Towel absorbency ratings

Ardillaun

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I bought some towels a while back and found myself staying wet despite applying them to the surface. Eventually I reverted to their ragged predecessors which did the job quickly. And then I thought, why don’t towels carry some sort of rating of their ability to absorb water per unit area? I know there are indirect measures

https://turkishtowelcompany.com/towel-guide-what-is-gsm/

but what about some sort of industry wide guide e.g. 1-5?
 


D

Deleted member 48908

Gave up on towels years ago. I have eleven young Venezuelan ladies who assist me when bathing. After I'm done, they literally do a blow dry on me. Highly recommend it.
 
D

Deleted member 48908

Before procuring my eleven young Venezuelan ladies, I employed the hand squeegee method; using my hand as a squeegee to remove excess water from my glistening bronze skin before leaving the shower.
 

sadmal

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Always wash the towels before using and never ever use fabric softeners on them. Once a month wash a load of them with white vinegar. Result - soft and fluffy towels that last longer.
 

petaljam

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I recall bathing in lourdes.....no towel needed...
Why? Did you emerge miraculously dried and already coiffed? :lol:

(I hope so - I'm half afraid otherwise that it's going to be some sordid description of the state of the water...)
 

Ardillaun

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Those are just opinions. The ability of a towel to absorb water is like an R rating for a house. It should be relatively easy to measure in an objective fashion.
 

redhead

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I bought some towels a while back and found myself staying wet despite applying them to the surface. Eventually I reverted to their ragged predecessors which did the job quickly. And then I thought, why don’t towels carry some sort of rating of their ability to absorb water per unit area? I know there are indirect measures

https://turkishtowelcompany.com/towel-guide-what-is-gsm/

but what about some sort of industry wide guide e.g. 1-5?
If you can afford to change them all, buy microfibre. Highly absorbent, dry quickly and take up very little space.

They're mostly sold as travel towels. Not as luxuriant as thick cotton, but far less hassle and less expensive.
 

hollandia

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Those are just opinions. The ability of a towel to absorb water is like an R rating for a house. It should be relatively easy to measure in an objective fashion.
Yes. See how many towels of type a are required to absorb a fixed amount of water. If only there was some way to work that out...
 

Gin Soaked

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I bought some towels a while back and found myself staying wet despite applying them to the surface. Eventually I reverted to their ragged predecessors which did the job quickly. And then I thought, why don’t towels carry some sort of rating of their ability to absorb water per unit area? I know there are indirect measures

https://turkishtowelcompany.com/towel-guide-what-is-gsm/

but what about some sort of industry wide guide e.g. 1-5?
Most towels are cr@p until they have been through a few wash and tumble dryer cycles. And never use fabric softener.

Personally, I prefer thin, small towels that are used once and then laundered over reusing a thick "luxurious" bath sheet.
 

Gin Soaked

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Always wash the towels before using and never ever use fabric softeners on them. Once a month wash a load of them with white vinegar. Result - soft and fluffy towels that last longer.
Must try the vinegar thing. Do you just pour it into the machine? How much do you use?
 

sadmal

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Must try the vinegar thing. Do you just pour it into the machine? How much do you use?
We use liquid Ariel/Persil/Bold that goes in the main drum so the vinegar would go in the main powder compartment with the main wash.

A capful is enough or a small egg cup size. It has the added advantage of cleaning out the washing machine drum too :)
 

redhead

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Always wash the towels before using and never ever use fabric softeners on them. Once a month wash a load of them with white vinegar. Result - soft and fluffy towels that last longer.
Most towels are cr@p until they have been through a few wash and tumble dryer cycles. And never use fabric softener.

Personally, I prefer thin, small towels that are used once and then laundered over reusing a thick "luxurious" bath sheet.
+1000

This is often the biggest culprit when dealing with non adsorbent towels, the difference is astonishing.
 

CookieMonster

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I bought some towels a while back and found myself staying wet despite applying them to the surface. Eventually I reverted to their ragged predecessors which did the job quickly. And then I thought, why don’t towels carry some sort of rating of their ability to absorb water per unit area? I know there are indirect measures

https://turkishtowelcompany.com/towel-guide-what-is-gsm/

but what about some sort of industry wide guide e.g. 1-5?
You're only supposed to pour blue liquid on them, while horseback riding.
 

CookieMonster

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Always wash the towels before using and never ever use fabric softeners on them. Once a month wash a load of them with white vinegar. Result - soft and fluffy towels that last longer.
Do they not smell of vinegar?

My grandmother's house keeper, who was about 90 years old for the entire 30 odd years I knew her, used vinegar to clean everything. There wasn't an item or surface in the house she wouldn't dip, wipe or soak in the stuff. The smell of it, since then, has caused me physical and emotional pain.
 

sadmal

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Do they not smell of vinegar?

My grandmother's house keeper, who was about 90 years old for the entire 30 odd years I knew her, used vinegar to clean everything. There wasn't an item or surface in the house she wouldn't dip, wipe or soak in the stuff. The smell of it, since then, has caused me physical and emotional pain.
It's only a capful or small egg cup size and in a washing machine full of water no smell remains after rinsing. White vinegar is great for cleaning but I understand your dislike of the smell.
 


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