/10.
 

Calvin J. Hamilton

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Oct 13, 2011
Messages
1,275
Funny how it is just assumed that one's ancestor would vote the same way down the centuries without ever considering switching their vote.
Well down the decades since 1917, before that they voted for ''The Party'' and its similar splinter groups and the other 20% voted Unionist or different Unionist without fail
 


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